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Full text of "73 Magazine (July 1973)"


I 


73 


1 



ST.OO 
July 1973 

26009 





magazine 

for radio amateurs 




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A 





73's HAM OF THE YEAR? 



I 

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■J 

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mam 



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HMgazine 

for radio omateurs 



#154 JULY 1973 



EDITORIAL STAFF 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 
Keith Lamonrca W7DXX/1 
Ron Subka WA9FPP/1 
Yvene Grfmes WA8ULU/T 

ASSOCIATES 

Gus Browning W4BPD 
Mike Frye WB8LBP 
BiH Horsrngton K1CLL 
Dave Ingram K4TWJ 
Jim Kyle K5JKX 
Harry Simpson A4SCF 
Bill Turner WA0ABI 
Jim Weir WB6BHI 

PRODUCTlOftl 

Ru tfimary Davis 
Karen Hebert 
Biff M phoney 
Joh n Miller 
Jane! Oxley 
Lynn Panciera-FrflS€r 
Phi lip Price 
Bill Suderman 
Bill Sundberg 

BUSINESS 

Gi§i Sage 

Knud EM. Keller KV4GG/1 

CIRCULATION 
"Ace" Goodwin W1GR0 
Barbara Block 
Dorothy Gibson 

TRANSPORTATION 
Kuri Schmidt 

PROPAGATION 
John Nelson 

DRAFTING 

T.M. Graham WSFKW 

Bill Morello 

Wayne Peeler K4MVW 



FEATURES 

2 Amateur Radio News 
4 Never Say Die W2NSD/1 
6 SSTV Scene 

6 AMSAT News 

7 50 MHz Band 

8 DX Footnotes 

9 Wafker Apprecration 
10 Repeater Upctate 

10 Traveling Ham 



10 Looking West 

12 Contests 

13 New Products 
13 Hamburglar 
15 Social Events 
21 QSL Contest 

78 Technical Aid Group 

81 Caveat Emptor 

127 Phase Lock 

128 Propagation 



21 Tuneable Oscilfators for 2m FM Receivers K1CLL 

ICs are a lot cheaper than crystals. 
29 Basic ATV System ,_.,.. WB0FQF 

A T-44 transmitter strip does most of the work, 
3 3 High Performance Small Yagis ...» WA3CXG 

Mount a supercharger on that 2 element beam. 
37 Multiple Output Frequency Standard W4HSA 

Lets you cafibrate your receiver in .0625 Hz increments, 
39 Digital Identificdtion Unit , , * * , ....,.,-,. ,K10ZS 

Be ready when you're asked to produce your papers. 
50 Topographic Repeater Maps . , . . , , , USDt 

Docket 18803 forces us to run a free ad for the government 
53 DX Mobile Installation K4TWJ 

Add horsepower to an otherwise low octane signal- 
5 7 450 MHz Power Divider .... . ........ . WA3AXV 

Easily constructed matching system for stacked arrays. 
59 The Role of the FCC W2NSD/1 

Does it serve and protect, or unnerve and reject? 
6S CW Filters^ Bared and Compared W6AGX 

Complete with scope traces and bandwidth specs. 
71 85 dB Gain 2m Antenna ,.-......,......-.. KIT KJ 

Don't submit this one to the FCC . . . 
75 Compromise Multi-band Antennas • , W2EEY 

Do you expect to work all bands without compromising? 
83 Spinoffs from NASA , , . . - . , . . . .WB2ICV 

Our undercover agents are stopped by nothing. 
87 Grid-Dip Tuning the Quad Antenna VE3GSP 

Somethmg to do on a hot afternoon, 
91 Amateur Rules and Regulations, Part II .............. FCC 

Th is month Jason and the Argonauts battle seasickness in 
the Aegean, 

COVER: Walker-Gate /*wo-har *gat/ intransiRent noun 1; a miniscuJe opening in the 
paperwork waD thrown up by* A, Prose Walker to thwart repeater groups from providing 
lifesaving service throughout the country. Cover photo is of Walker telling Rochester 
hamfest banquet that amateur radio ts, in his estimation, of litlle worth today* Hail to 
our Chief! 

73 Magazine is published monthly by 73, Inc., Peterborough^ New Hatnpahire 03458. 
Subscription rates are $6 for one year; in North America and LLS. Zip Code areas overseas, 
S7 per year elsewhere. Three years, $14, and $16 overseas. Second class postage paid at 
Peterborough NH 034 58 and at additional mailing offices. Printed at Menasha, Wisconsin 
54942 Lf.S.A. Entire contents copyright 1973 by 73 inc., Peterborough NH 03458. Phone: 
603-924-3873. Microfilm edition of 73 availatyte from University Microfihnfi, Ann Arbor, Ml 
48106. Magnetic tapes available from Science for the Blind, 332 Hock Hill Rd.. Bala 
CynwydPA 19904. 



1 



■■ 



Amateur IRabio 



JULY MCMLXXIII 



Monthly Ham 



WEATHER WATCH 



The Ft, Worth Chapter of the Texas 
VHF-FM Society (amateur radio cfub) 
has operational in the Ft. Worth- 
Dallas area a network of approxi- 
mately 200 trained weather observers. 
These arr^teur radio operators have 
attended the Sky warn spotters schools 
presented by the Ft Worth- Tarrant 
County Office of Civil Defense and 
the Ft, Worth Office of the National 
Weather Service. After training is com- 
pleted these radio operators are 
equipped with knowledge of weather 
situations that allow them to relay 
reliable information to the National 
Weather Service, They act as the 
"eyes" for this agency. When the 
National Weather Service issues a 
severe weather bulletin the Sky warn 
network is alerted and goes into 
operation under the Radio Amateur 
Civil Emergency Service (RACES) 



rules of the FCC. These alerts are 
keyed to the weather bulletin with a 
"Green Alert" for severe weather 
watch, a "Yellow Alert" for a severe 
weather vtarning and a "Red Alert" 
for a severe weather condition existing 
in the Ft. Worth- Dallas metropolitan 
area. Reporting for this network is 
accomlished via the WA5YTM repeat- 
er that is located on the KWXI KTVT 
(standby) 1000 foot tower just north 
of the Ft, Worth terminal of the 
turnpike. The first hand weather in- 
formation is relayed to the weather 
service through the amateur station 
located in the Emergency Operating 
Center at the Civil Defense Office. 
The volunteer amateurs, after re- 
ceiving weather training, offer a highly 
sophisticated and reliable network of 
both communications and weather ob- 
servers. 




Alan Shawsmith VK4$S is an OT Brasspounder who coUects Motse Keys - any type, age 
ot condition^ hind, 'bug/ novelty, etc. He is pictured here holing a miniature which is 
not a toy but a complete key used by tbB militaiy. M^'s collection dates back 100 years 
and includes fintage overland telegraph 'pumps/ an assortment of 'bugs.' one or two 
n'ov€hi€s and a variety of keys used in the imlitary services, VK43S is an exPMG 
employer {B'c&sting pre-war 2}. He has also been a ham for over 35 years and during this 
time pounded a variety of Ins. He is keen to hear from anyone with a ^milar interest 
Mnd to add to his ct^ection, and will si*ap or buy anything in keys - ancient or modejTi, 
homebrew or commercial Please write to ^ Whynot Sl. West End, Brisbane, Q/d 4101 
Australia. 



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Phone & CW 


Extri 3.500- 3 775 


3.775-- 4.000 


Class 7.000- 7,150 


7.1 bO- 7.300 


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14.200-14.350 


21. 000-2 T. 250 


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28.000 28.&0a 


28.500-29.700 


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50.100-54.000 


Advanced 3.525 3.775 


3.800- 4.000 


Class 7.025- 7J50 


7.150- 7.300 


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21,270-21.450 


28.0DO-23.500 


28.500-29.700 


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General 3-525- 3.775 


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Class 7.025- 7.1 50 


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Novice 3.700- 3.750 




Class 7 J 00- 7.150 




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LICENSE FEES 


Initial License ,.,.,*, 


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Renewal ...*.....*. 


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CANADIAN RTTY NET 

The Canadian Amateur Radio Tele- 
type Group has inaugurated a national 
RTTY traffic net and bulletin service. 

Operating on 14,08 MHz every Sun- 
day at 1930 GMT with VE5KE as net 
controi station, the CARTG will not 
only pass traffic but has received DOC 
permission to broadcast bulletins. 



73 MAGAZINE 




Bmt^ 



News of the World 



73 MAGAZINE 



FLOOD ASSISTANCE 



The Moncton Transcript, Moncton, 
N,B. May 5, 7973. During the fast 
weekend in April, two eastern New 
Brunswick amateurs spent 36 hours in 
the Frederic ton area aiding armed 
forces personnel in rescuing people 
and livestock from the rapidly rising 
Saint John River* 

They were among dozens of other 
hams from all over New Brur^wick 
and Nova Scotia who participated in 
the coordination of rescue efforts 
through the use of mobile, portable 
and station radio equipment. 

Early Sunday morning, Ron Hesler 
VETSH, learned there was an urgent 
need for hand-held 2m transceivers in 
the stricken area. 

He immediately volunteered his ser- 
vices and equipment. Getting in touch 
with Norman Roach VE1ACA in 
Moncton through the repeater 
VE1RPT of the Maritime VHF Associ- 
ation, Mr. Hesler arranged with him 
the organization of personnel and 
equipment in Moncton- 

Mr. Hesler then immediately de- 
parted with his equipment for Monc- 
ton, where he picked up Reed Park 
VE1NU Moncton, on the Trans- 
Canada highway. Among the equip- 
ment procured by Mr. Roach for the 
trip were portable transceivers owned 
by Ray Hickey VEISL; George Battis 



VE1A0H; and Bill Norton VE1WU: 

Hesler and Park arrived in 
Frederic kton in the latter part of 
Sunday afternoon. 

As soon as they arrived, the two 
men were pressed into service as a 
communications link between relief 
boats and barges and the base station 
VEtAVA at the Emergency Measures 
Organization field headquarters, and 
they remained on the job throughout 
that night and the following day. 

Liaison communications back to 
Moncton for relief operators, equip- 
ment and welfare messages were re- 
layed to Mr. Roach through the ama- 
teur station of Al Breen VE1ANW, 
located on Mount Champlain, 

Ron Hesler and Reed Park re- 
mained at their assigned posts with 
less than two hours sleep until late 
Monday afternoon, when they were 
relieved by two Moncton amateurs, 
Gary Capson VE1AHM and Don 
Comeau VE1WT, who arrived with 
three additional portable transceivers. 
Later that night, Fred Stevens VE 1 DK 
from Truro arrived with yet another 
portable transceiver 

Ron Hesler, Reed Park and f^or- 
man Roach were only three of the 
hundreds of volunteers who spent 
houm and even days without sleep, 
food or shelter to help those affected 
by the rising waters. 



BvAML 



REGS 




Lew McCoy of the ARRL HQ Staff 
spoke up at the Dayton Hamventron 
to call the latest FCC regulations on 
repeaters '"asinine." He further noted 

that as far as the ARRL can see we are 
only at the beginning of the troubles 
we will experience with destructive 
regulations. 

The latest FCC pronouncements 
would seem to back up this evaluation 

The recent virtual elimination of 
remote base operation and the limit- 
ing of control operators to six per 
repeater are just two more unbeliev- 



ASININE 

able jokes added to the others — all in 
bad taste. 

This application of incredibly bad 
rules has not only hit the repeater 
groups. The phone ops got just as 
much of a jolt to their hopes for an 
orderly development when the recent 
new phone band allocations were an- 
nounced — ditto the Novices. And so 
it goes, with each new regulation 
offending and damaging a new bunch 
of amateurs. 

The troubles seem to stem entirely 
from A, Prose Walker, the Chief of the 



CB 

News 

The FCC issued the folfowing news 
release dated May 4, 1973: 

In an 1 1 -count indictment returned 
today by a Federal Grand Jury at 
Detroit, Mtch,, George Bennett of 
Detroit and the United CB'ers of 
America, a Michigan non-profit cor- 
poration of which Bennen is Presi- 
dent, were charged with violating vari- 
ous provisions of the U*S, Code by 
distributing coonterfeit radio station 
licenses purportedfy issued by the 
Federal Communications Commission. 

Additionally, the defendants are 
charged with making false statements 
to the FCC in an application for a 
license in the Citizens Radio Service, 

The indictment further charges the 
defendants with a scheme intended to 
defraud members of the public and 
the Government of the United States. 
The indictment further alleged that the 
defendants' activities had interfered 
with and impeded the lawful regula- 
tory functions of the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. 

Bennett and the United CB'ers of 
America were also charged with viola- 
tion of the mail fraud statute and 
conspiracy. Named as co-conspirators, 
but not as defendants, were: Art 
Dupon, Lucille F. Mancinelli, 
Anthony R. Mancinelli, Joseph 
Goletz, Thomas Walton, Elmina C. 
Bennett, Joseph Smartt, Daniel 
DeLao, Mary Jean Hess, Ana P, Smith, 
Jerry C. Hopsen, A.B, Cole, Rosetta 
Aman,and Lohman Ballard. 



Citizens Band and Amateur Division 
of the FCC. There is more than one 
amateur who wishes that Mr Walker 
would devote even a small part of his 
time to giving the CBers as much 
"progress" as he has the hams. With a 
little of his expert attention they 
would soon be off the air* 

The motto Sprang up at Dayton 
almost spontaneously among the over 
500 repeater ops present at the FM 
meeting— "Prose Goes." McCoy indi- 
cated that the ARRL is doing every- 
thing in its power to see that Prose 
gets ousted. 



JULY 1973 




. . . ^ W2HIMI 



NEVER SAV DIE 



EDITORIAL BY WAYNE GREEN 



WALKER SPEAKS 

The guest speaker at the Rochester 
Hamfest this year was A- Prose 
Walker, the chief of the citizens and 
anriateur division of the FCC. Walker 
spoke before a full house at the 
hamfest banquet. 

Walker had quite a lot to say to the 
crowded room full of amateurs. He 
explained that in hts view amateur 
radio w^ no longer fustifying 
itself — that appliance operators 
seenrod to be In the overwhelming 
majoritv and that amateurs no longer 
were making significant contributions 
technically and that in the eyes of the 
Commission there was some question 
about the value of the amateur ser- 
vice. 

He read off parts of the FCC rules 
pertaining to the reasons for amateur 
radio existing and indicated that in his 
opinion — and probably also in the 
opinion of the FCC commissioners — 
amateurs vvere not shaping up and 
we'd better do something about it. 

Walker went on to extol the merits 
of the citizens band — and to point 
out the extreme difficulties they have 
to work under with only 22 channels 
for over 800,000 licensees and some 
4,000,000 base and mobile stations 
licensed, A tear dropped down each 
amateur cheek — partly for the poor 
CBers and partly for Walker and his 
concern. 

Walker pointed out that these 
chaps have over one billion dollars 
invested in their equipment. 

How I would love to get Mr. 
Walker on a platform in a debate* I am 
sure that many anrBteurs sat there and 
listened with increasing fury to find 
that the top man in the Commission is 
$0 opinionated ^ and so terribly 
wrong t This is the man who has the 
ear of the seven Commissioners! A|> 
parently this is the ONLY man who 
has their ear, for when you write to 
any of the Commissioners your 
answer comes back from Walker. 

If Walker nad not been too busy to 
attend the talk I gave earlier in the 
day he would have gotten some data 
which would have shot holes in his pet 
theory that amateurs me no longer 
making contributions technically. I 
cited chapter and verse on amateur 
developnnent in the development of 
CW, of sideband, RTTY, and even 
FM! The involvement is deeper than 



most amateurs are av\/are— and ob- 
viously more than the Commission is 
aware. 

Since this was a banquet speech, no 
one could jump up and point out the 
obvious fallacies in what Walker was 
saying* As one fellow said after the 
banquet, sure there are lots of CBers 
crammed onto 22 channels ~ but this 
is not the same as one million hams on 
22 channels on 75 meters, as sug- 
gested by Walker. When you consider 
that a five watt CB rig normally has a 
range of just a few miles, under the 
best of circumstances, you see that 
there are several thousand separate 
cities and towns where CB can com- 
municate. If you figure a 20-mile 
range for a CB rig you end up with 
about 15,000 such communities 
around the country. Let's say that we 
only consider 3000 of those - 22 
channels per area — and 100 users per 
channel (a repeater with only 100 
users is occupied only a few hours a 
day on the average and the range is 
ten times that of a clear CB charh 
nel)-you find that you can handle 
6,6 million CBers . . . without any 
need for serious interference. Of 
course high power, beams, excessive 
use, and such would eat into that 
number - and it has — it has. 

The one billion dollar investment 
story seems to be Walker's answer to 
suggestions about eliminating 27 MHz 
CB. May I remind Walker that there is 
good and adequate precedent to make 
a small change in this band which 
could cure the problem - and not 
interfere with the billion investment. 
Remember that not long ago amateurs 
were forced to either upgrade their 
licenses or else move out of the bands 
they had been using — and I don't 
recall any concern over the amateur 
investment involved. General licensees 
were forced out of the choicest parts 
of the phone bands, right across the 
board. 

Suppose the Commission decided 
to change 27 MHz back into an 
amateur band - perhaps a Novice 
Class band with the simple Novice 
technical and code exam? Upgrade or 
get out would be the message — }ust as 
the Commission told the amateurs. No 
loss in inv^tment - even a seven year 
old child can get a Novice license. The 
one billion dollars Is protected. 



The manufacturers could be gotten 
behind this scheme by getting the 
power limit raised to one kilowatt -- 
VFO operation anywhere within the 
band — etc. They could quickly sell 
another billion dollars worth of hard- 
ware. 

To those few readers who tend to 
take all of my suggestions seriously; 
may I point out that sometimes I am 
just being sarcastic. In this case I hope 
that you realize the above suggestion 
was not seriously tendered. I don't 
think the FCC has the guis to make 
any change in 27 MHz* That's a rough 
bunch down there on eleven and they 
can set up a squawk in Washington 
and via the El A lobby that the Com- 
mission will avoid at all costs. The 
FCC doesn't like congressmen calling 
up with complaints. 




Now, about those appliance opera- 
tors. Immediately after the Walker 
speech, the Rochester club gave out 
awards to a number of amateurs who 
had performed outstanding service 
during the recent floods — including a 
plaque to one of the top amateurs. 
Sure, we talk a lot on the air- but 
when we're needed we are there, A 
show of hands was asked for — how 
many here have two meter FM mo- 
bile? Over half of those present raised 
a hand. How many have been involved 
in a serious emergency in which ama- 
teur radio has helped - almost the 
same number of hands, A lot of us 
may buy rigs and spend a good part of 
our declining years putting out hot air 
on the ham bands — but most of us 
are right in there when we are need- 
ed — and by virtue of the equipment 
we use for gassing we can do a 
bang up job when the chips are down. 
My hand unit has only saved a life 
o n ce — but how ma ny ti mes is 
enough? Even if nine out of ten hams 
are never needed — it still is enough. 

And about that building — while 
not many of us build our transmit- 
ters — there are more counters and 
synthesizers being built in hamshacks 
today than transmitters in the 30 's. 
There are more builden today — not 
only in number, but in percentage, if 
you count the innovative builders and 
discount the kit assemblers (which is 
about what building was like in the 
30's — and I was there). 

Continued on pdg-t 16 



73 MAGAZINE 



REPEATERBIUTY 

by Standard Communications 




NEW ! SOLID STATE 2M REPEATER SC- 



Comptete packaged repeater designed for today's popular 2M FM 
band. 12vdc. (deal for new system or emergency portable operation, 

FEATURES: 

D Adjustable CO.R. 

D Time-out timer, adjustable 0-5 min. 

n Adjustable carrier delay. 

n Remote Control and accessory provisions. 

D 10 watt R.F. output, 

□ Receiver; 0,4 juv or less* 

D Maximum 3 amp current drain. 

D 19" Racl< Panel Mounting. 

n Size: 19'^wx 5"h x9"d. 



220 MHz & 450 MHz versions availabis 





Amateur 
Net Pnc* 




2M FM TRANSCEIVER SRC-146A 

Solid state, 2 watt, 5 channel, 
hand hefd transceiver. 

UHF version available 

Write for complete specilications. 

Standard 

Communications Corp. 

213/775-6284-639 North Marine Avenue. Wilmington, California 90744 






Suggested 

An\At«ur 




Dave Ingram K4TWJ 

Rte, ; f , Box 499^ Eastwood Vii 50N 

Birmingham AL 352 fO 



A frequentfy raised subject among 
Slow Scanners is how fairly weak 
signals often produce good pictures, 
while occasionally a picture cannot be 
obtained from a reasonably strong and 
clear signal Reports of this have been 
received from all over the world, and 
from owners of every type of Slow 
Scan gear. There are two possible 
causes of this phenomenon. The first 
and most common is sync cancellation 
due to multipath propagation. If the 
two signals received at your QTH (^o 
instead of one due to the multipath 
propagation) are out of phase, they 
will cancel. Further, if this multipath 
"loss" is only around 1200 Hz. only 
sync pulses will be lost (thus no 
picture), but the signa! will still sound 
like a good Slow Scan signal Should 
you look at the signal right out of the 
receiver's i*f with a spectrum analyzer, 
you could see the sync Is nonexistent. 
There is no simple solution to multi- 
path lost sync. Fortunately, however, 
the problem is not encountered too 
often; thus we can live with it (also, 
later in the sunspot cycle it will be less 
noticeable)* 

The second cause is limiter ''latch 
up/' Most solid state monitors use 
either a 709 or 741 op-amp in their 
"front end" in a limiter configuration. 
Should latch up occur, no output will 
be obtained from this stage. The 
solution is simple: Drop the Slow 
Scan input level to the monitor, the 
limiter operates again, and the picture 
appears (assuming latch up is the 
problem — remember, multipath pro- 
pagation is the more likely cause)* 

Word is just in from Franta 
OK TOO, who writes the SSTV 
column \oT Amateurski Radio, that 40 
or 50 Czechoslovakian hams are buitd- 
ing monitors, and about 10 are 
already listening and watching. We 
should be hearing quite a bit from 
them in the near future. Also, they are 
quite interested in the direct fast to 
slow scan conversion technique, 
probably due to the scarcity of 
plumbicons there* Their monitor cir- 
cuits are very modem and elaborate, 
For example, phase locked loop IC 
and magnetically deflected electro- 
statically focused CRT are becoming 
common* 

Wayne W2NSD/1 recently brought 
up an idea which could further Slow 
Scan popularity worldwide if success- 
fully initiated. He suggests starting 
some tape services to help chaps with 



only monitors to get on the air. Robot 
proved this point a while back, when 
they made tapes for new monitor 
owners. The results proved successful, 
as most of these fellows now have 
their own Slow Scan picture generat- 
ing gear. How about some taping 
volunteers? If you would like to help. 
let me know (and whether or not you 
plan to charge for the "tape ser- 
vice" , . , although 1 will not mention 
exact prices), I will run a SSTV tape 
service list in 73 if this pans out. 

This year's Dayton blast was the 
greatest yet, W4TB introduced his 
'Trix Box," which is capable of 
numerous low Scan special effects 
including special "wipes," video inver- 
sion on every other line, mixing black 
and white lettering on white and black 
backgrounds, "checkerboard" effects, 
etc. Although Bob Suding W0LMD 
couldn't make it, he sent a wealth of 
handout information on his projects. 
These included a SSTV sync generator 
with a frame time elapse readout and 
automatic tape recorder start/stop 
control, quite a few thoughts on Scan 
conversion (both fast to Slow and 
Slow to fast) plus info on his direct 
Fast to Slow Scan converter, (that 
proverbial "black box" , , , in goes a 
fast Scan TV signal and out comes a 

Slow Scan TV signal), plasma 
panels — replace your CRT with these 
1/4 million neon bulb panels for a 
super picture" — a SSTV keyboard 
for typing messages across the screen, 
and much more. 

Cop McDonald presented a superb 
program on using Slow Scan com* 
munications as a modern bridge over 
(our world's) troubled waters — truly 
meaningful communication rather 
than just as an expensive toy. Ralph 
Taggart disf)layed his monitor (article 
on it coming up in 73) which, with 
the flip of a switch also displays a 
video analysis of the received signal. 
Very nice! Don Miller had his Slow to 
Fast scan converter (its heart is a 
single ended storage vidicon) feeding a 
regular television, and K4JPE brought 
a storage tube monitor. 

Naturally all the Slow Scan many* 
facturers were there with their new 
gear . , . Fast scan monitors, nice cabi- 
nets, low light cameras, etc. I will go 
into detail on all the previously men- 
tioned items within the next few 
nrionths. 

However, one item of immediate 
concern is STTV frequencies. In order 
to alleviate the present crowding on 
20 meters, plans were made to move 
the Slow Scan net to 14.240 kHz. 
This should give more room (even ±10 
kHz of 14.240 is better than everyone 
congregating on just 14.230) plus less 
QRM, Also, remember Slow Scan ac* 
tivity is not confined to only specific 
frequencies ... it can be run any- 



where in the Advanced class bands (80 
- 15 meters). Let's get away from the 
,230 syndrome and start occupying 
the .230 to .250 region , , , and for 
Pete's sake, don't QRM the net! Move 
off frequency I It's legal. When will the 
net change occur? Maybe by midJuly, 
depending on worldwide notification. 
If you don't hear the net on ,230 next 
time, check .240 (and this column 
next month). Also, many of the fel- 
lows, especially the west coast, are 
having problems with the trash on 40 
nr^ters, thus a new frequency of 7171 
kHz h^ been chosen. Let's see more 
use of this choice band, especially 
now while the sunspot cycle js against 
us. Remember, we can use 7150 to 
7225 kHz for Slow Scan, so don't just 
sit on 7171 and wait for 3 clear 
frequency. 

K4TWJ 



** 



AMSAT 




NEWS 



Michael Frye WB8LBP 
640 Deauville Dr. 
Dayton OH 45429 



Orbit Date Time Longitude of Eq. 
(July) (GMT) Crossing "W 



6 



3235 


1 


0036.9 


56.6 


3248 


2 


0131.8 


70.4 


3260 


3 


0031.7 


55.4 


3273 


4 


0126.7 


69.1 


3285 


5 


0026.6 


54.1 


3298 


6 


0121.5 


67.8 


3310 


7 


0021.5 


67.8 


3323 


8 


0116.4 


66.5 


3335 


9 


0016.9 


51.5 


3348 


10 


0111.3 


65.2 


3360 


11 


0011.2 


50.2 


3373 


12 


0106.1 


64.0 


3385 


13 


0006.0 


48.9 


3398 


14 


0101.0 


62.7 


3410 


15 


0O00.9 


47.7 


3423 


16 


0055.8 


61.4 


3436 


17 


0150.8 


75.1 


.•U4R 


18 


0060.7 


60.1 


3461 


19 


0145.6 


73.8 


3473 


20 


0045.6 


58.8 


3486 


21 


0140.5 


72.5 


3498 


22 


0040.4 


57.5 


3511 


23 


0135.3 


71.3 


3523 


24 


0035.3 


56.2 


3536 


25 


0130,2 


70.0 


3548 


26 


0030. T 


55.0 


3581 


27 


0125.1 


68.7 


3573 


28 


0025.0 


53.7 


3586 


29 


0119.9 


67.4 


3598 


30 


0019.9 


52.4 


3611 


31 


0114.8 


66.1 






73 MAGAZINE 



The really new item is that the 
OSCAR 6 schedule has finally been 
stabilized. The new schedule will 
allow enough air time to be useful and 
It will allow time for the onboard 
batteries to recharge. 

OSCAR 6 ON TIMES 
Thursday 0000-2359 GMT 
Saturday 0000-2359 GMT 
Monday 0000-2359 GMT 
On all other days the satellite will 
be off the afr for regular traffic. 
Should you hear the satellite, please 
do not try to use it- Members of 
AMSAT are conducting tests and 
gathering telemetry for future use \n 
trying to determine exactly what the 
overheating problem is. Certain sta- 
tions have been designated as "Satel- 
(ite Official Bulletin Stations/' one of 
these being W3TMZ. Their purpose is 
to tell anyone trying to use the 
satellite on its off times of the new 
schedule and to ask them to please 
leave the air 

The satellite appears to be stabiliz- 
ing with regard to battery drain and 
high temperatures that have been ex- 
perienced recentfy. The new schedule 
is designed to provide a more lasting 
charge to the batteries and prevent 
them from discharging until they are 
dangerously low. 

OSCAR 6 Telemetry Data 
Chan- Parameter Unit 



1A 


Total Arrav 


1 (mA) 


IB 


+X Solar Panel 


l(mA) 


1C 


-X Solar Panel 


1 (mA) 


ID 


+Y Soiar Panel 


1 (mA} 


2A 


-Y Solar Panel 


1 (mA) 


2B 


+Z Solar Panel 


1 (mA) 


2C 


-2 Solar Panel 


1 (mA) 


20 


Bat. Charge or 

Discharge 


t (mA) 


3A 


Unregulated Bus 


V 


3B 


y> Battery 


V 


3C 


Switching Reg. 


V 


3D 


Battery Temp. 


»c 


4A 


Baseplate Temp. 


•c 


4B 


Transponder P. A. 
Temp 


-c 


4C 


+X Panel Temp. 


»c 


4D 


+Y Panel Temp. 


'C 


5A 


+Z Panel Temp. 


•c 


5B 


Transp. P.A. 
Emitter 


1 (mA) 


5C 


Transp. Sw. Reg. 


V 


5D 


Instr. Sw. Reg. 


1 (mA) 


6A 


Transponder rf 
Power 


mW 


6B 


Beacon rf 

Power (435. T MHz) 


mW 


6C 


Transponder age 


V 


6D 


Midrange Cal. 


V 



From the net on Monday nights at 
9:00 EDT, I have learned of the 
forming of a much needed western 

net. Amateurs in New Mexico and 
surrounding states have had problenre 



hearing the net and I hope that those 
who have the information and the 
capabilities will mold one together 

Included is a partial chart of 
OSCAR 6 telemetry. Stations that 
have telemetry -gathering capabilities 
please send your reports to A MS AT 
Telemetry Dept., P.O. Box 27, 
Washington DC 20044. Many stations 
are needed to help with this. If you 
have the capabilities or would like to 
try, send a letter to me along with 
SASE and I will send you complete 
information* 

NeKt month I wilf present a special 
section on OSCAR mobiling and plans 
for OSCAR 7. 

,*.WB8LBP 






Biff Turner WA0AB/ 

Five Chesinut Court 
Sl Peters MO 63376 



Jess WB4ZU0 would like to let 
everyone know he will be monitoring 
50.150 SSB from 2300 to 2330Z on a 
daily basis. I am sure Jess would also 
be happy to make schedules - you 
may write him at Route -2, West 
Green, Georgia 31 567, 

I attended the Dayton Hamventfon 
and the associated technical seminars. 
The VHP seminar featured K2TXB, 
DL3WR, DJ0BQ/G3JVQand W8KPY. 
White not strictly a 6 meter affair, it 
was interesting, informative and a 
most pleasant way of meeting a num- 
ber of you. There were several pieces 
of new 6 meter gear on display. 
Regency was showing the HR-6 FM 
transceiver; Genave, not to be out- 
done, was showing their new 
GTX'600, and Linear Systems featur- 
ed the new SB- 50 AM and SSB trans- 
ceiver. 

Happened acro^ several of the 6 
meter crowd on the display floor — 
Wayne K8LEE was there as was Bob 
WA8PEB. Met WB8JHT at the flea 
market and saw Frank K9HMB in the 
Imperial House. 73 was represented 
by Wayne and Keith ... hope to see 
you there next year. 

Didn't attend the West Coast 
VHF/UHF Conference? Here are some 
of the things we missed: Power tran- 
sistors for VHF/UHF - W6FIG, Solid 
State Receivers - W6FZJ, 50 MHz 
Propagation - W6ABN, EME (50 
MHz) - W7FN. Sorry I couldn't make 
it. 

Art WA1EXN comments that the 
April 1st aurora started around 1800 
in Maine and lasted about A% hours. 



Contacts were made as far south as 
N.C. (K4LWZ) and audio quality was 
excellent with signals ranging from 
5/5 to 10/9, Over the period men- 
tioned the band was open to the 2nd, 
3rd, 4th, 8th and 9th call areas. Art 
worked K8BBN for the first time on 
April 8th -=■ they had been trying to 
make a CW scatter contact all winter. 
Maine had its first Es opening of the 
year on April 20th with 20/9 signals 
from Georgia, Alabama and Florida. 
As is usual for early season openings, 
not many stations were active. 

Art passes along a hint which is sure 
to be of interest to the many owners 
of Heath SB series gear: "Many opera- 
tors have had problems with the ale 
refusing to work or working only 
intermittently . * . on investigation I 
found that the pot used to control the 
voltage for ale action had three short 
bronze pieces eyeletted to the alumi- 
num connectors for ease of soldering 
the pot to the circuit board. When the 
two dissimilar metals are placed in 
contact with each other, oxidation 
occurs to such proportions as to cause 
intermittent ale action. This can be 
circumvented by bridging solder 
across the dissimilar metals or by 
substituting a good grade encapsulated 
pot in the board from the top for ease 
of adjustment, I passed this to W1ELP 
who in turn passed it to 10 operators 
of Heath equipment ... of the 10, it 
cured 8." 

As always, we need your reports of 
activity, your comments, answers to 
technical problems you have 
solved — and in fact anything which 
would be of interest to other active 6 
meter amateurs. If you have a local 
net going, let me know. If you make 
an unusual contact, drop me a line — 
others are interested in activity in 
your area. If you have a question 
about equipment, activity, a rig prob- 
lem, just ask. If I don't have the 
answer, someone among the reader- 
ship \m\\. If you have a TVI problem, a 
SASE will bring you a few hints on 
how to cure it, along with a list of 
manufacturers who provide high pass 
filters free or for a token sum. 

How would you like a new all solid 
state station running 120W PEP out- 
put and available NOW from commer- 
cial sources? Details next month. Also 
next month some very interesting 
comments on 6 meter activity in 
Australia from Geoff VK3AMK. 

. . -WA0ABI 



KQR DMQOU UKDU WTUPUPQZ, 



RKTZ PF IQOY BSOM FT2GPZJ 



PU? 



JULY 1973 




BY: Gus M. Browning, W4BPD 
Drawer "DX" 
Cordova, S.C. 29039 
I wonder how n^any of you have 
ever been to the Dayton (Ohio) Ham- 
vention ? This year it was the biggest 
ever, so they toid me. The attendance 
was something around 5,400 and \ can 
tell you that when you get that many 
hams together, you have the darndest 
time, shaking hands, slapping backs, 
yelling, Hello Ole Buddy, and an 
awful lot of other shenanigans, Peggy 
and I drove our Mustang to the Ham- 
vention loaded up to the brim with 
printed matter, QSL samples, etc. 
Everything we brought with us was ail 
given out in the first 4 hours Saturday 
morning. We could have passed out 
well over twice that many without 
any trouble. I tried to visit every 
display and spent well over two hours 
and only got to see about half of them* 
Wayne Green was as busy as a cat on 
a tin roof selling 73 magazines like 
they were going out of style ! At the 
price he was selling subscriptions (only 
$ 3,00) may have had something to do 
with the mad rush of business at the 
73 magazine booth. Wayne looked 
like a Harvard professor wtth those 
reading glasses (the upper part missing). 
There was so many DX'ers there that 
you couldn't stir them with a stick I 
The DX forum room was full of them, 
Stu Meyer, W2GHK did a very good 
job acting as MC for the entire forum. 
Two of the gang that went to Spratley 
Island were there with some very fine 
pictures of the entire trip. Sure did 
make my feet itch seeing them and 
their troubles getting there (3 trials, 
the last one a success.) The only thing 
on the island {before they got there) 
was a few million birds and so they 
say, the birds did a little "dumping", 
I suppose the birds didn't like intru* 
ers on their private island. It's a pity 
we cant hire these birds to do the 
same to intruders on our ham bands I 
Also present was the fellows that went 
to Juan Fernandez, St Felix and a few 
other islands. Many fine pictures and 
even movies was shown, all very inter- 
esting and making a fellow (like me) 
want to be on the other end of a big 
"pile-up" again, the sooner the better. 
A Hot of talk about maybe another 
big OX organization being formed one 
of these days, with by-taws that would 
make the books wide open to every- 
one, all the time. mayt>e some kind of 
an award for working '*DX", etc. You 
may (or may not) hear more about 
this as things progress or again all the 



talk may lie **day-d reams" by a few 
fellows that is hoping to put some 
new life blood in the art of DXing. 
Lets all hope for the best, because if 
its good for DX, its good for all of us. 
At the present time there are too many 
right up to the top in the DXCC and t 
guess we need something more or less 
new to get everyone again interested 

in DXing. Lets wait and see what 
develops (if anything at alL) 

So far our 73-73*73 certificate has 
been earned by the following fellows: 
(in the order as listed); 
No. 1 W4NJF 
No- 2 ZMIAMN 
No, 3 W5NQR 
No. 4 K4CKA 
No. 5 W2GA 
No. 6 WB6JQP 
No, 7 ZMIAMM 
No, 8 K2HWF 
No- 9 K6tLM 
No. 10 W2PMK 
No. 11 K4TWJ 
No. 12 PAfSALO 
No. 13 2L2GJ 
No. 14 VK6CH 
No, 15 WA8UUY 
No, 16 W8JFD 
No. 17 W5BPT/3 
No. 18 DKIYG 
No. 19 W3JZJ/8 
No, 20 WA2EJS 
No- 21 5W1AU 
No, 22 VK2BJL 
No. 23 WBJBHPL 
This is not too bad, but we have a 
number of certificates on hand that 
we will mail out to those of you who 
qualify by having worked 73 count- 
ries in the first 73 days of 1973. Send 
me a list, showing the stations you 
worked, the country, etc. Have your 
list certified by 3 hams or your clubs 
secretary, KEEP IN MIND this is a 
ONE TIME CERTIFICATE, you get 
it now or you NEVER GET IT, 
Please send along $ LOO to partly 
cover our costs and 1 will do the rest. 
AM WTW (Worked The World) certif- 
icates will have been mailed a month 
or so before you are reading this. 
The backlog of certificates work has 
now been caught up and I am QRX 
for anyone who has worked their 100 
or more countries. We need a copy of 
your countries alphabetically arranged 
BY PREFIXES, showing dates, bands, 
mode used and name of country, also 
certified as above along with the $ 1 .00. 
DO NOT SEND ME YOUR CARDS 
if you can have them certified. Your 
QSL cards should be on hand for this 
one and they should be certified. 
MOUNT ATHOS: I hope those of 
you who needed this NEW ONE had 
a QSO with the recent DXpedition 
to this spot, 1 had a number of fellows 
complaining that they never had a 
chance to work them due to what 
SEEMED to be caused by lack of 



activity. This seems hard to believe 
when you consider that TEN fellows 
was on the DXpedition to this rare 
country. I can assure you, that as far 
as I know this has not ever happened 
to me when I was on the other end on 
a DXpedition. and I AM ONLY ONE 
PERSON, without 9 others to "assist" 
me 1 I am not saying who is at fault, 

I only pass on what was told to me* 
I wonder what some of you "out 
there" think about this ? 

Please keep me in mind when you 
come across any DX news that I can 
use, but keep in mind that I have 60+ 
days date line. I need particularly 
news of any upcoming events.most 
certainly news of any DXpedition 
planned somewhat in the future and I 
always need news that is not "dated" 
Naturally I can always use your co- 
mments and suggestions to improve 
this column in this magazine, as long 
as they are of interest to other DXers. 
QSL INFO: 

ISIA - (Spratley Island via WIYRC 
SVIDB/A - Mt. Athos via 
SVIDB ' Const ant ine PsiloyanheSt 
P.O. Box 1442, Athens, Greece 
YKIOK: via Jenda Bubenicek 

Box 35, Damascus, Syria 
HB - Switzerland, worlds highest DX 
percentage country ! Thats right, 
according to a note I received from 
HB9J which savs: If you wii/ add up 
all the countries they have worked 
and divide this number by the number 
of hams in Switzerland you will have 
a higher number than any country in 
the world. I have took the word of 
HB9J that this is true, but it would 
be interesting to see some actual 
numbers to be 1007o convinced, hi- 
If you really want to work a LOT 
of countries try this: When you have 
received a card from any certain 
country DO NOT EVER WORK THAT 
COUNTRY AGAIN. Use your time 
LISTENING FOR NEW COUNTRIES, 
If nothing new h on spend that time 
LISTENING AND LISTENING ! 
A FEW DXING SUGGESTIONS: 

1. Do not ever call the DX station on 
the exact frequency the last station 
was on if its a split frequency deal, 
remember that many, many other 
stations are doing the same thing. 

2. Make your calls short, he knows his 
call GIVE HIM YOURS, be sure you 
use STANDARD PHONETICS. 

3. Obey HIS INSTRUCTIONS, he is 
running the show NOT YOU. 

4. Listen for a while and see how he 
SEEMS to be tuning, and select a 
frequency YOU THINK he will be 
tuning to. (Out guess the gang on this,) 

5. DO NOT start anything like rag- 
chewing, giving your "handle", or 
QTH, etc. NOT UNLESS he indicates 
that this is what he wants from you. 
DO NOT BE A DX HOG ! 

73 es DX, de -^***- W4BPD 



I 



8 



73 MAGAZINE 





% 



V^S WUi^ 











Although I am not from Missouri I 
do Ifkc to give people the benefit of 
the doubt. As you may know I have 
been active on FM for many years. In 
fact. I put up one of the fii3t repeaters 
when that era was just starting, I 
enjoy VHF, FM and repeaters, I enjoy 
the challenge of experimentation in 
one of the newest areas of our hobby. 
Oh, I like operating 20 CW and Siow 
Scan but the potential of VHF repeat- 
ers excites me. I get a little bored on 
the lower bands — not so on VHF. 
There are still so many areas of 
experimentation. 

I remember welJ two meters prior 
to Docket 18803. We were having a 
few growing pains, but on the whole 
the situation was not bad at aff. What 
problems we were h^/mg were being 
ironed out quite nicely by individual 
repeater owners or repeater councils. 
As I recall, nnost of us were simply 
asking for FCC recognition of FM, the 
clarifjcation of certain FCC rules and 
the implementation of a few new 
regulations to cover these areas of 
repeater operation where there sAere 
no rules. As you remember, before 
Docket 18803 the wword *'repeater" 
did not even show up in the rules and 
regulations of the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission as far as the 
amateurs were concerned. Anyway- 
we all expected 1S803 to provide us 
with some guidance in the licensing 
and installation of FM repeaters. Boy, 
were we ever wrong. Docket 18803 
hit us like a rude noise in church. 
Docket 18303 as it stands vtrtuaily 
means an end to experimentatjon on 
VHP as far as repeaters are concerned 
The rules are now so restrictive and so 
ridiculous as to rr^ke it almost impos- 
sible to get anything other than a 
simple (very simple) repeater licensed. 
Am I exaggerating? Hell, no. Those of 
you who live in California are well 
aware of the fantastic work being 
done in the way of repeater interlinks. 
It is possible to sit in downtown San 
Diego and talk all the way up the 
coast to Northern California and be- 
yond with your walkie. What a great 
public service these systerns are during 
times of emergerrcy. What about the 
Chicago Repeater Group with their 
fine machine? The one with the 
several receivers and transmitters tied 
together with an ingenious voting 
system - 1 could go on and on da^ 
scribing some great achievements on 
FM and repeaters but suffice it to say 
that these achievements must now 
stop. There is now no way for us to 
buiid the ultimate repeater. Why? 
Docket 18803 and A. Prose Walker, 
that is vwhy. I mentioned earlier Mis- 
souri and the fact that I have alv^^vs 
given people the benefit of the doubt. 
When Docket 18803 came out I tried 
to steer away from the hysteria being 




An 

Appreciation 

by Keith Lamonica 
W7DZZ/1 )^ 




generated by some. I hoped that the 
obvious faults of 18303 could be 
ironed out. I envisioned a modified 
78803 in the near future that would 
echo most needs and supply us with 
what we needed to continue virhat we 
had started on 2 meters* 

I quietly listened as A, Prose Walker 
told us how 18803 was the best thing 
that could have happened to FM. He 
said we should forget about the nega- 
tive side of 18803 and recognize the 
positive side. He said we can now let a 
fellow from anywhere, even if he has 
no license, come into our shacks and 
operate CW. Don't ask me. Tm still 
trying to figure that one out. Walker 
told us we should consider ourselves 
lucky that 18803 is not more restric- 
tive. He told us that we should appre- 
ciate the fact that vre have our own 
common carrier systems in tfie ham 
bands with which we can link up to 
telephone lines for autopatch. In the 
same breath he told us we will probab- 
ly lose our autopatch privileges be- 
cause some people are abusing them. 

Walker spent a great deal of time 
telling us how ham radio has changed. 
He accused us of all being a bunch of 
appliance operators with no desire to 
build or experiment. In the same 
breath, he told us that 18803 would 
stand* This virtually eliminates any 
experimentation and building in this 
phase of the hobby. 

We were told that if vm did not like 
tS803 we should petition the FCC to 
change the rules. Next he told us that 
all such petitions would be rejected 
without consideration since the FCC a 
few months ago rejected — across the 
board — all petitions to reconsider 
1S803. 

We were accused of letting the 
public down as far as emergency 
public seA/ice is concerned by not 
providing the communications need- 
ed. But he rejected the idea presented 
by one individual that repeaters 
should be able to interlink to provide 
emergency communications. After the 
Walker circus had been in progress 
for 56 minutes, I was actually getting 
a little sick to my stomach. Walker 
was threatening us. He told us that we 
had better shape yp or things might 
get worse. Actually: what Walker was 
saying to the many repeater owners 
and users present was. Tough — this ts 
the way I (Walker) v^nt it . . . this is 
the way it is going to be and there is 





not one damn thing you can do about 
it. 

Walker was scheduled to speak for 
one hour. Everyone expected a ques- 
tion and-answer period would be most 
fruitful. Howvever. Walker kept look- 
ing at his watch to make sure his talk 
lasted the full hour and that there 
would be no time for questions. Due 
to a mistake on his part, there were 
about five minutes left after his talk 
for questions. A few questions were 
put to Walker. The first: '*Mr. Walker, 
don't you think it unreasonable that 
one individual can shut down a repeat- 
er by simply talking on the output of 
the machine? Is it not possible for 
someone with a personal gripe to 
make it rough for hund reels of repeat- 
er users?'' To this Walker said no one 
has an exclusive right to a frequency. 
The fellow on the output has asmuch 
right to be there as the hundreds of 
repeater users. In other words, Walker 
opened the door to those very few 
who can now delight in shutting down 
B\i the repeatersthey want, simply by 
calling '"CO" on a repeater output 
frequency. Another fellow asked 
Walker why tS803 ts so restrictive. 
Walker had no good answer other than 
to imply that if we don't tike it, 
toughf It could be worse. 1 asked 
Walker if there was any way amateurs 
could change 18803. He said sure, all 
you had to do was file a petition. 1 
said, "Did yoo not say a few minutes 
ago that you had considered all there 
was to be considered and that you will 
reject all petitions for reconsidera- 
tion?" He said that they had con- 
sidered all there was to be considered 
and that petitions for reconsideration 
would be returned to the sender 

All I can tell you at>oui Walker is 
what 1 heard and saw. What 1 heard 
wa? the biggest pile of crock I have 
ever heard. What 1 saw, in my opinion, 
was an egotistical monarch delighting 
at the despair of the amateurs. 1 think 
Walker has a one-man, one-sided idea 
of what he thinks ham radio is all 
about and that nothing short of get 
ting him fired is going to save our 
hobby as we know it. Don't think for 
one minute thai Walker will stop with 
18803- He will not. 

Those of you who were at 
Rochester now know A. Prose Walker. 
Those of you who were not at 
Rochester, don't take my word for it. 
Ask around. Ask about A. Prose 
Walker. Then it is up to you — if you 
want to lose your hobby as we know 
it, fine. Just sit back and say to 
yourself that everything is okay. If 
you feel that your hobby is worth 
something to do, do something about 
it. Write your congressman, write 
Barry Goldwater, even write Spiro! 
Do something, for god's sake* 

. . .W7DXX/1 














JULY 1973 




f REPEATER UPDATE 

LISTENING 

94 76 88 73 70 64 82. 




^''^'^^'''''^^'^^■iiiMaait,:r..iiiii 




CT 


WA1PHX mm 


147.76- 


-14SJ6 


CT 


WBIAAi LUclifie^d 


147.49^ 


-146.49 


CT 


WA1PX0 Hojcbufv 


147JG- 


-147.3a 


lA 


WAIVVQ Qltumvya 




04-64 


IL 


WR9AA0 Miirfiliv^boro 




Z5-B& 


MA 


WR1AAC Salem 




3a-Ba 


MA 


WRIAAH Marlboro 
■xWAIQlZ 




Di-ei 


Ml 


WR8AAA Milford 


146.19- 


-14fiJ9 




ixK&SWW 


147.73- 


-14e.79 


NC 






26-SB 


NC 


WA4BVfW MtPfi|ih 


Z22.46- 


-ZZ4.06 


m 


WRZAAB Yonkefs 
eK-WB2SLQ 




31-91 


Ott 


Akron 




04-64 


OH 


WaiOO dslme 






PA 


Meattviile 




04-64 


UT 


waZAAA C«tlat City 




34-94 


CANADA 






lis 


V£1Hlt Frattr'sMfluntain 




21-83 



REPEATER APPLICATIONS 

In order to build a literature of 
acceptable methods of getting repeat- 
er, control station and auxiliary sta- 
tion licenses^ it would be greatly 
appreciated if anyone or any group 
managing to get a license application 
approved would send a copy of the 
application to us here at 73 Magazine. 
Well try to pass along the info we get 
in this way through the pages of 73 
and in person at hamfests and club 
meetings. Eventually we may be able 
to put out a handbook of accepted 
application answers and reduce getting 
a license through Mr. Walker to a 
rubber stamp procedure. 



* 






x-v 



or-^. 




Joe Kasser 

1701 East-West Highway, Apt 205 

Silver Spring MD 20910 

Thts month, let's look at the two 
meter FM activity in and around 
several areas of the USA. Consider 
Detroit: Detroit was recently de- 
scribed in an article in Time as the 
Murder Capital of the United States, 
Tirrw also reported that the majority 
of homicides were committed by 
friends or relatives of the deceased, so, 
if you are going to or through the 
Motor City, know who your friends 
are. Seriously though, Detroit is a 





w 



Due to the u nbefievable slow- 
ness on the part of the FCC to 
issue new repeater licenses, we 
have been forced to begin run- 
ning our Repeater Atlas Regis- 
tration Form every other month. 




^^^M^^^^^^^^^ 



great city in which to start a trip to 
Canada. 

There are two repeaters in Detroit. 
K8VLN on 04-64 and WB8CQS on 
16—76, both reqtJiring a 100 Hz sub- 
audible tone for access. The 04-64 
repeater will only relay tranmissions 
accompanied by the 100 Hz tone, 
while the 16—76 one will relay about 
3 to 5 seconds of transmission not 
accompanied by the tone, after having 
been keyed up by the tone. It is thus 
possible to tail-gate or work through 
the repeater provided someone else 
keeps keying it up every 3 to 5 
seconds or so. The 16—76 crowd are 
very friendly and usually don't mind 
doing the necessary for transients (or 
others). The sub-audible tone require- 
ments were added to the repeaters 
because they were experiencing inter- 
ference from users of the Toledo and 
Cleveland (Ohio) and Sarnia {Ontario) 
repeaters, 

WBSBDD 25-85, a carrier operated 
repeater in Clarkston, Michigan, about 
15 miles northwest of Detroit, is 
workable from the Motor City. I 
could get into it from the second floor 
in northwest Detroit using TR-22 
when on a recent trip. WB8CSC 
37—97 is in Ann Arbor, about 35 
miles southwest of the city and not 
too far from the airport. It has good 
coverage of the west side of Detroit, 
but you will normally need more than 
a TR-22 to get to it from Detroit. 

Now consider a different part of 
the country, the southeast. WA4DGM 
drove from Maryland to Florida a few 
months ago, working two meter FM 
with about 25W output. While on his 
indirectly routed trip he was able to 
work through a number of repeaters. 
For those intending to follow in his 
tire tracks (in England we'd say "fol* 
low in his footsteps/' but here every- 
body drives), here is a repeater by 
repeater replay of his trip. 

Leaving Washington talking on 
WB4QFP 31-91 and WA3SFG 
28—88, he drove down to Richmond, 
Virginia 34-94, From there he made 
his way along the Blue Ridge Parkway 
through Virginia, North Carolina and 
east Tennessee* working through the 
following repeaters whilst up in the 
mountains: WR4AAA 28-88 Sal is- 
bury NC, WA4NU0 34--94 Ashville 
and a 16-76 machine in the Ashville 
area, as well as a 16—76 in the 
Roanoke area. 



From the highest point in the 
Smokies he worked through K4HXD 
34—94 Knoxville TN and stayed with 
it over a long stretch of road. Continu- 
ing on the trip he worked through 
W4RFR 34-94 Nashville and K4IKU 
34—94 Huntsville AL. For a while no 
repeaters were heard, until WA5ZHD 
34—94 Baton Rouge and a 34-76 
machine in New Orleans. There is also 
W5UK, a 34-94 whistle-up repeater 
in that city. Driving along the Gulf of 
Mexico, the next repeater contacted 
was the 34-94 machine in Mobile AL 

Florida was found to be full of 
repeaters. He found a 34-76 (PL or 
1,8 kHz burst) in Fort Walton Beach 
near Pensacola and WB4HAE 34-76 
in Tampa, which could be accessed 
from St, Petersburg, When he got to 
Miami he found WB4HAA on 34-76. 

His northbound journey began at 
Miami. Driving up the Atlantic coast, 
Merrit Island provided coverage in the 
Cape Canaveral area. He also worked 
through Daytona Beach 34—94 and 
WB4QEL 16-76, Oriando. WB4QEL 
could also be accessed from the park- 
ing tot at Walt Disney World. 

Driving north out of Florida noth- 
ing was heard until he came into range 
of the 34—94 repeater in Charleston 
SC, and nothing from there until 
Fayetteville NC 16-76. 

WA4DGM pointed out that he 
passed through many places during 
normal working hours, so it is very 
po^ible some repeaters were not on 
the air at ^e time he drove through. 
Still, he enjoyed his trip, and if you 
do follow his tire tracks , . . have fun. 

G3ZCZ/W3 



1 




^&0kiA 



Bill Pasternak WA2H VK/6 
14732 Blythe Street # // 
Panorama City CA 

Dateline Los Angeles, May 9, 1973: 
Another chapter in the history of 
amateur FM communications was 
written into the books at 4:00 P.M, 
P.D.S.T. when the WA1KGS repeater 
in Waltham MA was successfully 
linked via telephone with the 
WA6TDD Mt. Wilson repeater in Los 
Angeles. To our knowledge this is the 
first time that two open repeaters 
separated by some 3,000 miles were 



10 



73 MAGAZINE 



REPEATER OWNERS 



Don't Take Chances. SENTRY offers custom made crystals made exactly 
to your specifications. When it comes to crystals for your repeater, BUY THE 
BEST -SENTRY. 



T 






'.'-.■.'.•.'•J 



r'y.'J.'J, 



•.'.•. 'Z•>.^.•■3^ 






-.i.'-.'.'.i'-. 



■■■■^ 



.■QX- 



smm^i 






^^^^^MM^^ 



.:■:->^ 



m^ 






REPEATER USERS 



If you want reliable access to the repeaters in your area, you want and 
need SENTRY CRYSTALS. SENTRY CRYSTALS are custom made for your 
rig. We don't stock a large quantity of crystals for a certain frequency and 
hope you can tweak them to frequency in your rig. We do offer FAST service 
on crystals made especially for you and your rig. If you want refiabfe, 
on-frequency operation, tNSIST ON SENTRY. 




SENTRY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

Crystal Park, Chiclcasha, Oklahoma 73018 

PHONE: (405) 224 6T80 

TWX -9 10^30-6425 



JULY 1973 



11 



■■■ 



interconnected in order to give the 
users of both a chance to exchange 
calls and get to know one another 

At first it sounded like 20 meters 
on a Sunday afternoon, but George 
K1M0N and Wayne K1MUC, who 
acted as control in Waltham, and 
yours truly acting as Los Angeles 
control, were able to improvise a 
system that allowed all participating 
stations to get in a transmission or 
two, Among those on hand for this 
event was Wayne W2NSD/t. I was 
personally delighted that he was in- 
volved and thankful for the encour- 
agement he has gfven me in this 
project, 

Thou^ I have yet to go through 
my log tape, I can accurately estimate 
that in addition to Wayne, some fifty 
other stations participated in today's 
bit of ham history. To any of those 
who tried to get into the system and 
couldn't make it for one reason or 
another, we do apologize. This, how- 
ever, is only tfie beginning and the 
future holds more* The system has 
been proven viable and the road is 
now open for others. A few years ago 
no one even dreamed that a two watt 
hand unit would span a continent- 
Today a ham at a restaurant in Boston 
using an HT can talk to a mobile on 
the Hollywood Freeway. Dreams do 
come true. 

Some of the amateurs calling in on 
the historic roundtable were 
WA1QNN, WAtlML, WA1 LMJ, 
K1ETT, W1BHD (op of WR1AAA), 
WA1LSD, W1YHM, WA1GXN, 
WA1HXZ, K1HBJ, WA6JGW; 
K6BWJ, W6UTE, K6LQK, 
K6PFW-all in addition to KIMON 
and K1MUC of the WAIKGS repeat- 
er, and, of course, W2NSD/1 and 
WA2HVK/a 

I have spent a number of spring 
seasons on the west coast, but by far 
this one is the most colorful I've seen. 
It's also an anniversary for us; six 
months in our new adopted home 
state. Sharon and I were discussing the 
past six months the other night, and 
we both agree we made the right 
move. We're happy here and are going 
to stay, 

A recent event out here was the 
surprise party given by members of 
the Pallisades Amateur Radio Club 
(WB6ZD1) for one of their members 
who is about to be married. The lucky 
couple is Ward Hill WA6FUH and his 
soon-TO-be bride. Barb Goldie* This 
party was the best secret ever kept 
among the ZDl members, and was a 
real surprise to Ward and Barbara, The 
event was held at the home of John 
WA6ABW, and a quick head count 
revealed that some fifty people 
showed up to help make the evening 



merry. T have said before that amateur 
radio breeds good friendships. 

While on this subject, may we also 
send congratulations to another newly 
married couple, Warren and Lorraine 
Andresen, Mr. and Mrs, WA6JMM. 
They have just returned from their 
honeymoon traveling throughout 
Arizona, and Warren reports that most 
of the repeaters in the Phoenix area 
are back in operation* Though for 
obvious reasons Warren spent little 
time hamming this trip, he did come 
up with the following: Both 34/94 
and 16/76 in Phoenix are back on the 
air, though they operate on a limited 
time schedule. The 16/76 channel is 
mainly for auto-patch use while 34/94 

is the general meeting frequency* 
Coverage at this time is not good as it 
could be since these machines are 
located within the city on an office 
building rather than at their old 
mountain top location. Both machines 
operate under the call K7V0R, 
Warren also tells us that there are 
plans for a new wide coverage moun- 
taintop machine to be put on 04/64 in 
the near future. He could not get an 
exact date. At this time it leaves only 
the 450 MHz machine out of opera- 
tion, and it is my hope that by the 
time this article reaches you, it too 
will be back on the ain Good luck, 
Phoenix- 
Warren also tells us about another 
repeater in Arizona with near fantastic 
coverage* This one, K7EIK 
(146/16-146.76) is located in King- 
man and is usable not only through- 
out Arizona, but as far away as Las 
Vegas and in parts of southeastern 
California as wplL Sure wish I had that 
pair of crystals in my RCA when we 
were driving cross-country* That's 
what I call coverage* Warren says the 
people on this machine realty went 
out of their way to be friendly and 
helpful. 

WR6AAA, the Catalina repeater, is 
on the air and open for general use* 
The frequencies: 147,69 in, 147,09 
out. Coverage: well, the word fantas- 
tic would be an understatenrtent! 

Tlie new NTW 220 machine is 
coming along, Warren has already fin- 
ished the ID unit and Bill just about 
has the transmitter strip ready to go. I 
do not know how well the other 220 
machines that are being brewed up are 
coming along. Six meter AM and SSB 
has been fairly active and in tuning 
around the band I have located a 6 
meter FM repeater. Perhaps those who 
own it will contact me and give me 
more information on it* I know it's on 
Mt. Wilson, but that's about all ttie 
information I have. 

, . .WA2HVK/6 




CONTESTS 




Tom DfS/'ase W88KZD 
708 6 ih Avenue 
Steuben]// ffe OH 43952 

Contest Calendar 



July 28-30 

Aug. 4^5 
Aug* 18-19 

Sept. 15-17 

Sept 29-Oct 1 



CW County Hunters 

Contest 

Illinois QSO Party 
N J. QSO Party 
Washington State 
QSO Party 
Delta QSO Party 



This Month 
CW County Hunters Contest 

From 0000 GMT July 28 to 0600 
GMT July 30, 1973. Call "CO CH/' 

Exchange QSO number, category (if 
portable or mobile. If portable send 
'P'-if mobile 'M'), RST, State (or 
province or country) and county (if 
U,S. station). Stations may be worked 
once per band and again if the station 
has changed counties. Stations chang- 
ing counties may repeat contacts for 
QSO points, QSO's with fixed stations 
are 1 point; QSO's with portable or 
mobile are 3 points. Multiply total 
OSO points times total of U*S- coun- 
jes worked. Portables and mobiles 
calculate their score on the basis of 
total contacts within a state. Sugges- 
ted frequencies are 3575, . 7055, 
14070, 21070, and 28070 kHz. Ap- 
propriate trophies and certificates will 
be awarded. Logs must show category, 
date/time in GMT, station worked, 
exchanges, band, QSO points, location 
and claimed score. AH entries with 
100 or more QSO's must include a 
check sheet of counties worked or will 
be disqualified. Enclose a large SASE 
for results. Logs must be postmarked 
by Sept 1, 1973 and sent to: CW 
County Hunters Net, c/o Jeffrey P* 
Bechner W9MSE, 64 North Pioneer 
Parkway, Fond du Lac, WI 54935, 

August 
lltniosQSO Party 

From 2000 GMT August 4 to 2400 
GMT Au^st 5, 1973. Stations may be 
worked once per band and mode. 
Illinois stations contact any station, 
out-of-staters work only Illinois* Score 
1 point per QSO and multiply total 
QSO points times total Illinois coun- 
ties worked. Illinois stations use total 
of states ^including Illinois), provinces 
and countries (including USA) worked 
for their multiplier, If power input 
never exceeds 5 watts, multiply score 
by 3, Also, each group of eight con- 
tacts with the same Illinois county 
counts as an extra multiplier. Remem- 
ber, USA, Canada, Hawaii and Alaska 
count again as states, Exchange QSO 



1 



12 



73 MAGAZINE 



mjfnber, RST, and state, province or 
country (county for Illinois stations). 
Suggested frequencies are 3560, 2725, 
3900, 7060, 7125, 7260, 14060, 
14275, 21060, 21110, 21360, 28060, 
28160, and 28660, Phone on the 
hour, CW on the half hour. Appro- 
priate awards. Logs must show date 
and time in GWT, stations worked, 
exchanges, band, mode, and claimed 
score. A separate summary sheet is 
required, showing operator's name 
and address in block letters, whether 
single or multi-op, QSO points, multi- 
pliers, and score claimed. Logs must 
be postmarked by Sept 15, 1973 and 
sent to: Radio Amateur Megacycle 
Society, K9CJU, 3620 H. Oleander 
Ave., Chicago IL 60634, Enclose 
SASE for results if desired. 

Not much to report this month, but 
this is the first one of 73's new regular 
contest column, and it does take time 
to get going strong* You may look 
forward to bigger and better columns 

in tne months to come. As editor, I 
welcome any and all comments, sug- 
gestions, and questions about contests 
atid about this column. If you have 
information on a particular contest, 
please make sure I have it at least 
three months prior to the date of the 
contest (the sooner the better, 
though). All correspondence should 
go to my address, which is: Tom 
DiBiase, 708 6th Ave., Steubenville 
OH 43952, With your support, this 
cofumn has the potential to become 
the finest ham radio contest column 
ever to hit the pages of a magazine. 

Until next month, good luck In the 
contest pileupsl 

Tom WB8KZD 




Thtt Humburglar 

STRIKES AGAIN I 

Bill Grenfell W4GF is offering a 
reward for informatipn leading to the 
recovery of the following equipment 
stolen from his car at Dayton OH 
onApril 29th: Yaesu FT 101 
s/n82G12279/CW, 1.8 MHz & CW 
filter installed; Regency HR-2, 
s/n03- 203 0, xtals 147.00, 
1 46.97/94/9 1 /76/37/34/3 1/12 MHz, 
Contact him at 7216 Valleycrest 



Blvd., Annandale VA 22003. Phone 
704-560 5229. 

A Clegg 27B, sen no, 27013-1068 

was also lost by Bob Edelman W2BXL 
last April 29th. His address is 408 
Valley Run Dr., Cherry Hill NJ and he 
may be reached at 609-665-4321 dur- 
ing the day and 609-667 3645 at 
night. 

The following gear w/as stolen from 
WB2DEWS car on May 11: Standard 
826 MA ser, no. 208078 with P.T. 
mike {new style) and 11 crystals 
including 1 47.21 A210; 147,81 A210; 
1 6/76; 147.93A330; 147,99/.390; 
25/85* The 9th position has a bad 
crystal socket and the channel selector 
dial on the number 7 position has a 
deep scratch on it. Johnson Messinger 
111 w/mike, converted to 10 meters 
with 28.730 and 28.650 crystals in- 
stalled. Both rigs have "Stolen from 
WB2DEW" engraved in many places 
on the chassis and circuit boards. 
Contact Andy Drautz WB2DEW at 4 
Pine Rd,. Kings Park, N,Y, 11754. 

Lilt from Past fstu^i: 

Mfr., Moi^l, S9r, No. Owner fnu€ 

AF6S Mo 10888 K5LKL 1/73 

PMB8 No. 1091t 

M1Q70 pMiT supply 

Trio TR2200 No, 241969 WA2ZeV 1/73 

ClB« 22er No. 190O-57S WIDHP 2/73 

Stlndard 826JVI,No. 1 12007 WA8PCG 3/73 



FM27S No. 27013^1141 


W2LNr 


4/73 


FM l44lOLhkj. F459 


WA6W0A 


4/73 


NPC lQ7ni pwr supply 






2, SAJ-lPL Onar^ Gen*^ 






No. 327885 






R4BNO. 11578G 


WASOVK 


«/73 


T4XBNO. 17801 G 






W4 WAttmeter No, 8390 






Swan 250 No. F1S4806 






Swan ac pwr. iup. No. 0653B56 




HR 2 No, (M^C2879 


W6GSR 


6/73 


SB 34 No. 211828 






STO 826 No. 01 1268 


WA2FSD 


6/73 


HT220 No, GJ7327 


Stat© Unw, 


6/73 




of NY fAlbany} 










HR-2B 




Keeping up with the amateur tradi- 
tion of technological advancement, 
Regency has hit the market with a 
third generation model of the original 
HR-2 "the HR-2B. 

A quick look at the front panel tells 
the story; Aside from the more pro- 
fessional looking bfack panel, the 



crystal switch Is now numbered con- 
secutrvely from one to twelve. The old 
arrangement allowed only 6 crystal 
pairs to be installed, with 6 extra 
positions on the panel switch for 
re-pairing the same crystals. Regency 
has increased the number of separate 
receive and transmit channels to 12 
for the obvious reason that most 2m 
activity is via standard frequency pairs 
through repeaters. The switch can still 
be wired so you can use a crystal 
twice, but the fact remains, the 
HR-2B gives you twice as many 
crystal sockets! 

The transmit crystals used in the 
HR-2B are 8 MHz as opposed to the 6 
MHz rocks required by its pre- 
decessors. This is a reasonable change 
at a time when most 2m equipment 
uses 8 MHz as a starting point and 
increases your chance of being able to 
walk into a radio store and find a 
particular crystal in stock. 

The output is about the same as the 
HR'2A, 15-20 watts. Added, how- 
ever, is the Hl/LO power switch which 
reduces the pov\er output to 1 watt 
This feature h becoming increasingly 
popular with FMers because it allows 
a standard mobile or base station rig 
to double as an over-the-shoulder 
portable unit when connected to an 
external battery pack. That one watt 
level also lets you keep the battery 
size down to reasonable proportions* 

The receiver is still rated at the 
excellent figure of 0.35 mV for 20 dB 
of quieting and the selectivity has 
been improved by the addition of a 
series "E" filter in the i-f for less 
cross-channel interference. 

For a rig that has been improved 
and made more versatile. Regency is 
asking the same price . . . 
S229.00-this includes the HR-2B, 
mike, crystals for 94—94 simplex and 
mobile mounting bracket. 

For more information write 
Regency Electronics Inc., 7900 
Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis IN 
46226. 

CLEGG FM-21 




When the Clegg engineers sat down 
to design a 220 rig, they most certain- 
ly at one point went the route that is 
the industry standard — one crystal 
controlling the transmitter and 
another for the receiver. That the 



JULY 1973 



13 



system works well is att&sted by al- 
most every commercial FM rig on the 
market today. In fact, on 2m, any 
system that does not allow indepen- 
dent selection of transmit and receive 
frequencies via separate crystals is 
bound to cause trouble when trying to 
work into oddball-paired repeaters. 

At one point however, someone at 
CI egg with sense realized that the 220 
MHz was fast becoming or- 
ganized , . * everyone was agreeing on 
a standard 1.6 MHz spacing between 
the inputs and outputs of repeaters. 
Since a transceiver was now being 
designed to work within an accepted 
S€t of frequencies, the designers de- 
vised an ingenious system that sets the 
transmitter output on one frequency 
and gives you the choica of receiving 
on that same frequency for simplex or 
1*6 MHz higher for repeater 
work . < . all with a single crystal! This 
is accomplished by judicious mixing 
during both modes. 

On transmit, the switch selected 
channel crystal (45 MHz for example) 
is first doubled to 90 MHz. Then it is 
mixed with a crystal controlled 20.5 
MHz signal to produce 110,5 MHz 
which is ready for doubling again to 
221 MHz. 

The receive process is slightly more 
::omplicated. The already doubled 
channel crystal frequency is doubled 
again to 180 MHz and injected into 
the first mixer. If you are working 
simplex, the 221 MHz received signal 
will be mixed with the LO signal to 41 
MHz in the first mixer, and it is mixed 
again with a 30.3 MHz signal in the 
second mixer to ready it for the 10,7 
i-f. If you are working in the repeat 
mode, the receiver will need the capa- 
bility to handle a signal that is 1.6 
MHz higher. This is accomplished by 
switching in a 31.9 MHz oscillator to 
replace that on 30,3 - thus the se* 
cond mixer can now only convert a 
42,6 MHz signal to 10.7, Working 
backward to the antenna, or adding 
the original LO signal of 180 MHz to 
42.6, gives you the signal that will be 
accepted and received — 222.6 MHz, 
which is exactly 1.6 MHz hi^er than 
the transmit frequency of 221 MHz 
produced by tiie same 45 MHz crystal. 

The receiver is rated at 0,25 ^V for 
12 dB SI NAD with adjacent channel 
rejection down 50 dB at 40 kHz, The 
audio output is an adequate 1.5W, 

The transmitter delivers 8— 10W 
output and is protected against any 
rash swr changes due to forgetfulness 
on the part of the hand that usually 
screws a coax connector down tight. 
The supplied noise cancelling mike 
works in conjunction with a clipping 
circuit that is adjustable to provide up 
to 10 dB of clipping action and 
deviation may be set anywhere from 
to 7 kHz, 



Crystals aren't a problem as they 
can be ordered on a 24-hour basis 
from Clegg for S4.95. The unit comes 
ready for 6 channel operation and 5 
extra channels, can be added with an 
inexpensive conversion kit. One 
needn't worry whether or not 220 will 
remain with 1,6 MHz spacing, for the 
rig can be easily modified for receive/ 
transmit channel spacings from A to 3 
MHz. For more information, write 
Clegg Division, intematianat Signat 
and Control Corp.^ 3050 Hemp land 
Road, Lancaster PA 17607. 

TAPE SOLDER 




Ever wish you could solder a con- 
nection with a match? Now you can 
with Archer Tape Solder, from Radio 
Shack, Simply twist your wires to- 
gether, wrap them with a piece of 
Tape Solder, and melt it with a match, 
candle or cigarette lighter flame. No 
soldering iron needed. Tape Solder 
seems ideal for on-the-spot wiring and 
repairs, slicing wire, fixing rotor cables 
half-way up a tow^r or any normal 
soldering job out of reach of a solder- 
ing iron. Archer Tape Solder comes in 
a resealabie plastic pouch of 100 
pre-cut pieces for 89^, 

Tape Solder is available from more 
than 1800 Rsdio Shack and Allied 
Radio Stores in all 50 states and 
Canada, 

LOW PRICED DEVIATION METER 



reading meter. Deviation of any FM 
transmitter can be accurately adjusted 

between 5 kHz and 25 kHz in seconds 
using voice or tone modulation. 

The Model ECM-5 closely follovjs 
the circuits used in professional equip- 
ment except frequency selection is 
crystal controlled. This allows the 
elimination of many expensive circuits 
needed when frequency selection is by 
VFO. The net result was a tremendous 
reduction in price without sacrificing 
quality . . . $75.00 less batteries and 
crystals! 

The frequency selecting crystals are 
the popular, subminiature type used 
in today's FM ri^. These crystals were 
chosen for their low price and avail- 
ability. 

The peak reading meter has a 
special time constant circuit that 
causes the needle to deflect upscale 
rapidly and downscaie slowly. This 
allows the needle to follow voice 
peaks easily and increases the 
accuracy of readings when checking 
deviation using voice nnodulation. 

Other features incfude built-in or 
external antenna, all solid state con- 
struction, battery powered by inex- 
pensive A A pencells, and a battery 
condition indicator 

For more information, write £CM 
Corporation, 412 N. Weinbach Ave,^ 
Evansville. Indiana 477 1 1. 

NEW VOLTAGE REGULATORS 



*o *-■'/'** C^\'f^ 






y 





The ECM Corporation has an- 
nounced a deviation meter designed 
especially for the ham. The ECM-5 
covers all ham bands betv\feen 52 MHz 
and 450 MHz, and features a peak 



Many times the need arises for a 
simple, low cost voltage regulator 
which can provide a nioderate amount 
of current without complex current- 
boosting circuitry. The MC7 805/24 
series positive voltage regulators can 
supply in excess of 1 amp at nominal 
voltages of 5, 6, 8, 12, 15, 18 or 24 
volts (as designated by the last two 

digits of the device number). How- 
ever, unlike most voltage regulator 
ICs, these devices have only three 
terminals - Input, Output and 
Ground* They require no extemal 
conponents! They can be easily 
attached to a heat sink surface with a 
machine screw through the hole in the 
package to attain higher maximum 
power dissipation. The maximum in- 
put voltage is 35 volts on all types 
except for the MC7824 which is 
speced at 40 volts. 



14 



73 MAGAZINE 



All seven members of this inexpen- 
sive regular family are presently avail 
able from warehouse stock. 

For further infoimation please con^ 
tact the Technical Information Cerh 
ter. Motorola Inc., Senu conductor 
Products Division, P^O, Box 20912, 
Phoenix, Arizona 85036, 

LEESERVfSET 





GI6YM AWARD 

1973 is the golden jubilee of the 
city of Belfast YMCA Radio Club 
GI6YM, Northenn Ireland, and the 
members are celebrating the occasion 
with a number of special activities. 

This club jubilee also happily coin- 
cides with the 75th anniversary of the 
wireless tests carried out by Marconi 
and Kemp on behalf of Lloyd's, be- 
tween Ballycastle (Co, Antrim) and 
Rathlin Island off the North Irish 
coast, to report ships passing the N*E. 
corner of Ireland* 

These tests were successful and 
established the "first public service" 
of wireless in the year 1898. 

To commemorate both these mile* 
stones, the Belfast YMCA Club will 
issue an award certificate between 1st 
July and 30th June, 1974. 

Activity from GI6YM will be at a 
high level throughout the period. In 
conjunction with members of 
GI3FFF, the Ballymena Amateur 
Radio Club, a special station wilf 
operate from Baltycastte on all hf 
bands during the first week in July 
with the call letters G83MKB 
(Marconi Kemp Ballycastle). 

It is known at this point that one 
requirement for the award will be 
contact with both the YMCA Club 
Station (GISYM) and the Special Ac- 
tivity Station at Ballycastle during the 
period of the town's Marconi -Kemp 
celebrations. This award will also be 
available to shortwave listeners, 

HAMFEyrERS 

The Hamf esters 39th annual ham- 
fest and picnic will be held Sunday, 
August 12, 1973, at Santa Fe Park, 
91st and Wolf Road, Willow Springs, 
Illinois, southwest of Chicago* Ex- 
hibits for OM's and XYL's, famous 
Swappers Row, For information con- 
tact John Raiger K9DRS, 8919 Golf- 
view, Oriand Park IL 60462. Tickets: 
write Joseph Poradyla WA9tWU. 5071 
So. CAIifornia AVe,, Chicago IL 
60629. 



JUNCTION, TEXAS BAR B^Q 

The third annual Amateur Radio 
Appreciation Day will be held in 
Junction, Texas July 29, 1973. This is 
3 FREE Bar-B-Q for anyone holding 
an amateur license, and their family. 
HAMBURGLAR HQ FOUND! W7AYQ The day is sponsored by the Kimble 
s$eins to think he fms found the h&ad office County Chamber of Commerce to 
in Florence, Or^on. show its appreciation of the many 



When sonrtething goes wrong with 
the test setup for the 73 Crystal Bank, 
it has to be fixed quickly. Here's 
Wayne using the Lee Labs Dynamic 
Sefviset in one of its many functions 
as an rf sigiat tracer. The Serviset has 
the ability to trace rf and af signals, 
check ac or dc voltage levels and 
substitute resistance and capacitance 
values by simply changing a test lead. 
It takes the place, on a basic level, of 
at least three or four expensive pieces 
of test equipment. 

The unit is entirely self-contained, 

whteh means the conJs that usually 

dangle and cause problems in most 

test setups are eliminated. Printed 

circuits are tested with ease for the 

main test point is long enough to get 

into the tight spots where a clip lead 

cannot go* 

For more information about this 

versatile piece of test gear write Lee 
Electronic Labs, 88 Evans Street, 

Watertovm MA 0217Z 




public services and disaster assistance 
amateur radio operators provide. 

For complete information contact 
WB5BBT, Lewis Ransom, Junction TX 
76849 or the Kimble County Cham- 
ber of Commerce, 603 Main, Junc- 
tion, 



TWO RIVERS MEET 

The Two Rivers Amateur Radio 
Club will conduct its ninth annual 
hamf est on Sunday, July 22, 1973. 
The event has grown to be one of the 
largest hamfesrs in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, and this year will be held at the 
Green Valley Fire Department 
grounds, off U.S. Route 30, near 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, For com- 
plete details write Robert E, Zimmer 
WA30GS, 205 Commonwealth Ave,, 
West Mifflin PA 15122. 

TURKEY RUN-FEST 

The Wabash Valtey Amateur Radio 
Association will hold the 27th annual 
VHP picnic and hamf est on Sunday, 
July 29, 1973, at Turkey Run State 
Park near Marshall, Indiana, Registra- 
tion is $1.50 or 4 for $5.00, with no 
advance registration. There will be 
prizes, XYL Bingo, huge flea market 
and plenty of good fellowship. Talk-in 
is on 94/94 and 52.525 MHz. 

SWAPFEST 73 

The South Milwaukee ARC pre- 
sents its annual hamf est on Saturday, 
July 14, at the VFW Post 434, 9327 
Shepard Ave. in Oak Creek, Wiscon- 
sin. Admission is $1,00. There will be 
food and prizes available. Talk- in on 
146.94. 

MT. AIRY PICNIC 

The Mt Airy VHP Radio Club 
(Pack Rats) will hold the 18th annual 
family day and picnic, Sunday, Aug- 
ust 12 (rain date August 19) at the 
Fort Washington State Park, Flour- 
town. The event features games, enter- 
tainment, and free soda. Talk-in sta- 
tions will be on 50.2 MHz AM, 5Z525 
MHz FM, and 146.52 MHz FM. 

INTERNATIONAL HAMFEST 

The 10th annual international ham- 
fest will be held July 7 and 8, 1973, at 
the International Peace Garden be- 
tween Dunseith, North Dakota and 
Boissevain, Manitoba, This event has 
grown from a small family picnic to a 
gathering of radio operators and their 
families from California, Washington, 
Minnesota and Saskatchewan as well 
as from North Dakota and Manitoba, 
There will be activities, prizes and 
general hamfest fun. Contact Mel 
Mc Knight WA0SJB, 909 Main Sl, 
Bottineau, ND 58318 for further de- 
tails. 



JULY 1973 



15 



W2NSD/1 continued from psge 4 

Walkfr came down hard on mall 
order licenses — saying that a high 
percentage were fraud ulently ob- 
tained. This was a bitter pill to have to 
accept out there in Western New 
York -^ where a fair percentage of the 
amateurs present at the banquet were 
Conditional licensees. Obviously there 
is no way to know this for sure, so 
this is merely a matter of opinion. In 
talking with Walker I've found that 
this opinion appears to have been 
derived from the number of Condi- 
tional and Technician licensees who 
refuse to appear before an FCC exami- 
ner when called in- 

As t have pointed out before, there 
are other possible and reasonable ex- 
planations for this and the assumption 
of guilt on the part of those who 
default is unfair. Onfy about 50% 
(tops) of the licensed amateurs are 
active in the hobby. Can we expect an 
inactive amateur to go to all the work 
it takes to prepare for the license 
exam? By the time he's gotten a book 
with the latest questions and answers 
in it and started to bone up, the date 
for appearing is past. Of course his 
decision to give up without trying 
could be based upon the tremendous 
changes in the 6xam since the time 
when he took it — which in the case 
of most Conditionals was many years 
ago. Many years. One look at the solid 
state questions — the RTTY ques- 
tions — the sideband questions — and 
it's back to stamp collecting or wench- 
ing. 

How many wives will be interested 
in the trip to the FCC office? A great 
many hams have coached their wives 
so they could pass the exams on 
memory alone. Naturally this short 
term memory material is long gone 
and, if the wife has to do it over, she 
will have to start from scratch. The 
answer is phooey. 

The word is getting around too of 
the high percentage of hams who are 
flunking their re-exam. In some re* 
ported cases over 90% of those who 
did make the try to hold their license 
were failed. To say that amateurs, 
somte with over twenty years of hanv 
mins — some experienced build- 
ers ^ are upset over being failed is a 
gross understatement How would you 
like it? 

As far as I know from talking with 
Walker most or all of these chaps are 
considered by him to be obvious cases 
of fraudulent licensing. Oldtimers who 
have even the slightest question in 
their mind about what Conditionals 
and Techs face in the present day 
license exam would do well to get 3 
copy of the 73 license study course 
book for the Genera! License, The 
book simplifies the understanding of 



the material — still, it is going to take 
some time. 

The introduction to Walker opened 
some eyes. FMers have been wonder- 
ing what possible reason there was for 
alt those antenna radiation patterns 
for the repeater antennas. The intro 
explained it — Walker has been work- 
ing up until taking over as chief of the 
amateur and citizens division of the 
FCC making such patterns — it is a 
special Interest of his. Now he has the 
amateurs over a barrel and is forcing 
them to provide him with data for his 
own pet project at the expense of the 
amateurs. No other explanation makes 
any sense. 

And just in case anyone present 
thought that they sornehow might be 
able to manage to live with the regula- 
tions Walker has afready put out, he 
hinted strongly at some he has in the 
works - like the type acceptance of 
ham gear — a power/bandwidth limita- 
tion - stuff like that. Then, with a 
smirk, he threw down the gauntlet to 
the ARRL by suggesting that if we 
didn't like it, sue the FCC and see 
where that would get us* 

It was a bitter pill for those gather- 
ed at Rochester for fun and camara- 
derie to have to sit at the banquet and 
listen to Walker drone <m with his 
prepared speech for one full hour, 
taking amateur radio to task from 
every angle and then going over the 
talk a second time and repeating 
everything just to make sure the mes- 
sage was loud and clear. Even if the 
things Walker was saying were true the 
whole talk was in exceptionally bad 
taste- 
Walker revealed himself to the en- 
tire group as an opinionated, close- 
minded cantankerous old man who, 
through some dreadful bureaucratic 
error, has been put into the worst 
possible job. 

After the banquet the hamfest 
committee, despite being angry at 
Walker speaking for one hour when he 
was supposed to talk for 20 minutes, 
managed to spirit him quickly out of 
the hall past the smell of hot tar and 
the sound of clucking chickens* 




FENCED IN 

Repeater groups have run into the 
biggest wall of paperwork in the his* 
tory of amateur radio. Attempts at 
penetrating the wall have been vigor- 
ously fought off by Walker with inde- 



cision and vacillation. This is most 
frustrating when you consider that all 
of the decisions have to come from 
Walker — he is the only gate in the 
wall -and he is becoming known as 
the Walkergate of the FCC, 

The Walkergate is closed most of 
the time — about 95% of the repeater 
applications have been refused. Per- 
haps an investigation is in order. Many 
clubs are asking more and more point- 
ed questions about the need for show- 
ings on antenna patterns — they want 
to know whether these are for person- 
al private projects of Walker and 
whether they might be material for a 
book he personally has in the works* 
This is the first explanation that 
makes even a shred of ^nse, even 
though it raises serious questions of 
impropriety on Walker's part. 

The Walkergate has closed on re- 
mote base operation as ft has been 
developed over the years, shutting 
down some of the most innovative 
amateur work ever set up. 

The Walkergate has closed on cross* 
band repeaters —and is closing on all 
crossband developments — despite the 
hobbling effect this obviously will 
have on amateur ingenuity and emer- 
gency service. 

The Walkergate appears to be 
swinging open to accept the limitation 
of twenty feet above existing struc- 
tures for amateur towers and antennas 
and also appears to be opening wide 
for giving nrrore channels to those poor 
crowded CB'ers. 

TWO METERS GOING THE 
CB ROUTE? 

The two meter repeater regulations 
are, to quote ARRL staffer McCoy, 
'*asinine/' The feet is that you will 
not find one knowledgeable FMer 
who does not agree with this estima- 
tion. 

The result of this is that repeater 
councils are now thinking nrK)re and 
more in terms of outright violation of 
some of the new regulations. They 
protested the new rules as soon as 

they were announced, but Walker 
refused to even acknowledge the ama- 
teurs - throwing out each and every 
plea for reconsideration. Thus the 
worst regulations ever put through by 
the Commission were followed up by 
the biggest slap in the face amateurs 
have ever received* 

Amateurs felt that this was one hell 
of a way to be rewarded for being the 
most well behaved group of licensees 
the FCC had. On the one hand ama- 
teurs could see the CBers running 
wild, with the Commission turning 
their face away from the mess they 
had generated — and even getting 
ready to reward this bunch of hooli- 
gans with a good part of an un- 
developed amateur band — one which 



1 



16 



73 MAGAZINE 



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1600 Decker » San Martin, CaMfofnia 35046 
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is finally getting ready to be senously 
used by the amateure. On the other 
hand the Commission (in fact, Mr. 
Walker) was moving to shut down 
repeaters - to make remote base sta- 
tions virtually impossible — stopping 
experimentation — discouraging inven- 
tion and development of emergency 
services — and making life miserable 
with a mountain of paperwork and 
license fees. 

LICENSING REPEATERS 

As more and more repeater groups 
get fed up with the seemingly total 
insanity issuing from the FCC, and as 
the deadline for having a license for 
the repeater nears — frustration, re* 
sentment and a to-hell-with-them atti- 
tude seems to be gaining ground* They 
are not unaware of the annoyed arro- 
gance reported by ARRL staffers to 
be the attitude of Mr. Walker. 

The groups are questioning the 
ability of the FCC to make the ridicu- 
lous rules stick. After all, they muse, 
if the FCC is totally impotent in the 
face of the mess on the CB band — 
there isn't much they can do to 
enforce senseless rules on hams, 

it is sad to see the closed- minded 
attitude of Walker's office turning the 
most behaved group of licensees the 
Commission has into a bunch of revo- 
lutionaries who are so furious they "*? 



considering breaking their long stand- 
ing pattern of being the least trouble 
to the FCC of all their licensees* 

THE PETITION 

Many have arrived - and I need 
many, many more. Please make up a 
sheet of paper with "I petition the 
FCC to reconsider docket 18803" on 
top and have as many amateurs sign it 
as possible - please include their calls, 
addresses and zip. Send them to 
me - - . Wayne Green, 73 Magazine, 
Peterborough NH 03458. 

Several readers have called to tell 
me that ARRL officials have been 
telling clubs and hamfests that the 
petitions are a waste of time and 
effort— that they will do no good If 
I was not sure that they could do 
some good I would not go to all that 
work. The fact is that we have no 
other way to go that holds any reason- 
able promise of success* 

Petitions to the FCC will not do 
any good, I suspect. Mr. Watker is too 
powerful there and may be able to get 
any and all petitions thrown out 
without even the slightest considera- 
tion as he did the last batch — includ- 
ing the hundreds of letters of protest. 
No, I can't see any good to come from 
going the "offtcial" route. 

Frankly I have never had any inten- 
tion of merely filing them with the 



FCC so Mr. Walker could throw them 
down the drain with the garbage. I 
intend to do what I can to see if there 
is any possibility of getting action 
some other way. I want the- biggest 
pile of petitions I can get to carry 
with me to Washington when I talk 
with as many senators as po^ible 
about the terrible situation amateur 
radio is in today. 

If I can talk with Senator John 
Pastore of Rhode Island, the chairman 
of the Senate Communications Sul> 
committee and explain what the prob- 
lem is — why it is important — arxJ 
show him a sheaf of Rhode Island 
signatures, then it ^ust might get 
things started. I have 48 signatures 
from Rhode Island so far — arnl I need 
more - lots more. 

If I can talk with Senator Howard 
Baker of Tenessee, the man who heads 
up the Amateur and CB Division of 
the FCC — and show him names of 
constituents, it could help. I have only 
five signatures from Tennessee so far 
and I need more — lots more. 

!f I can arrange to talk with Senator 
Kennedy of Massachusetts and explain 
the ramifications of the situation, 
together with a bunch of signatures, 
he might be able to put in a word that 
would help to get Mr. Walker trans- 
ferred. I have 37 Massachusetts signa- 
tures so far and I need many more . 



JULY 1973 



17 



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I'd certainly want to see what we 
can do with Senator Goldwater, but 
with only ONE Arizona signature I 
don't have a very loud voice yet Is 
there only one concerned amateur in 
all of Arizona? 

Please see what you can do to get 
signatures on petitions. When getting 
non FMers to sign, point out that the 
disastrous rules are hitting at! aspects 
of the hobby, but that we are choos- 
ing this one docket to make the fight 
because it is so clearly detrimental to 
amateur radio in so many ways. If we 
try to fight many different dockets alt 
at once we will lose our punch. 

To date I have a little over 1000 
signatures on the petition from 38 
states. Michigan is leading with 257 
and Ohio is second with 213 - and we 
nave 56 from Utah, so let's get crack- 
ing! 

Put It this way - what have you to 

lose? 



is what was done during the floods in 
Pennsylvania, 

A faster way of getting a repeater 
into service where needed would be to 
have one that can be set up in a plane 
and flown around over the area need- 
ing communications. This would be 
able to serve a much larger area than a 
regular repeater- would not go off 
the air if power fails (as it usually 
does) — and could be available any- 
where. 




AIRBORNE REPEATERS? 

While much of the country is 
presently served by repeaters, emer- 
gencies and disasters can strike any^ 
where - even where there may not be 
an open repeater. In the recent past 
amateurs have responded by going 
into the emergency area with a por- 
table repeater and setting it up — this 



A communications system built 
upon an airborne repeater would be of 
incalculable value. The wide area it 
would serve would enable hand units 
to be used to talk with other hand 
units tor mobiles or base stations) 
over a range of two or three hundred 
miles, if needed. 

Such a system is not likely to spring 
from nothing into full bloom. The 
fact is that though we know we can 
set such a thing up, there are a lot of 
experimental details that will have to 



be ironed out before it would be 
dependable. This means experiment- 
ing - trying it out - encouraging re- 
peater groups around the country to 
set up airborne repeaters and use 
them. We have to find out how best to 
separate the transmitter and receiver 
so the repeater is sensitive and effec- 
tive - we have to know what ranges 
we can depend upon from various 
altitudes — etc- 

Keith W7DXX, the managing editor 
of 73, has a small Piper Cherokee 
plane and the interest to set up such 
an experimental system. We even have 
a nice small Standard two meter 
repeater (now in use as WR1AAB) 
which could be pressed into service to 
check out the idea. We're not sure 
whether it woufd work better with a 
small diplexer or with a trailing anten- 
na for transmitting, getting the separa- 
tion that way. 

Before any experimenting can be 
done there is the problem of licensing 
the repeater — and this is such a major 
problem that it may be insurmoun- 
table, Keith called Walker to find out 
about getting the license and was 
advised that he would need a separate 
license for every call area over which 

he would fly. This would mean at least 
five licenses, minimum, for the 
W1-2-3'4-8 areas are all within a short 
flying distance of New Hampshire and 



18 



73 MAGAZINE 





99 channels of pure pleasure 



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1 289 9el/ qou 22 choAnels 
of pure pleosure iui(h ••• 




TEN crystals . . . (now that alone is going to save you about S40.00) . . . easy to hold 
noise canceling dynamic mike . , . a quick disconnect mobile mount . . . battery saving 
HI (10 watts)/Lo (1 watt) power option. # Your IC-22 will have a receiver that just 
won't Quit with a super hot mosfet front end, 5 helical resonators (you can forget about 
inter-mod), and a large speaker that will punch out plenty of audio for the car. 
9 You'll also be on frequency with trimmer caps on both trans, and rev. on all 22 
channels.. . . with a discriminator output jack in the back to let you get on and stay on 
freq. % PLUS the *22' is one good lookin' compact rig that you will be proud to put in 
your car-(the XYL won't mind it either) -with soft green back Itghiing on the front 
panel and a tight to silently let you know you are getting out . . . and a second fight to 
let you know there is an incoming signal (even though you may have the volume down}. 
# There is much, much more to tell you about the IC 22. but suffice it to say, the 10-22, 
with all of its unique features and performance record at S289.00, has got to be one of 
the best all-around values available on two meters today' 



SEE THE WHOLE ICOM FAMILY 



AND GRAB HOLD OF YOUR IC22 AT ANY OF THE AUiHuRlZED ICOM DEALERS LISTED BELOW: 



ALABAMA 

Wolfe Etectron^cs 

eojt 358 

Fol^y, Alabama 36535 

ARKANSAS 

Gavm Electronics 

516 Ridgeway 

Little Rock, Ark. 72205 

ARIZONA 

Ell Dee Enterprises 
1342 AE Indian School Rd, 
Phoenix, An; 85014 
i602J 942-9715 

CALiFORNtA 

ICOM FM Sates 
6234 A. fountain Blvd. 
Hollywood, Cahf 92028 
(213)462-1504 



Distributed by: 



Sequoia Stereo 
773- 8th Street 
Arcadia, Calif. 95521 

Henry Radio Company 
11240 W, Olympia 
Las Angetes, Calif. 90064 
{2^3\ 477-6701 

Sichel Equipment Co. 

245 £. Harris Ave. 

S. San Francisco, Calif. 94080 

(415)871 7600 

FLORIDA 

Goldsteins 

Box 3561 

Pensacola. Fla. 32506 

ILLINOIS 

Erickson Commun^catlons 
4653 N, Ravenswood 
Chicaqo. I IL 60640 
(3121 334-3200 



MARYLAND 

COM Electronics 
900 Grain Hwy. S.W, 
Glenn Burnie, Md. 21061 
(301) 761-3666 

NEW MEXICO 

Robert Foster 
Box 198 ■ Escabosa Stat Ri. 
Tijeras, NA1. 87059 
1505) 281-3975 



NEW YORK 

R, E. Nebel Laboratories 
31 Whitehall Blvd. 
Garden City, N,Y. 11530 

Barry Electronics 
512 Broadway 
New York. N.Y. 10012 
(21 2J 925-7000 



OH to 

H & C Electronics 
6271 Hammeil Ave 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45237 

OKLAHOMA 

Blacks Radio Company 
413 N.E. 38th Terrace 
Oklahoma City* Okla. 73106 

Roland Radio Company 
5923 E. 31 SI Street 
Tulsa, Okla 74114 
(918) 836-6833 

OREGON 

Portland Radio Supply 
Portland, Oregon 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Electronic Systems Inc. 
1518 Gregg St^eei 
Columbia. S.C. 29201 

TEXAS 

Bellaire Electronic Supply 
5204 BelUire Blvd. 
Bellaire, Te^as 77401 
(713) 667 4294 

Electronic Center Inc. 
2929 N, Ha&koli 
Dallas, TcKas 75204 
(214) 5262023 

K, A. Sales. Inc. 
1312 Slocum 
Dallas, Texas 75207 
(21 4^ 747 2662 

Trtmt>le Electronics 
28 10 Alexandria 
Tyler, Texas 75701 



UTAH 

Uiah FM Sales 

1365 E, 5360 So. 

Salt Lake City, Utali 84117 

WASHINGTON 

ABC Cammunications 
17541 . 15th fM.E. 
Stattle, Wash 98155 
(2061 364-6410 

ABC Communications 
2002 Madison Ave 
Everett, Wash. 98200 
(206) 353-6616 

N,H.E. Communications 
I5112S,E 44:h 
Bellevue, Wash. 98006 
i206l 747-8421 

Progress Electronics 
852 Commerce Street 
Longview, Wash. 98632 
(206) 636-5100 



ICOM 



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boom, this log periodic covers 
13-30 MHz continuous with 
max VSWR under 2:1 and is 
supplied with a 4 KW pep 
broad band batun. 

—Attention 6 Meter Enthusiasts- 
Take advantage of sporad ic E and tropo 

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Bandpass Antenna on a 30 foot 
boom priced for everyone for every- 

one's pocket at $79.95 




COVERS COMPLETE 420-450 MHz BAND 




MM 



THE COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT INNOVATORS" 

K6MYC 

KSHCP 

K6KBE 



1600 Decker * San Martiti, California 95046 
(408) 683r4240 or (408] 842*7349 



Write for full AntBnna Line Catatog 

See KLM ad this issue for our compatible 

VHF Power Amp Line 



AU prices FOB San Martin and are 
subject to change without notice. 



all get visited quite a bit. That's $45 in 
fees, plus the piles upon piles of 
paperwork. 

The FCC is making the develop- 
ment of innovative systems such as 
this extremely difficult to set up and 
license. When you consider ttie value 
of an emergency repeater that is air- 
bome, something is seriously wrong 
with the FCC when they interfere to 
that extent. 

One of the basic reasons for ama- 
teur radio's ©cistence is the develop- 
ment of equipment designs and tech- 
niques which will be of value and 
further the state of the an* The degree 
that Walker's regulations are making 
this difficult is such that the effec- 
tiveness of the amateur service is being 
seriously impaired* 



AMATEUR RADIO HERITAGE 

Present day amateurs may have 
forgotten some of the invaluable work 
of earlier amateurs. The fact is that 
amateurs have done a great deal of 
develpment of radio communica- 
tions — not only in the remote past, 
but in the recent past, 

We are all familiar with amateurs 
being thrown upstairs into the unwan- 
ted short waves a couple of genera- 
tions ago. Okay, so be it - and we got 
to work and made the frequencies 
valuable. As we increased their value 



we were gradually thrown out — 
finally to be left with little slivers here 
and there. 

But what have we done for radio 
recently? A lot — a whole tot. 

Let's go back not very many years 
to the beginnings of sideband. How 
many of you know how SSB got 
started? You've probably heard that it 
was in commercial use for many years 
before amateurs started using it. What 
you may have missed is that it was in 
use on the low frequencies, and that 
until an amateur (Villard) invented 
the phasing type rig it wasn't practical 
on the high frequencies. Once ama- 
teurs got going with sideband it swept 
amplitude modulation right out the 
window. Sideband was, in alt practical 
senses, an amateur radio invention. 

How about narrow band FM? 
Another ham first. Jack Babkes 
W2GDG did the groundwork on this 
in the late 40's and founded Sonar 
Radio to build the first NBFM gear. 
And what are we using on two meters 
today? NBFM. 

Have hams invented anything else? 
You bet — Sam Hams W1FZJ inven- 
ted the parametric amiifier on six 
meters — and that was in the late 50's, 
And how about most of the present 
day commercial RTTY circuits — 
designed by hams for ham RTTY. 
How about slow scan television? Hams 
again. 



Did you know that virtually all of 
the repeater control circuits being 
invented today are coming from 
hams? WeVe still at it. 

But the end of the line is approach- 
ing unless there is a b^ic change at 
the FCC. The new regulations are 
cnjshingly restrictive — they thwart 
and prevent experimentation and 
development of new circuits and 
ideas. They discourage innovators. 



THAT EXTRA CLASS LICENSE 

Judging from talks he has given, the 
Extra Class license is dear to Walker's 
heart and he is dedicated to its 
furtherance* 

Judging from the growth curves 
from the FCC, annateurs could care 
less about the Extra. 

The Extra Class license was first 
available in 1952 and about 4000 who 
had previously held the ticket were 
grandfathered into it. No privileges 
were given to licensees, so interest in 
it was about zilch. 

The punishment licensing regula- 
tions went into effect in 1967 and this 
forced a few amateurs to take the 
Extra Class exam in order to continue 
to use the frequencies they had been 
using previously on 75m and 15m. 
There was a little spurt as a result of 
this change in band allocations. This 
soon settled down to a miniscule 



20 



73 MAGAZINE 



growth of about 50 licenses per [ 
month - and that comes to an in- 
crease of 0,019% (and if that isn't 
miniscule, what fs?)* That comes out 
to a one percent increase in about five 
years! 

That also equals about the biggest 
bomb ever laid by the FCC — unless 
you count the recent repeater regula- 
tEons, which still is unknown as to end 
results in number of hams forced out 
of the service and number of people 
killed by the lack of repeaters on the 
air to save their lives. The results of 
the punishment licensing bomb are 
now known and proven — and even 
the worst predictions have been ex- 
ceeded by the test of time- In the face 
of this catastrophe will Walker con- 
tinue to punish us or will reason at 
long last prevail and the rules be 
changed to benefit the amateur sen^ice 
Instead of louse it up? 

If you've invested in one of the new 
calculators you can have fun with 
those figures. You can figure out the 
yearly and total increases or decreases 
for each class of license ~ and overall. 

When you look closefy at the Extra 
Class licenses you find that there has 
been an increase - but it is less than 
3% of the ham population over a 
seven year period! You will also note, 
perhaps, that the increase was briskest 
about five veare ago and that it has 
tapered off substantially to where it is 
going up about 1% of the ham popula- 
tion in five years at present — unless it 
drops off even more. 

Looking at the other classes of 
license we find that in terms of the 



Q^X CCP]\[TEST 




L P ED 

PECFD 

WB5BBY 

Richard MadsaapiOi 

^9 NOTTINGHAM ROAD 
AMARILLO.TEXAS 79106 



N.O- 
5 i 7 O t 




flHAiUHEt 
DA. 



FROM 



WB5BBY wins a one year subscrip- 
tion to 73 for submitting the most un- 
usual entry this month, WB0IQK receives 
an honorable mention for submitting the 
most , , , well, how could we resist? 

Send your QSL to: QSL Contest 73 
Magazine^ Peterborough NH 03458. 



ham population they have changed as 
follows: Novices are up 3,5% — Techs 
are down about 3% — Conditionals are 
down 4% — Generals are down 
7.3% — Advanced are up 7,8% and 
Extra are up 2.9%. The total ham 
population has gone down by 112 in 
seven years* 

The result of the policy of virtually 
eliminating all Conditional licenses 
which v«nt into effect several yeafs 
ago can be seen to be choking them 
off gradually. 

The number of Advanced and Extra 
increases are about equal to the losses 



EXTRA CLASS 



10K 



5K 















1 














50/ifn 


onth 














^^ 


'^ ' 








V 


— '^ 














y^ 














/ 
















/ 














/ 


f 














/ 












>-^ 





















New Re 


gs. 




, 






1 

















































in General and Conditional, The 7,8% 
Advanced increase indicates that this 
class of license has been accepted, 
though not to any degree as expected 
by the Commission. That evens out to 
about 1% per year — so all we have to 
do is wait one hundred years, right? 



1965 



66 



67 



68 



69 



70 



71 



72 



73 



OPEN LETTER TO DANNALS 

Harry, I understand that you have 
been speaking at ham conventions and 
telling listeners that I was deceitful in 
getting my repeater license WRIAAB- 
I know that you would not dare to 
face me publicly with such a charge. 

The license was in no way deceit* 
fully obtained. After talking at great 
length with Mr. Wafker I determined 
what I considered the simplest system 
for getting a repeater license. I wrote 
about this in the Repeater Bulletin, in 
73 and I expounded on it at two FM 
symposiums put on by 73 Magazine 
and also at several hamfests and con- 
ventions, I did exactly what I recom- 
mended others do: apply for a very 
simple license so as to get a call and 
then hassle over remote control and 
special antennas later on. 

The fact is that WR1AAB was 
licensed to my home in Peterborough 
with no remote control and witii a 
half wave dipole. The repeater is on 
the air from my home under my 
direct contro! and using a half wave 
dipole for the transmitter, as licensed* 

it is also a fact that the bulk of the 
repeater licenses issued by the FCC 
went to g^oups that followed the 
system 1 have propounded. I believe 
that WR1 AAA, WR2AAA, WR3AAA, 
WR4AAA, and WR8AAA all used this 
sytem to get their calfs. 

Qont*d. on page 93 



JULY 1973 



21 






Another American Favorite! 



A discriminating ham and Yaesu prod- 
ucts go togetiner like that old Amer- 
ican favorite, ham and eggs. That's 
why there's an ever-increasing de- 
mand for the complete line of amateur 
radio products now available from 
Yaesu Musen USA Inc. 

Yaesu products are a natural for 
American hams because of their strict 
standard of high quality. And because 
Yaesu now has its own factory in the 
U.S. to provide direct service and to 
back up its dealers throughout the 
country. 

Another American favorite. Ham and 
Yaesu. 




: o o O e c 





\ 





YAESU MUSEN USA INC. 

7625 East Rosecrans Ave.. Unit 
Paramount, California 90723 
Phons: (213) 633-4007 



= 29, 



YAESU DEALERS: 

HENRY RADIO STORES 

Los Angeles, Anaheim, Calif.; Butler. Mo. 

HAM RADIO OUTLET 
Burltngame, Calif. 

RACOM ELECTRONICS 
Renton, Wash. 

WILSON ELECTRONICS 
Pittman, Nev. 



ED JUGE ELECTRONICS 
Fort Worth, Dallas, Texas. 

AMATEUR ELECTRONICS SUPPLY 

Milwaukee, Wis.; Cleveland, Ohio. 

FRECK RADIO & SUPPLY 
Ashevllle, No. Carolina. 

HARRISON RADIO 

Farmingdale. New York, Valley Stream, N.Y, 



22 



73 MAGAZINE 



TUNABLE 




Mil Hoisington Kl CLL 
Farover Farm 
^terborough NH 03458 




ON 




TWO METER FM 



Tlie two variable oscillators described can he plugged into the crystal 
socket of any receiver or transceiver using 45 MHz receive crystals. The 
result is a highly stable tunable receiver covering the entire two meter band. 



This article describes a working, tunable, 
IC local oscillator covering 146 to 148 
MHz, that can be plugged into a crystal 
socket of almost any of the 2 meter FM 
receivers sold in the USA, You can build a 
few for yourself and friends^ but please note 
that a patent has been applied for on this 
unit and its uses. 

Design Theory and Philosophy 

A lot of tunable oscillator design , includ- 
ing my own up to now, has suffered from 
precedent, habit, and a general lack of 
iimovation. Long-time and sound considera- 
tion brings to light certain fundamental 
facts, as follows: 
Lit is hard enough to make a simple L-C 

circuit stand still by itself, even without 

hanpng a variable capacitor around it, 

such as a transistor, 

2. To make a very good osciUator^ you do 
not have to do that, 

3. Use a basic L-C made of the best possible 
components, temperature wise, along with 
the best possible mechanical construction* 

4. Use a high-gain stable, compound ampli- 
fier, one that is good to at least 50 MHz, 
because we are going to use it around 22 
to 24 MHz, as a driver for the L-C circuit* 

5. This amplifier should have a bandwidth 



which at least covers the frequency range 
we will use, in a reasonably flat fashion. 
This will only be some 200 kHz or less at 
22.7 MHz, so it is not difficult. 

6. Use the maximum gain of the amplifier, 
and minimum feedback to the L-C so that 
the L-C will control, by some 98 to 99%, 
the frequency of the osciUator- 

7. Run the oscillator at a frequency where it 
wni not jump around. Inasmuch as good, 
stable oscillators for receivers on 30 MHz 
have been made for at least 35 years that I 
know about, anything there or lower wiU 
do nicely. 

8. Start off with at least a reasonably good 
and rigid mechanical foundation, 

r bolted a thick piece of copper-clad on 
top of aluminum chassis. A Miller dial, 
slide-rule type, was bolted on top of that 
with heavy angles, and that did it. Ft tunes 
nicely up and down 2 meter FM sidebands, 
and beat a 147 MHz signal with precision. 
The tie points I used are my regular ones, 
.021 common pins, hammered into ,020 
holes in fiberglass strips. 1 actually used 
glass-epoxy with the copper pulled off Oust 
because I didn't happen to have any around 
without the copper). 

I put in a simple 6V zener to keep the 
voltage both down and constant. This oscil- 



Jm.Y 1973 



23 



DIAL 

STflINO 



^^ 






mm I Mil rmTB 



CT 



S 



c 



J * ' 



s 






f f ' 



^ ^ *?% 




1 PLATE, SpF 



45 UHz 

^ — a 




'MOUNT SCCUAELY 



Fig. 1, ftctoriaJ iayout of the single IC plug-in local oscilla tar See Figs, 2 and 5 for circuit details. This 
layout will lend itself to a compact construction limited only by the size of a good vernier dial 



lator is extremely unresponsive to voltage 
changes, but most IC ampUfiers use 6V 
maximum and you do have to run from 
12V, for car and battery operation, which 
may go from 11 to ISV^ so at least one 
zener is indicated- 
Couple the IC to the L-C in a manner so 
that the least frequency change possible will 
be produced. Once you have done this, and 
the other things mentiond above, you will 
have a vfo that is a pleasure to use. Mine is 
out in the open like all my breadboard jobs, 
but you can put your hand anywhere on it» 
except within an inch of the primary L-C, 
and not notice any change in frequency 
when listening to 2 meter FM stations. What 
more can you ask? 

Layout 

Figure 1 shows the layout used. You can 
put it in a small box or case if you wish, for 
use on top of the receiver, but better get one 
working first^ in order to have all the 
components tested and ready to go. Once 
you get them into that small case it is not so 
easy to modify or exchange those small 
units. Just be sure and observe the guide- 
lines, and it will work for you, too. But 
don't leave any out! 

Circuit 

Please refer to Fig. 2 for the circuit. To 
be noted first are a number of capacitors 



across the L-C circuits starting with LI. CI is 
operated by the diaL You have the choice of 
tuning over 2 MHz, 146 to 148 MHz, or 
using a switch and putting in two capacitors 
at the C3 position, one to set the receiver for 
146 to 147 MHz and the other for the 147 
to 148 MHz range. Of course the mixer 
injection is actually on 146 to 148 MHz 
minus the 10-7 i-f frequency. Suit yourself 
on the question of one or two MHz ranges. 

Using the whole dial for each MHz makes 
the tuning easier but requires a few more 
parts. Remember that the oscillator is actual- 
ly on 22.716 for the receiver to be receiving 
on 147 MHz. 




C3 a Ce AftCO 4g3 
7-iOO pF 

HEP 590 AS SHOWN rS BOTTOM VIEW 



+ »2 



Fig. 2. Ultra stable oscillator shcernatic. Ll^ lOT 
No, 24, L3 cm long, 0.5 cm I.D.; L2, 2T over or 
dose to cold end of Ll\ coupling should be 
adjusted for minimum reaction while maintaining 

good oscillator output; L3, 13T No. 24, LS cm 
long, 0*7 cm LD., lap at 3T from ground end. 



24 



73 MAGAZINE 



C2 makes it easier to set C3, which has 
too much capacity to set easily. It can be 
done, but setting the dial with C2 is better. 
C4 is an additional fixed capacitor to bring 
the C up to the desired point of bandspread 
so that CI will cover one MHz, with about 
5% to spare on each end. I trust you are 
familiar with this method. The more C you 
put across LI, the wider on the dial is spread 
the one MHz you are looking for. 

The tuned circuit of this oscillator is not 
connected to the collector or the base of a 
transistor. It is connected, via a low im- 
pedance link, to the input of an IC con> 
pound ampUfier. The output of this high 
gain IC goes to a non-critical tuned circuit, 
L2, which is quite separate from the fre* 
quency determining LL A one pF capacitor 
couples energy from L2 back to LL In this 
manner the I C output circuit is very lightly 
coupled to LL This is made possible by the 
high gain of the 590 IC and its very low 
reverse transconductance* This parameter, 
generally written as "Yr/' is the one that in 
any usual bipolar transistor is high enough to 
cause self-osciUation unless neutralized. The 
different result, in a compound amphfier 
device such as the IC used in Fig. L is a very 
stable oscillator which handles in a superb 
fashion as a tunable L.O. for 2 meter FM 
receivers. 

Details 

LI is not critical. However, it should be 
noted that there is quite a large C and alow 
L. In fact the inductance of LI is so low 
that, if used with a low C it will tune way 
over 100 MHz* So we find about 200 pF 
across LI, which puts it into the 22 to 23 
MHz region. It is then multiplied in a 
doubler to 45 mHz which is cabled into the 
receiver crystal socket- This is then used for 
the tunable L,0- of the receiver, which was 
previously crystal controlled, and becomes 
multiplied to 136 MHz in the receiver. With 
any suitable slow-motion dial, the tuning is 
now about as easy and non-critcal as on any 
band in the hf region of 2 to 30 MHz. I used 
a 2 5 -year-old Bud 3 plate variable in parallel 
with all the other capacitoi^ across LI, 
totalling around 200 pF, This produced a 
tuning range of a little over a MHz when 
multiplied by six, landing in the 135 to 



1363 range for use as a 2 meter L.O- with a 
1 0.7 i-f frequency. 

C4 should be a silvered mica or any other 
non-shifting-with-temperature capacitor you 
may favor, C3 is a trimmer for use in setting 
the dial for 146 to 147 MHz, the second 
from 147 to 148 MHz, if you use the switch 
method to cover the 2 MHz range. CI is the 
8 pF you tune with, connected to your 
favorite dial. One of the nice things about 
this L,0- is that^ taking all the items to- 
gether, there isn't any one of them alone 
really critical, I just mounted the 8 pF on a 
rigid sub-panel of copper clad in back of the 
front panel (see Fig. 1 again), and that was 
it. Dividing the 1 MHz L.O. tuning range by 
6 comes out around 166,5 kHz, which is all 
the tuning range required of the 8 pF 
variable at 22.7 MHz. 

Internal schematic of the Motorola HEP 
590, shown in Fig, 3, discloses Ql as the 
common emitter ampUfier driving Q2, a 
grounded base stage in the cascode configu- 
ration. This is called a compound ampUfier- I 
have used the 590 for several years now, as 
73 Magazine readers know, and it has always 
performed well. It has high gain and requires 
no neutralizing, due to the low reverse 
transconductance of the unit. That means 
the internal feedback is very low, even 
though the gain is high- Q3 is used to keep 
the current constant if age is used. Age 
would be appMed in positive-going form to 
pin 5,. if required, which is not the case here. 



+6V 




FEEDBACK RftTH FOR OSCILLATOR 



Fig, 3, Internal connections of the HEP59Q and the 
feedback path used for osciUation. 



JULY 1973 



25 



Full gain is used by grounding pin 5, If you 
play around with it all, note that that pin 1 
return must go to pin 4, 

Operation 

As usual, an oscillator should be running 
when you start to talk about it, so here we 
go. Referring to Fig. 2 and also to Fig, 3 for 
the internal workings of the 590, we see the 
22.7 MHz signal entering the 590 on pin 1, 
the base of Ql. Here it is amplified, goes to 
Q2 for more amplification, emerging on pin 
6, the collector, and from there on out to L3 
and L6, which are also tuned to 22,7 MHz, 
Some 25 to 30 dB of amplification is 
available, and the feedback path from L3 
through C5 to LI thus takes only a small 
amount of the possible output power, which 
is not the case with many known oscillators, 
some of which use nearly all their entire 
dissipation limit just to maintain oscillation. 
This oscillator section, including the zener, 
should take about 5 to 6 mA< The value of 
C5 is quite important, and the needed value 
can be adjusted by varying the tap on L3, If 
C5 is connected to the high end of L3 less 
pF will be needed than in the indicated tap 
position, at 3 turns from ground. The overall 
phase is important of course, but shows 
interesting evidence of what may be called 
"phase-slip" as the ac around the total path 
C5'L1-L2-QI-Q2'L3 and back to C5 finds 
plenty of places for incidental phase shift, 
both plus or minus. This is evidenced by the 
reveisability of the connections to L2 with- 
out stopping oscillation. Connected in the 
best way^ the operation is cleaner. This is 
not the case in most digital work where 
inverting and non4nverting inputs are seen 
to be very strict in their operation because 
of the dc type all-or-nothing opera tioti. 

Tune-up and Test 

I used my regular tuned diode detector 
for this. As you go down in frequency from 
147 to 22.7 MHz, these become easier to 
construct, as in Fig, 4- These things are of 
great value for crystal tunenip as well as for 
vfo*s like this one. They can be easily 
calibrated with a $40 signal generator, one 
piece of test equipment you really should 
start with. There is quite a bit of adjustment 
to do between C4, C3 and C2, in order to 



iwyT 





i 

^ mm 



Fig. 4, Tuned diode detector (21-75 MHz) used 
for checking oscillator and doubler output. Lit 2T 
movable near L2; L2, 7T No. 3003 miniduc tor (16 
TPIf 1.3 cm diameter), diode tap at 2T from top. 

get the 1 MHz or 2 MHz spread out on the 
dial at 147 MHz that you are looking for. 
Also you may have to change LI quite a bit. 
It's well worth it, though ^ because once you 
get it you can leave it, with slight touch-ups 
on C2. 

Feedback 

After a few adjustments on C5 you will 
soon get the hang of it. Too much feedback 
will cause too great a rise in milliamps in the 
590, Too little feedback will result in weak 
oscillation- Just be sure and peak C6-L3 to 
the same frequency as LL C7 will have an 
effect, though small, on L3, so it should be 
connected into the doubler which should be 
operating also. You can connect another 
tuned diode to the doubler output if you 
wish. I always do that^ because as you jump 
around in frequency during the first tune- 
ups, you may easily hit an undesiredt har- 
monic and unknowingly stay there. The 
tuned diode detectors give you relative 
power and frequency at all times. Make sure 
of a good rep eatable dial and mechanical 
stability before you start assembling and 
wiring. 

Calibration 

If you are in a region where there are 
plenty of repeaters, like here in Peter- 
borough with Massachusetts J New Hamp- 
shire and Vermont mountains, and Connec- 
ticut hnis, you can pick up ten or fifteen at 
almost any moment mornings and evenings, 
and will have no trouble calibrating the dial* 

If not, start out with the indispensable 
signal generator, which should put you quite 
near 147 MHZj give or take half an MHz or 
so. You may have to find a friend who can 
help a little, with something on Two, and 



26 



73 MAGAZINE 



r 



then someone is iiure to have on hand some 
old two meter crystals which can be put to 
good use to calibrate the dial, if by chance 
you live several hundred miles from the 
nearest repeater. (Just where would that be 
today?) 

You will also want to spread 2 MHz, say 
146 to 147, over the dial. This takes a little 
more doing, but with some frequency points 
found, a simple graph can be set up which 
will help, such as 146 = 15 on the dial, 147 = 
91 on the dial, etc. At least one crystal 
probably came with your receiver, which 
will help, or you can order one on the 
frequency of your nearest repeater^ and this 
crystal can be used later also, 

Doubler 

Most receivers use a crystal in the 45 MHz 
range, so you're most hkely after a 45 MHz 
output here. There are a few receivers with 
15 MHz rocks, Inoue and Standard for 
example, but most use 45 MHz. So a simple 
doubler as in Fig, 5 does the trick. An HEP 
55 is used, but almost any 200 MHz NPN 
will do, A lead from C7 to the base of the 55 
from C7 in Fig. 2 brings the 45 MHz in to 
the doubler. The collector goes to CI and LI 
in Fig. 5, with a tap on LI and series C2 for 
the matching and loading of LI. Do not load 
LI too heavily- if you use the tuned diode 
detector method you will be able to adjust 
tliis to the right point, which is a compro- 
mise between maximum output and maxi- 
mum Q- You should be sure and have good 
tuning in order to boost the 45 MHz and 
drop the rest. Loading too much will not 
produce this happy condition. That's about 
it for the doubler. Be sure and use a diode 
detector to check on relative power while 
tuning up, and check the af to be sure noise 
is i^ept out. This doubler circuit is about as 
simple an rf circuit as can be found, so good 
luck. 

Crystal Socket Adaptor 

I expected complications when 
connecting the oscillator-doubler unit to the 
receiver crystal socket, such as self 
oscillation in the crystal transistor, with the 
crystal out, etc. Some did show up, but they 
were soon eliminated. After a few trials with 
tuned circuits and certain other methods, 



HEP 55, 



ARCC 423 




45 MHt 

OUT 

-^^^ 

ARCO 424 
16-150 pF 



JD) 



/77 



■0 + 6V 



Fig. 5. Doubierfor 45 MHz output, L4, IT No. 24, 
2,3 cm long, 2 cm LD, 



with self -oscillation showing up at times, I 
found the simplest way to do it. Figure 6 
shows that (at least in this case) the simplest 
is the best. The two series capacitors CI and 
C2 take care of any dc voltage wandering 
around between the units and eliminates 
self-oscillation in the receiver crystal circuit 
(from which the crystal has been removed, 
of course). Remember that a crystal is a 
*' perfect" capacitor as far as dc goes, so 
there is no dc component to worry about- 
The crystal is often used as a dc blocking 
cap. My usual oscillators are almost always 
that way. Even in the good old days with 
tubes and a hundred volts or so, crystals 
were always good at blocking dc. After all^ 
it*s quartz, isnU it? 

If you run the doubler output circuit 
Cl-Ll in Fig. 5 with the cable output'tap 
fairly high up on LI you will get quite 
enough voltage at 45 MHz, The cable should 
then be as short as possible and run into the 
receiver crystal socket. 1 found quite a lot of 
leeway, with nothing critical encountered 
except if you get a little off frequency with 
anything open, such as receiver with top 
open or unshielded wires, you will liit 
commercial FM stations on 993 MHz. This 
is the 22,7 MHz energy times four doing its 
job. With everything buckled up, only the 



l-IZ pF 



cAa£ 

FROM OSC. 




so&cettS 

IVER 



Fig. 6. Adaptor for connecting the 45 MHz output 
of the osciliator to a 2m receiver. 



JULY 1973 



27 



4-£5 pF TO 




TEST 
OUTPUT 



470 

WV 0+12 



777 



6V ZEMER 



Fig. 7. Mtra-ii/tra stable oscillator schematic. This circuit offers superior performance over that of Fig. 
2 due to the greater isolation between LI and L5, LI and L3: 15T No- 24, L2 cm long, 0.7 cm LD.; 
L2 and L4: IT at cold end (check operation with leads reversed) i L5'. same as LI with tap at center. 
Isolate or shield LI from L5. C4 is a piece of wire positioned near LI- 



two meter stations are received. Figure 6 
also shows the way the two caps are 
mounted, and the pins which take the place 
of the crystal pins. I didn*t have a *'dead" 
crystal, so I used the pins from an old 
seven-pin plug from the old tube days. It 
pays to have a large junk box. Mine has it's 
own bedroom! The pins of the crystal used 
in the receivers 1 tried were all .040 OD. 1 
imagine sets of pins spaced, in a header, are 
readily available but 1 have not checked on 
it. 

Ultra-Ultra Stable Oscillator 

This vfo is quite similar to the one 
described previously in this article, except 
for the use of two IC*s instead of one. The 
purpose of course is to provide more gain 
and less feedback in order to have greater 
isolation of the frequency setting circuit 
LI -CI in Fig. 7. Tliis results in even greater 
stability than furnished by the single LC 
oscillator- Figure 7 will be seen to have only 
slight changes from Fig, 2. The coupling 
Unks are only one turn compared to the two 
turns in Fig. 2, and C4 is a gimmick about 
l/lOth of a pF. Also, LI must be well 
isolated and /or shielded from L5, due to the 
large gain involved in the use of the cascaded 
590 stages. 

The doubter to be used can be the same 
as in Fig. 5, and the same procedure for 
tuning up each doubter can be used. The 
same tune-up method as used for the single 
IC oscillator can be used for the two IC job. 
A little more attention must be paid because 
of the three tuned circuits to assure enough 



bandwidth as CI is tuned. This whole 
circuit, having much more gain, can be 
broadened out in bandwidth a great deal by 
putting low ohmage resistors across L3 and 
L5. You can see a 5K already on L5, You 
can go as low as 3000 or even less. At that 
value the tuning of L3 and L5 will be seen to 
be quite broad* An interesting method for 
tuning up LI, L3 and L5 is simply to hook a 
signal generator into LI by a one or two 
turn link around it and tune everything to 
22-7 MHz. Use the test output jack shown in 
Fig. 7 coupled to a tuned diode. Of course, 
remove the feedback line from L5 to LI 
when you do this! This circuit is a good one 
for a 30 MHz i-f for 1296 and microwaves. 

Conclusion 

Two integrated circuit oscillators have 
been described which are suitable for use as 
tunable local oscillators for I M receivers 
which are presently crystal-controlled. The 
output, usually in the 45 MHz range, is 
plugged into any crystal socket of the 
receiver and allows tuning over the range 
146 to 148 MHz. A two position switch, 
optional, may be used to spread 146 to 147, 
and then 147 to 148 MHz, over 95% of the 
dial, for greater ease of tuning and 
repeatability. The first oscillator uses one IC 
for simplicity, while the second uses two for 
greater stability. Although all construction 
here has been of the breadboard variety, the 
layout of the oscillators as described could 
lend themselves weU to PC board construe- 

tioa. 

.. .KICLL 



28 



73 MAGAZIfslE 



Dale Wmer WB9FQF, 
5736 Connell 

Shawnee Mission KS 66203 




BASIC 
AMATEUR 
TV 
SYSTEM 



A TV has become something of a step- 
M child of amateur radio in the last 
couple of years, as least as compared to its 
younger siblings SSTV, There are several 
good reasons why tliis has happened- First of 
all, it is considerably more difficult to get 
any kind of a signal at all on the air in the 
fast scan mode than it is with slow scan. 
Second, and more important^ there never has 
been much literature available that dealt 
with the subject. Even the most recent 
ARRL handbook makes only casual refer- 
ence to the subject, and refers the reader to 
one article J published more than ten years 
ago, that describes a very primitive system 
using equipment that is not readily available, 
73 has published some good articles on the 
subject, notably those by Tom O'Hara 
W60RG, but none of these has dealt 
thoroughly with the problem of getting a 
reUabie transmitter on the air at a decent 
power leveL It is my intent to remedy at 
least a part of that problem in this article- 




In dealing with the problem of putting an 
ATV signal on the air, there are five things 
that must be given serious consideration: 



1 . Camera 

2. Transmitter 

3. Modulator 

4- Antenna 

5- Sound transmission 



The camera doesn't present much of a 
problem. There are a great many of them on 
the market. If you don't like the prices you 
can purchase them in kit form or as surplus. 

The availability of surplus FM equipment 
has helped greatly with the transmitter 
problem, but one most choose wisely in this 
area. Til return to this subject shortly, 

W60RG has designed a couple of excel- 
lent video modulators capable of applying 
excellent modulation to practically any 
transmitter. See the bibliography, or write to 



JULY 1973 



29 



Tom. He has wired and tested units for sale 
at reasonable prices (SI 5 to S20), I'll return 
to this subject too. 

Antennas can be a very sticky problem in 
ATV, because of the great bandwidth need- 
ed for a standard TV signal. Most hams tend 
to shy away from the yagi because of its 
narrow band reputation. ColUnears are un- 
wieldy and very difficult to get working 
properly. Oh, they 11 do some radiating, but 
getting the currents in all the sections equal 
so that the pattern is predictable and the 
gain is what is should be can be a knot of 
Gordian complexity. The log periodic has its 
points, but it is difficult from a mechanical 
standpoint. The heUx, also difficult mecham- 
cally, presents loss problems when working 
stations with uniplaner (1 tliink I made that 
word up) polarization. Comer reflectors are 
huge and the gain is quite low Ln view of the 
size of the antenna. 

So what do we do for an antenna? Let's 
take another look at the yagi< Our initial 
rejection of it was due to bandwidth con- 
siderations. In reality much of the yagi's 
"narrow handedness" is due to the matching 
arrangement, rather than some inherent 
quality of the anteima. if we're willing to 
settle for an swr of something a bit greater 
than unity, but not so high that it would 
cause serious losses^ the yagi will do an 
admirable job in ATV. 

1 have had excellent results using yagis 
made up just a shade shorter than the 
handbook dimensions (they*re usually cut 
for 432, while in the Kansas City area we're 
operating at about 440 MHz) and using a 
folded dipole for the driven element. The 
impedance of almost every multielement 
yagi is in the neighborhood of 20n. The 
standard four to one folded dipole steps this 
up to about 80 fi. Coupling this to a 5012 
line through a bazooka easily made from 
aluminum foil and plastic tape results in a 
1,6.1 swr. The swr on a 750 line would be 
less than L1:L Another scheme is to stack 
two such antennas one wavelength or mul- 
tiple thereof apart and run open line of not 
more than K25 cm spacing between therrL 
Now the impedance at the center of this line 
W4ll be about 400, for an swr of 1.25:1 on a 
SOfl line. This approach has been verified 
experimentally, and it works very well. 



There are three distinct systems of adding 
sound to video in use among amateurs 
today, not counting just sending the audio 
on another band. Closest to the real thing, 
and most expensive as well, is to use a 
separate FM transmitter and antenna, 4.5 
MHz higher than the video carrier. Some 
ATV enthusiasts FM the video carrier with 
audio, detecting the sound on a surplus FM 
receiver and feeding its first i-f to the TV set. 

This is a clever arrangement, but the FM 
receivers have terrible noise figures and 
limited bandwidth, making a poor TV con- 
verter, and the TV set will usually detect the 
audio as sound bars in the picture, if only to 
a small extent. The third approach is to use a 
subcarrier generator. Don^t let the term 
intimidate you. It's just a 4.5 MHz oscillator 
with a simple FM modulator. Its output is 
fed to the video modulator along with the 
camera output. If the video modulator has 
the proper bandwidth capabilities, any ham 
who can receive your video will also copy 
your audio on his TV set. The bibliography 
gives an excellent circuit if you Uke to build 
from scratch, ATV Research has a kit 
available for less than $20, and W60RG sells 
a wired unit for a few dollars more. 

Now let's get back to the subject of 
transmitters and video modulators. Your 
best bet is one of the surplus FM rigs. They 
will all put out about 15 or 20W, and some 
can be made to deliver quite a bit more. You 
are most Ukely to encounter GE, RCA or 
Motorola rigs. The GE and RCA units are by 
far the easiest to work with- They use dual 
pentodes (5894*s or 6907's) in the final I 
don't recommend them. If that sounds a bit 
strange, let me explain. First, these rigs use 
tuned lines for the input and output. This 
system is horribly inefficent as compared to 
either the coaxial or strip line methods- 
Second, the screen grid must be bypassed for 
videOj using an electrolytic capacitor in 
addition to the rf bypassing. Tuning for 
proper modulation is very critical and diffi- 
cult to maintain* Worst, these tubes heat like 
crazy. I had a 5894 that melted the solder 
on the tuned lines after about five minutes 
of continuous operation. 

The Motorola T-44 transmitter strip, al- 
though somewhat more difficult to rework 



30 



73 MAGAZINE 



mechanically, makes a much better TV rig. 
It u^s a 2C39 in grounded grid in the final. 
These tubes, with proper cooling, can dis- 
sipate lOOWl With lOOOV on the pJate, it's 
not hard to get SOW of video modulated rf 
out of one of these rigs. The real disadvai> 
tage of the T-44 is that grounded grid 
circuit. Since the easiest method of video 
modulation is grid modulation, this poses a 
problem- Actually, the 2C39 grid is not 
grounded for dc. It is coimected to a copper 
plate that is separated from the chassis by a 
sheet of mica. My grid dipper shows the 
value of this capacitor to be about 1 500 pF. 
This value is large enough to bypass much of 
the video. Grid modulating the T-44 as it 
stands, I found that the frequency response 
began to roll off at about 1 MHz, and that it 
had cut off completely by 2.5 MHz, The 
video definition was poor^ and the audio 
subcarrier wasn't there at all. 

Happily there is a way out. Take the 
output cavity apart (easy), make a couple of 
narrow shims from an epoxy PC board to 
space the copper grid plate further from the 
chassis, and put it all back together (hard). 1 
found that tacking aU of the copper and 
mica and stuff together with a few dabs of 
rubber cement made it possible for one 
human being with two hands to put it 
together again. This operation decreased the 
bypass capacitance to about 50 pF, Any- 
thing between 30 and 100 pF should do. 

The above modification makes the final 
somewhat prone to self oscillation when the 
video lead is connected to the grid, so some 
rf filtering is necessary. Figure 1 shows the 
circuit « 



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EXISTING CIRCUITRY 



Fig. 1. Circuit modification of the T-44 transmit- 
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JULY 1973 



31 



1 am using a slightly modified version of 
one of W60RG*s video modulators. The 
circuit given in the bibliography is a good 
one, but it is imperative that the lead from 
modulator to final grid be very, very short. 
This is difficult to accompUdi with the T'44, 
so I used the two transistor version shown in 
Fig. 2, The second transistor is an emitter 
follower that lowers the output impedance 
so that a longer Une can be used without 
degrading the video. It's still a good idea to 
keep that lead as short as you can. 

The capacitor that bypasses the emitter 
of the first transistor in the modulator plays 
a large role in determining the frequency 
response. W60RG suggests a value of 470 
pF. I am using about 1500 pF, It is best to 
play with this value once the system is 
operational. Too small a value will limit the 
definition, while too much capacitance will 
lead to video distortion. 

It is possible to put a signal on the air and 
carefully tune the final and adjust the 
frequency response of the modulator while 
anothCT ham monitors your signal, but it's 
not easy. The strong local rf will overload 
your receiver so you won't be able to tell 
what's really going on as you make each 
adjustment. Your best bet is to use a 
transmission line detector (Fig. 3) and watch 
the signal on a monitor or scope. While not 
an absolute necessity, a wideband scope will 
save you a lot of trouble. I'm using an RCA 
TM-6C Master Monitor, a combination video 
monitor and waveform analyzer. I bought it 
for SSO from a local TV station, where it 
had been replaced by a solid state unit. 
Denson has surplus units, althou^ their 
price is higher. 

To put the system in operation^ first get 
the audio subcarrier oscOlator on frequency. 
Either feed the signal into a standard TV set 




» 100V, REGULATED 



ro GRID OF 
FlfVAL 



IM4002 



Fig. 2, Video modulator. Both transistors ^e RCA 
2N3439 or 2N3440 with heat sinks. 



rN34. 
ETC. 



r 



SHORT PiECE OF COAK 



. WITH PICKUP LOOP IIVSIM 

SHIELD {JUST LIKE AN 
SWf? BRIDGE 1 



MEPflOZ 
I0|»F OR SiMjLAR 
50„H 15 V 

91 



ilOpF ;:4TK jf 



» +6 TO 15 VOLTS 




OUTPUT TO MON 
ITOR OR SCOPE 



Fig, 3, TYansmission line video detector. 

just after the video detector, or use a general 
coverage receiver to set it at 4,5 MHz, Then 
set the level. With the TV set you should be 
able to hear the audio and adjust the level so 
the audio does not upset the picture. On a 
scope, the trace should thicken just a bit 
during the blanking pulses. 

Now, connect the camera and audio unit 
to the modulator and fire up the transmitter* 
Tune for maximum output while staying 
within the tube ratings. Watch the scope or 
monitor as you adjust the modulator gain 
controi When you reach 100% modulation 
the top of the waveform on the scope will 
flatten out, and the whites in the picture will 
become washed out. Back off the gain 
control slightly. This is the time to play with 
the capacitor that sets the frequency re- 
sponse of the modulator. At the same time 
carefully tune the final around both sides of 
maximum output. The object is of course to 
get pleasing video and audio on the monitor, 
or on the scope, a pattern almost identical to 
that at the input to the modulator. 

I have experimented vydth several ATV 
transmitting arrangements, and the system 
IVe described, using the Motorola T-44 
transmitter strip, out-performs the others by 
a considerable margin. I suggest that you 
read as much of the material in the biblio- 
graphy as you can get your hands on before 
getting started. But do get started. ATV is 
the most exciting aspect of our hobby that 
Tve encountered, and I think you'll agree. 




Bibliographv 
ATV Experimenter Anthology 
Amateur Television - Let*s Get Started, 73 Maga- 
zine, Oct and Nov. I 966, K3ADS. 
FM Subcarrier Generator, 73 Magazine, April 
I967,W60RG. 

ATV Video Modulator, 73 Magazine, June 1969 
W60RG. 

ATV; Getting a Better Picture, 73 Magazine, Aug. 

1970, WA6BJV. 

ATV is Easy, 73 Magazine, Feb, 1971, K20JL. 



32 



73 MAGAZINE 



MAXIMUM 

PERFORMANCE 



Stephen J, Burns WA3CXG 
1 26 East Walnut Park Drive 
PhUadeiphia PA 19120 



FOR 



SMALL YAGIS 



A grid of small dimensions in place of the usual 
parasitic element will increase both gain and F/B ratio. 



Many hams face the problem of con- 
structing an effective low band an- 
tenna within a limited space — the roof of a 
row house for example. Long Yagis are 
clearly ruled out, and cubical quads are not 
without their disadvantages. However^ by a 
simple adaptation of the screen reflector 
principle long in use in amateur VHF work 
and currently popular for UHF TV recep- 
tion, the performance of a larger array can 
be approached- 

The Problem 

The trouble with all (particularly small) 
parasitic arrays is that neither forward gain 
nor front to back ratio can be maximized 
independently of each other, or of useful 
bandwidth either. Use of a screen reflector 
element of moderate size as described below 
will permit the user to obtain close to the 
full theoretical value of gain, and better F/B 
ratio than can be realized with a single 
parasitic element in its place. But does a 
decibel more off the front and a few less off 
the back really matter? 

I believe it does. Particularly in the 
amateur service — where power input is 
limited by law, and contacts are by chance 
and the vagaries of the ionosphere. The radio 
transmission loss (defined as the ratio of 
radiated power to received power) typically 
observed in long distance communication is 
tremendous. Suppose your good friend in 
QZ9 land is putting a modest two hundred 
watts into the aether, and one microvolt of 
it finds its way into your receiver. 



By P = E^/R, that's a meager fiftieth of a 
microwatt J or 160 dB less than came out of 
the transmitting antenna. When conditions 
are marginal, or the competition fierce, it is 
then that the extra care paid to, say, using 
RG-17/U (low loss) instead of RG-58/U, 
Type N (constant impedance) rather than 
UHF connectors and other * 'small detaUs" 
pays off. 

Every decibel counts. As applied to an- 
tennas this means the best gain and F/B ratio 
available per usable area. But a limited space 
ham need not settle for a limited perfor- 
mance antenna. 

A Solution 

An ideal (infinite) screen reflector anten- 
na has the basic properties summarized in 
Fig. I. Thanks to the inverse square law, 
among other physical phenomena, a practi- 
cal reflector can be made relatively small in 
terms of wavelength and yet be nearly as 
effective. Moullin has shown both theoreti- 
cally and by experimentation that there is 



10 








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REFLECTOR TO DIPOLE DfSTANCE. D/A 

Fig. 1. 



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JULY 1973 



33 



mmt 



30 



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SCREEN HEJGHT. H/X 



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Fig. 2, 

no substantial difference in performance 
between an infinite reflector and one slightly 
over 4/5 wavelength in height and 1/2 
wavelength in width. 

That's still fairly big for 15 meters^ my 
favorite band. However^ performance still 
drops off fairly slowly beyond this point. 
Figure 2 shows the variation of front to back 
ratio with reflector height for a fixed spacing 
of 1/5 wavelength- 

Even so, one surely can*t erect a large 
reflector made of aluminum fort! Theoreti- 
cally, a parellel wire grid will appear the 
same as a solid sheet if the self inductance of 
the wires is equal and opposite to the mutual 
inductance between them. (The antenna is 
then properly called a grid reflector.) For 
small values of wire diameter relative to 
wavelength, the proper spacing of filaments 
is S = 15D/4, where S is the spacing and D 
the diameter of the wires, both expressed in 
the same units. Still, that's a might tight 
(and bulky) network- 
Experimental Results 

To determine the effect of increased 
failment spacing on performance, scaled 
down models for the 432 (3/4 meter) band 
were constructed. Because of the simplicity 
of the equipment employed only relative, 
not absolute, field strength measurements 
could be made. Nonetheless, I have deter- 
mined that regardless of wire size, inter- 
filament spacings of about X/40 of less result 
in the same polar radiation pattern as the 
theoretically dictated one, (Vertical radia- 
tion patterns could not be relaiably deter- 
mined, however.) That pattern is shown in 
Fig. 3- It should be noted though that the 
tuning stub on the driven element had to be 
adjusted for minimum standing waves each 
time the spacing was changed, indicating 
slight impedance variations with inter- 
fUament spacing. 



/ 



^^ — 


To^"*^^^,^^^^ 




v\ 


-OB ^ 
-0.6 / 
-0.4 / 


\ 


2700 \^ ^^^Xli 


A^ / 


f 

90° 


V 


I8OO 


^ 



Fiq. 3. TypioaX horizontal radiation pattern. 

Construction Notes 

My original antenna was a two element 
homemade 15 meter beam with the parasitic 
element tuned as a director and spaced 
0.1 IX from the driven element. A forward 
gain of 4 dB and a F/B ratio of 12 dB was 
realized; these figures can be taken as a 
typical compromise- 
Two bamboo poles (chosen fox lightness 
and cheapness, for this was just the proto- 
type) somewhat over ten feet in length were 
mounted vertically on the ends of the 
parasitic element, now tuned as a reflector 
and spaced J 5X. See Fig. 4. Twelve lengths 
of #15 soUd wire, each the same length as 
the relfector, were strung parallel thereto 
and spaced about ten inches (about X/50) 



BAMBOO POLE 



U' BO LIS 




10X25 CM METAL PLATE 
CURVED TO FIT REFLECTOR 



Fig. 4, Mounting of the vertical memher on the 
reflector. 



34 



73 MAGAZINE 



WIRE GRID 



INSULATORS 



REFLECTOR 




DRIVEN 
ELEMENT 



Fig. 5. Possible alternate configuration for lower 
frequency ban ds, 

apart. The antenna was then raised to its 
original height of forty fe;et, with the 
point of support having been shifted con- 
siderably toward the grid. 

Findings 

On the air testing followed, comparing 
the performance of the new array with that 
of the dipole relative to which the original 
antenna was proved. Forward gain is in the 
order of 5 dB, and front to back ratio 20 dB. 
More subiective tests indicate that it com- 
pares favorably with a neighbor's com- 
mercial tribander for both short and long 
haul communications. 

After successfully weathering a 
Philadelphia winter, the antenna was 
lowered for inspection and dismantled. New 
construction techniques are being developed 
for using this limited size grid reflector 
method on lower frequency bands. Shown in 
Fig. 5 is a sketch of the configuration 
currently under investigation for 20 meters. 

For those many hams who, like myself, 
simply don't have the space available to 
lengthen their array, the type of antenna 
described in this article provides one further 
step toward full-size performance. Construc- 
tion is simple, and the results are en- 
couraging. Try it and see. 

, . .WA3CXG 





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References 
Henry Jasik, ed,. Antenna Engineering Handbook, 
New York, 1961. 

John Kraus, Antennas, New York, 1950. 

E.B. MouUin, Radio Aerials, Oxford, 1949 



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JULY 1973 



35 




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for 12 db Sinad. 

Selectivity — Adjacent channel (40 
KHz} down 50 db. 

Each crystal does triple-duty, pro- 
viding a transmit and receive fre- 
quency (Crystal Saver Frequency 
Control). 

Monolithic crystal filten 

Compact, 7" x 2%" x 9" 



Amateur Net $299.95 



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Tel: (717) 299-3671 Totox: 84-0438 



36 



73 MAGAZINE 



AN 



ACCURATE 



J.G. Sanders W4HSA 
303 Morton Circle 
Smyrna GA 30080 



FREQUENCY 




The following material describes a ver- 
satile test instrument which may be 
constructed by the average amateur. It may 
be used as a calibration standard for receiv- 
ere^ VFO's, transmitters, audio oscillators, 



1 WH2 
DSC ' 


7490 
' -10 ' 


. 7490 ^ 
^-lO ' 


7490 


7490 
^-»0 ' 


^ 7490 


7490 


n 






















1 






1 






1 1 


1 . 


1 








^>66i 


"> i>66 









\ 



vl^ 



OUTPUT' 



- o »o- 



o^ 



1/2 7476 

♦ 



1/2 7476 
-r2 

* 



1/2 7476 
-r2 

* 



1/2 7476 
-r2 



T 



ted devices may be satisfactory even up to 
IS MHz. 

Before presenting any detailed informa- 
tion it might be worthwhile to explain 
several points of interest about the circuit. 
Firsts the reader will note that the crystal 
oscillator circuit has been omitted. We as- 
sume that the average builder has a pet 
transistor oscillator circuit which he knows 
will work for him. Also, the circuit wiU 
depend upon the frequency of the crystal 
employed. Capacitor CI was placed across 
the output of the unit to reduce switch- 
ing noise appearing in the output wave- 
form. For this purpose it works satisfac- 




AC 



II7VAC 



AC 



I I7\«C-6.3VAC 
O^AMP 



BRrDGE 

RECTIRER 

MODULE 

OR 

E>*0OE 

BRIDGE 



T4OOO 
-J— 15V 



-JXi 




^-lOVDC 



5VDC 
180 MA 



Fig, I, Simplified block diagram of frequency jrfg 2, 5V dc power supply using voltage divider 
standard network. 



and oscilloscopes. While my particular cir- 
cuit used a 1 MHz crystal, there is no reason 
why a 100 kHz, 5 MHz, or other unit could 
not be substituted. The IC's in the circuit are 
suitable for operation up to 10 MHz. Selec- 



torily. However, in applications where high 
harmonic content is desired CI should be 
removed. Notice that no output coupling 
capacitor or other means of isolation has 
been provided. This unit was to be used with 



' 


OBTAfNABLE SWITCH SELECTED FREQUENCtES 




T, 000, 000 Hz 


500,000 Hz 


250,000 Hz 


1 25,000 Hz 


62,500 Hz 


100,000 Hz 


50,000 Hz 


25,000 Hz 


1 2,500 Hz 


6,250 Hz 


10.000 Hz 


5,000 Hz 


2,500 Hz 


1,250 Hz 


625 Hz 


1,000 Hz 


500 Hz 


250 Hz 


125 Hz 


62.5 Hz 


100 Hz 


50 Hz 


25 Hz 


12.5 Hz 


6.25 Hz 


10 Hz 


5 Hz 


2.5 Hz 


1.25 Hz 


0.625 Hz 


1 Hz 


0.5 Hz 


0.25 Hz 


0.125 Hz 


0.0625 Hz 



37 



I MHZ 
XTAL OSC 
(YOUR 
CIRCUIT) 



I-+5V 




Fig. 3- Frequency standard wiring diagram. 



other integrated circuit equipments and 
therefore nothing was required. Do not 
apply more than 5V dc to the output 
terminal at any time or destruction of the 
ICs will result- Some builders may require a 
more stable output voltage. The power 
supply shown is satisfactory for most appU- 
cations of the frequency standard. A UA723 
voltage regulator and pass transistor may be 
added, if desired, to yield a stable pulse 
ampUtude. 

If built as shown in the circuit diagram, 
the unit will produce a 2 volt square wave at 
the frequencies shown in Tabte 1- The 
accuracy of the higher frequencies will de- 
pend entirely upon how accurately you zero 
the crystal oscillator to WWV. A good idea is 
to listen to WWV on 25 MHz and work for a 
25th harmonic zero beat, or as close as you 
can get/Back down at 1 MHz this will be a 



quite reliable signal. Division of the 1 MHz 
signal even further by the unit results in a 

■ 

highly accurate standard for the average 
amateur station. 

All integrated circuit devices are 14 pin 
dual in-line packages except the 7476 dual 
J-K flip-flops; which use a 16 pin package, A 
prototype printed circuit card for dual in- 
line package ICs was used for construction 
with wires run as shown on SK-3, Some 
builders may desire to fabricate their own 
boards and eliminate the wires. 

Numerous modifications of the basic cir- 
cuit are possible. In the interest of low cost 
and simpMcity, most of the frills of com- 
mercially available pulse generators have 
been left out. What remains is an accurate 
source of frequency^ TTL logic pulses, time 
interval markers^ and audio. 

. . .W4HSA 



38 



73 MAGAZINE 




DIGITAL 



Matiraji (Marty) Snow KIOZS 
273 Commonwealth Ave, 
Attieboro Falls MA 02763 



IDENTIFICATION 




A TTL identifier that can he assembled, program- 
med and put into operation quickly. Adding a few 
components transforms the unit into a self4denti' 
fying electronic keyen 



The automatic generation of call signs is 
not new and a great many methods 
have been offered in the past. The older 
designs used often unreliable mechanical 
means, while most of the new electronic 
designs, although reliable , require several 
sheets of paper to figure out the program- 
ming- The unit to be described here uses 
stateof-t he-art, inexpensive TTL logic and 
can be programmed in your head. To date 
nine units have been in use for almost a year 
in repeaters, RTTY stations, a CW station 
and a VHF beacon without any failures or 
wrong calls observed. After collecting aU the 
parts and the PC board, the unit can be 
assembled, programmed and operating in less 
than 45 minutes. 

How it Works 

Chip Ul is a type 7400 quad two input 
nand gate. Sections a and b are set up in a 
free running multivibrator. Its operation is 
exactly like the transistor versions in the 



handbook. Pins 9-10 and 12-13 act as the 
bases and pins 8 and 1 1 act as the collectors 
of NPN transistors. The emitter is grounded 
internally. If the multivibrator should hesi- 
tate to run, momentarily connect a jumper 
between ground and the positive side of 
either capacitor Because this circuit is ac 
coupled, it can turn on in a stable state. 
Once it is running, however, it won't stop 
until power is removed- Sections c and d are 
redundant and were used because they were 
in the chip and might provide some noise 
immunity. The clock pulse enters section c 
at pin 2. A control signal enters at pin I . The 
control signal is a logic 1 (+5V) while the ID 
is running, thus allowing the clock pulse to 
exit at pin 3. When the ID is hot running, 
the control signal is a logic (OV) which 
closes the gate. This control signal is brought 
out on pin V along with its inverted function 
on pin U to control other low level functions 
that you might have need for. Section d is an 
inverter. The gated clock pulse enters on 



JULY 1973 



39 



>2 •« 

300 MA^ 



>A/V^ ^ FIXED SPEED* 




VARIASLE SPEED" 



EXTERNAL CTRL 



U 



MOMENTARY 
CLOSE STARTS 



KEY LINE 



CLARE CO. 
PRME lAOOSe 



• If fixed and variable speed controls 
are used, ground to board. 



Fig^ i, KIOZS diode programmed CW identifier. 



pins 4 and 5 and exits at pin 6 with the 
opposite phase. 

Chip U2 is a type 7490 decade counter- 
Pin 2 is a reset to 0000 command. When it is 
at logic 1, as when the ID is stopped, the 
output count is forced to 0000 and cannot 
change even if clock pulses were applied, 
When the ID starts, the control signal goes to 
a logic and the decade can count. Pin 6 is a 
reset to lOOL It is not used in this applica- 
tion and must be grounded. The 7490 is 
built in two sections internally and needs to 
be joined at pins 12 and 1 to get a decade 
count- When the ID is started, the clock 
pulse enteis at pin 14 and the output counts 
in binary code, as shown in Fig. 2. Each time 
pin 1 1 goes from 1 to it trips flip-flop U4. 
The four outputs from the decade counter 
go to the four inputs of U3, a 74145 one of 
ten decoder. The ten outputs of U3 are the 
collectors of ten NPN transistors^ only one 
of which is on at any one time, that one 
being determined by the binary code at the 
inputs. If the input were 0000 and you were 
to measure all the outputs, you would find 
that pin 1 would conduct to ground and all 
the others would measure open. When the 
count changed to 1000 the on transistor 



would move from pin I to pin 2 and so on 
up to 1001 where the on transistor would be 
at pin 1 1 with aU the others being off. 

U4 and U5 act as an eight counter and 
control the start-stop functions of the ID, 
When the unit is at rest the outputs from 
U5b are: pin 9 = 1, pin 8 = 0. Pin 8 is the 
origin of the control function that goes to 
Ul and gates the clock. It also goes to U5a 
pin 2 and U4 pins 2 and 6, forcing the 
outputs of these flip-flops to equal 000. Pin 
9 is the control function for the 7490 that 
forces it to 0000 output. Pin 6 of U5b is the 
reset pin and is connected to +5V through a 
IK pull up resistor- If pin 6 is grounded for 



pin 



12 


9 


8 


11 














1 














1 








1 


1 














1 





1 





1 








1 


1 





1 


1 


1 














1 


1 








1 















Fig. 2. U2 7490 output. 



40 



73 MAGAZINE 




, v-s. 



r 



tr- 







O^^eralJ view of component side* 



1 u sec. or morej U5b will reset, thus 
inverting its outputs. ITiis removes the reset 
from U4a and b and U5a, allowing gate Ulc 
to pass the clock pulses and allows U2 to 
count. Each time pin 1 1 of U2 goes from 1 
to 0, U4a flips; each time U4a pin 12 goes 
from 1 to U4b flips, which in turn does 
the same to U5a which eventually does the 
same to USb as shown in Fig, 3. When U5b 
flipSj the control signals change back and 
stop everything until U5 pin 6 is again 
grounded. 

Chip IJ6 is a 74151, an eight channel 
multiplexer. It has eight input channels, any 
one of which can come out with the same 



pin 



U4 




U5 




12 9 


12 


9 


8 








1 


ID stopped 











1 start 


1 










1 










1 1 













1 







1 


t 







1 


1 







1 1 


1 













1 


i D stops 



Fig, 3. U4 and 5 output 



phase as it went in or can be read on the 
other output pin inverted. What channel is 
on the output depends on the BCD code on 

pins 11, 10 and 9. It they equal 000 only 
information applied to pin 4 will appear on 
pin 5 and its inverted form on pin 6, All 
other inputs will be ignored. If the code 
changes to 1 1 - 1 and 10 and 9 = only 
information applied to pin 3 will appear on 
the output and so on up to It, 10 and 9-1 
at which time only information appUed to 
pin 12 would appear on the output All 
inputs are connected to +5V through IK 
pull up resistors to assure that they return to 
a 1 state quickly. 

The diode matrix is the memory and is 
read by U6 and driven by U3. Figure 4 
shows a simplified version that wiU be easier 
to follow. It is read from left to right, top to 
bottom, just like a book. For an example. 
Let's program this small matrix to send dit 
dah dit dah. Before the start signal is given 
the ID is at rest and pin 1 of U 3 is grounded 
because that transistor is turned on. Chip U6 
is listening only to channel one on input pin 
4 which is pulled up to a 1 by the IK 
resistor. The relay is connected to +5V on 
one end and +5V through the chip and a IK 



JULY 1973 



41 



■fe 




See Press 



f/f i/ \^ m m m 




mm 



He'll beat any deal anywhere 1 

Telephone us at NO CHARGE anywhere hi the U.S.A. 

If you make an order, send us a copy of your telephone bill and we'll send you a check. 

PLUS, we ship FREE anywhere by U.P.S. 



4033 BROWNSVILLE RD., TREVOSE, PA. 19047 



r 



1 



42 



73 MAGAZINE 




Ha I lie rafters' Best — the 
SR-2000 with AC sup- 
ply & a FREE Bird 43 
wattmeter with Case & 
lOOOWSIug. 



t645 





'^ HALUCRAFTERS' SIGGESI - with the best to measure it! 



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s 



i 




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The Cyclone III — with the A.C. 
Power Supply & FREE MorGain 
75-10 Folded Dipole Antenna, 100 
ftof RG8&AW2AU Balun. 




7/24 



95 



^A DX€n'S DK/ClfT" plug in the mike and go 



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I 



(215)3571400 



PHONES 



(215)757 5300 



IH 



JULY 1973 



43 




Circuit board, component side (full size). 



resistor on the other end. No current flows 
and the relay is open or "key up." When the 
start signal is given the first clock pulse steps 
U3, TI turns off and T2 turns on, grounding 
the line connected to its collector. Current 
now flows from +5V through the relay to 



Dl and ground, thus closing the relay. The 
second clock pulse turns T2 off and T3 on. 
Now no ground path is present for the relay 
and it opens, having completed the fh-st dit 
of our character. The next clock pulse turns 
T3 off and T4 on, again providing the 



44 



73 MAGAZINE 




Circuit boardt reverse side (full size). 



ground path and closing the relay. The next 
clock pulse turns T4 off and Tl on. When 
T4 goes off it steps U4 which advances 06, 
so it is now listening only to signals applied 
to pin 3 which in this case is grounded 
through D3 and Tl, which causes the relay 



to remain closed. Because of the speed of 
the switching, the relay doesn't get a chance 
to open while U6 is changing channels. The 
next clock pulse turns Tl off. and T2 on, so 
the relay still conducts through D4- The 
next clock pulse allows it to open. The 



JULY 1973 



45 




I 



Close-up of matrix programmed for mark to send WAIOMS, 



remainder of the matrix is read in the same 
manner until it gets to D8, at which time the 
relay is conducting. The final clock pulse 
turns T4 off and Tl on. When T4 goes off it 



U4 AND UB 
\ I J 

I l__l 





I 
I 

I PARTtAL U6 t 
L. ^ J 



Fig, 4. Simpiified version of the matrix. It is read 
from left to right, a horizontal row at a time, and 
is programmed to send dit dah dit dah. Dl is the 
first dit, D2f 3, 4 is the first dah, D5 is the second 
ditf etc. The blank areas between the bits are spaces. 



trips U4 which returns LJ6 to channel 1, and 
sends out the control signals which stop the 
ID. As you can probably see, if a diode were 
placed at the intersection of U4 pin 1 and 
U6 pin 4, the relay would be on even though 
the ID were stopped. Therefore this position 
must be open or it will keep the key down 
when not in use. 

The output relay used is the same size as 
the other chips, and it is sufficient to. key 
the audio line from an oscillator or grid 
block key a low power transmitter. If higher 
power is to be keyed, a larger keying relay 
must be used with a transistor driver. Printed 
circuit for the driver and room for a larger 
relay are provided on the PC board. 

Programming 

There are two ways the diode matrix can 
be programmed, mark or space. Mark pro- 
gramming is like that described above in the 
small example matrix. Diodes are placed 
where you want the relay to close. To get a 
dot, use one diode, for a dash uses three 
diodes in a row. Spacing between dots or 
dashes in the same character is one space and 



46 



73 MAGAZINE 




H 



Close-up of matrix programmed for space to send deKl OZS. 



between characters it is three spaces. When 
marks are programmed , connect the low side 
of the relay marked as C on the PC board to 
M which is pin 5 of U6. Because U6 also has 
an inverted output it gives us the option of 
programming for space. To do this simply 
put the diodes everywhere you would not 
put them when programming for mark, and 
leave them out where you would have put 
them when using mark. Connect the relay 
terminal marked C to S, which is pin 6 of 
U6- Note also that when programming for 
space a diode must be included at the 
intersection of U3 pin 1 and U6 pin 4. The 
capability to choose which way to program 
is handy if you are short on diodes, as one 
way usually uses fewer diodes. To decide 
which way to go, write your call out in code 
as in the example - — • — and count up the 
number of diodes needed for mark. One 
diode for a dit and three for a dash. In this 
case we get eight for this one character. If 
the number is forty or less, program for 
mark; if it is over forty subtract the number 
from eighty and that is the number of diodes 
to use to program for space. 



Construction 

The value of all components are marked 
on the PC board so placement should be no 
problem. The chips should be mounted in 
sockets, but may be soldered in if you are 
sure of them- The best type of socket to use 

in this case would be Molex pins because 
unless your PC board has plated-through 
holes, the pins must be soldered on both 
sides if a track comes to that pin on the 
component side. The board I used did not 



RAD WITH 
NO TRACK 
OO NOTSOLDEfl 




PAD WITH THkQK 
SOLDER 



mo WITH TRACK 
SOLOER 



Fig. 5. Method of mounting the matrix diodes. 



JULY 1973 



47 




RELAY 



+-5V0C 

CLAfiE ca 

PRME 
lAOO&B 



Ig, 6. One chip and two transistors add an electronic keyer to the ID unit at the three points marked 
with an "X/' 



have plated-through holes, and I didn't have 
any Molex pins, I found that by elevating 
the socket with a piece of board and bending 
the iron tip, the pins cguld be soldered 
without much difficulty. Solder the compo- 
nent side first so the joints are reheated 
when soldering the back, thus reducing the 
possibihty of a cold solder joint. The diodes 
are mounted as shown in Fig. 5. All diodes 
used were 1N277 but many diodes were 
tried and they all worked. The card plugs 
into a Vector #980 socket. 

Three methods of speed control are provi- 
ded: (1) a small Bourns trimpot may be 
mounted on the card or (2) an external pot 
can be run between pin Z and ground. (3) 
Once the desired speed is found, the pot can 
be measured and a fixed resistor chosen and 
mounted on the PC board at the location 
marked "R fixed speed," No more than one 
method can be used at any one time. 

No 5V supply is shown, but it should be 
capable of 300 mA, A simple regulator 
works well- For additional protection a VzA 
fast blow fuse followed by a 6V zener to 
ground can be used. If the power supply 



should go above 6V the zener wLQ draw 
enough current to blow the fuse. 

Other Applications 

To make the ID useful to the CW station, 
one chip, two transistors and a few cent 
ponents need to be added so it includes an 
electronic keyer No PC board has been laid 
out at this time, but the schematic is 
included in Fig. 6 for those who would like 
an electronic key that at the touch of a 
button would send out their call at the same 
speed the electronic key is runing! Note that 
when using this schematic the matrix must 
be programmed for mark. The circuit may 
be broken at the points marked X, and you 
have a TTL version of the W9T0 keyer. 

Circuit Boards 

Etched and drilled double sided circuit 
boards for the digital identification unit 
described in this article can be had for $8,95 
postpaid from MFJ Enterprises, P.O. Box 
494, Mississippi State MS 69762, 

- . KIOZS 



48 



73 MAGAZINE 



a new 
standard 
of comparison 





«#» 





KENWOOD^S SUPERB 
SSB TRANSCEIVER 



FEATUf^ES: • Break- in CW with sidetone • Built-in 
100 KHz and 25 KHz crystal oscillator * Built - In RIT 
and RIT indicator light • Built - in RTTY frequency 
shiHforFSK • Built- in noise blanker • Built - in VOX 
* Modular construction — repair in or out of 



strong signals • Completely solid state except final 
section • 1 KHz readout 

GE^£RAL SPECIFICATIONS: Frequency Range: 3.5 - 
30 MHz Amateur Bands and WWV * Mode: SSB. CW, 
or FSK • Power Outpyt: 150 watts PEP nomirtal into 
50 ohms for SSB, 100 watts nominal into 50 ohms for 
CW, 50 watts nominal into 50 ohms for FSK 

• Frequency Stability: Within 100 Hz during any 15 
minute period after warmup. Within ± 2 KHz during the 
first hour after 1 minute of warmup • Receiver 
Sensitivity: O.S microvolts for a 10 db (signal ^ 
notse)/nolse ratio • Receiver Selectivity: SSB and 
FSK — 2^ KHz bandwidth (6 db down), 4.4 KHz 
bandwidth (60 db down), CW — 0.5 KHz bandwidth 
{6db down), 1.5 KHz bandwidth (60 db down), (with 
optional CW filter installed) * Oimenstons: 12.6' wide 

* 5,5" high ^ 12J" deep • Weight: 26.5 pounds {32,5 
pounds shipping weight) • Price: TS - 900 $795.00, PS 
- 900 {AC Supply) $120.00, DS - 900 (DC Supply) 
$140.00, VFO - 900 (Remote VFO) $195,00, 



1^ ss 



NEW SOLID STATE 



THE KENWOOD R-599 RECEIVER . . . L8 to 29 7 MHz 

(Amateur Bands) • Dial readout to V^ KHz • Special 
detectors for SSB< AM, and FM • Transceive operatron 
with T-599 • Byjlt-in 100 KHz and 25 KHz calibrators 
• Built in 500 cycle CW filler • Provision for 2 meter 
and 6 meter coverage with accessory self-contained 
converters • 120/240 VAC or 12 VDC operation ** *^' 
solid state 
S-599 Speaker — $16.00. 

THE KENWOOD T599 TRANSMITTER .,, Clear, stable, 



i 

plus RIT when used with the R'599 • Amplified ALC • 
Built-in VOX • Full metering • Built-in CW sidetone 
monitor and semi-dutomatic break-in CW • Built-in 
power supply for 120/240 VAC operation • Only 3 vac- 
uum tubes • 200 watts PEP inpul nominal • Full ama- 
teur band coverage (3.5 to 30 MHz). T-599 — $429.00 

THE KENWOOD TS511S TRANSCEIVER .,. a powerful 
five band transceiver (3.5 to 30 MHz, amateur bands) 
for operatron on SSB and CW • Built in VOX • Built in 
crystal calibrator • Built in noise blanker • Receiver 
Incremental Tuning (RIT) • 1 KHz frequency readout • 
Eight pole Filter • Exceptional stability • Provisions for 
installation of an accessory high selectivity CW filter • 
500 watts PEP input for SSB • .5 /xv sensitivity nominal 
• Full metering — Cathode current (IP), plate voltage 
(HV), ALC, and relative power output (RF) as well as an 
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external power supply. TS-SllS — $415.00 PS-511S — 
$105.00 VF0-5SS — $105.00 CW 1 — $39.00 



Kenwood Dealers; CALIFORNIA Ham Radio Outlet, Burllngame • Henry Radio^ Anaheim • Henry 
Radio, Lo4 Angeles • Webster Radio, Fresno • COLORADO Radio Communication Co., Arvada 
FLORIDA Amateur Electronic Supply, Oriando • Amateur-Wholesale Electronics, Miami • Slep Electron- 
ics Co.. Ellenton 9 ILLINOIS Erickson Communications, Chicago • Klaus Radio, Peoria • INDIANA 
Graham Electronics, Indianapolis • Radio Distributing, South Bend • IOWA Hobby Industry, Council 
Bluffs # KANSAS Associated Radio Communications, Overland Park • LOUtSIANA Trionics. New 
Orleans • MAINE Down East Ham Shack, Lewiston • MARYLAND Professional Electronics, Baltimore 
MICHIGAN Electronic Distributors, Muskegon • Radio Supply & Engineering, Detroit * MINNESOTA 
Electronic Center, Minneapolis • MISSOURI Ham Radio Center, St, Louis • Henry Radio, Butler 
MONTANA Conley Radio Supply, Billings • NEW JERSEY Simon Sideband, Oak Ridge • NEW YORK 
Adirondack Radio Supply, Amsterdam • Harrison Radio, Farmtngdale and NYC • NORTH CAROLINA 
Vickers Electronics^ Durham • OHiO Amateur Electronic Supply, Cleveland • Communications World, 
Cleveland • Queen City Electronics, Cincinnatti • Srepco Electronics, Dayton • OKLAHOMA Derrick 
Electronics^ Broken Arrow • Radio Inc., Tulsa • OREGON Portland Radio Supply, Portland • PENN- 
SYLVANIA JRS Distributors, York • Kass Electronics, Drexel Hill m SOUTH DAKOTA Surghardt Ama- 
teur Center, Watertown • TEXAS Douglas Electronics, Corpus Christ! • Industrial Distributors, Dallas 
Ed Juge Electronics, Fort Worth and Dallas • Madison Electronics, Houston « UTAH Manwilt Supply, 
Salt Lake City • WISCONSIN Amateur Electronic Supply, Milwaukee 
(Prices subject to change without notice) 




JULY 1973 



49 



REPEATER 




These maps are part of the National Topographic Map 
Series published by the Geological Survey, which includes 
several series of quadrangle and other topographic maps of 
the United States, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, American 
Samoa, and Guam, 



NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS 
I 250000SCALE SERIES 




LIKI l**t Oil atirtltl VOi n tvUL^lit 1% 4D91 

no* ro i»kau9 rorqciwinc imp futa Ttn* 




tMQV' rnVtU-AMLW 



HOW TO ORDER MAPS 



Published maps are indicated by name and date of survey. Where two dates are shown, the first 
indicates the last year of survey for the basic information and the second date, the year in which 
limited revision was made. This revision generally consists only of the addition of such features as 
major highways, airports^ dams, and reservoirs. 

Most topographic maps are available either with or without green woodland overprint. Specify 
which edition is desired and whether substitution of the other edition is acceptable. 

The list price of each map in the l:250,000-scale series is $1, Prepayment is required and may be 
made by money order or check, payable to the Geological Survey, or in cash - the exact amount - at 
the sender*s risk. Postage stamps are not acceptable. 



50 



73 MAGAZSNE 



At a scale of 1 : 250,000, I inch on the map represents about 4 miles 
on the ground. Because of the limitations of this scale, detail is 
somewhat generalized and some small features are omitted. These maps 
are useful in planning projects extending over large areas, such as 
selection of radio station sites, and absolutely necessary in preparing 
repeater license applications. 




m»r\ *iJNo iw( u*iin> nTftTf^ mEnicn &o<j«n**T iHr.niM »■{«- 

Ift Itll UNlllb !ITaII; tiNit tHtm JILDN4, lll[ i)*i\HQ ITJiTIS' 

CANJID4 BDI,hr«a«^HV I^CLIjni. ARIAS |K ilZAtfADA 



For transmittal of maps outside the United States, (except 
Canada and Mexico) a surcharge of 25 percent of the net amount is 
added for surface transportation. If purchaser pays air transporta- 
tion costs, the surcharge is waived. 

Send to U.S. Geological Survey, Washington DC 20242. 



Maps can also be 
bought directly at 
U.S,G,S. Public In- 
quiries Offices at 
the following ad- 
dresses: 

lOSSkyUne Building 
508- 2nd Avenue 
Anchorage, Alaska 99501 



7638 Federal Building 
300 North Los Angeles Street 
Los AngeleSj California 90012 

504 Custom House 

555 Battery Street 

San Francisco, California 94 1 1 1 

1012 Federal BuUdtng 

1961 Stout Street 

Denver, Colorado 80202 

8102 Federal Office Building 
125 South State Street 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 

1C45 

1 100 Commerce Street 

Dallas, Texas 75202 

678 U.S- Courthouse 

West 920 Rh^erside Avenue 

Spokane, Washington 99201 



JULY 1973 



51 



2 Meter FM 

THE BIG THREE 
FOR 73! 



GTX-10 

10 watts output power nom.; ac- 
comodates 10 channels; rotatable 
frequency selector; adaptable for 
portable operation (with HamPak, 

$199.95 

(Includes 148.94 MHz) 




GTX-2 

30 watts output power nom.; ac- 
comodates 10 channels; push- 
button frequency selection; back- 
lighted for night operation. 



$249-35 

(Includes 148.94 MHz] 




GTX-200 

30 watts output power nom.; ac- 
comodates 100 channel combina- 
tions; features independent selec- 
tion of transmit and receive fre- 
quencies, and switch for pre- 
selected pairing, -i^-fc— i-^ ««-. 

$259-95 

(Includes 146J4 MHz) 




Made in USA. 
In Facilities in- 
spected by U. S 
Gov't 




HamPak 

Battery pack for GTX-10 
portable operation. Uses 
10 D cells (not included), 

(Itfciudes portath antenna, 
carrying handle & mike cflp) 




Additional 

CryttflVs 

for Xinit or receli^e 



$6.50 

per crystal 



VISIT YOUR LOCAL AMATEUR DEALER 



AND MEET THE "BIG THREE' 




PERSON! 



Gsntral Aniatinn Elictronics, Inc., 4141 Mngmati DrlKC, IndiaRapolis, Indiatia 4E226 - Ares 317 - 546-11 II 



52 



73 MAGAZINE 



Dave Ingram K4TWJ 

Rte. 11, Box 499, Eastwood Vil 50 N 

Birmingham AL 35210 





DXING TOO 



Say, have you been thinking about going 
mobile but have been putting it off 
thinking possibly the cost would n*t really 
warrant it? Possibly you feel you're not 
really in the car enougji to enjoy mobile 
operation. Maybe you've heard it's too much 
of a disadvantage to make it worthwhile. 
Mobile hamming does have its advantages, 
though. 

You can, for example, take advantage of 
a good location, like atop a choice hill in an 
extremely quiet place. And usually a DX 
station will try a httle harder to pull a 
mobile through to prove his rig is top-notch. 

If you*re running mobile now, you may 
not really be pleased with the way you get 
out. You say you're not working much DX 
mobile? Afraid to get in the pileups or go 
after the semi rare **g oodles?" Well, read on, 
amigo. 

Let*s take it from scratch and assume you 
have the bare essentials (an auto and the 
desire). 

If you want an inexpensive rig, you can 
pick up one of the used single -banders for 
under $100; the popular Heath power sup- 
ply wiU power practically all the medium 
power transceivers. If you want to roU your 



INSIDE VIEW OF LEFT FRONT FENDEft 




PLATE BOLTEO 
TO FEI^OER 
CURVATURE 




DC SUPP^LY 
MOUHfED TO 
PL ATI: 




Fig, 1, Power supply mounted against metal car 
body for maxiinum heatsinking. 



own power supply. Triad's TY series of 
toroids are very nice and come with a 
complete schematic packed along with them 
for typical power suppUes, If you are really 
gung-ho J uncased toroids are quite plentiful 
these days. There have a been a number of 
articles on using these in dc power supplies, 
so it won*t be covered here. 

When you mount that supply, remember 
to put it under the hood against a flat 
surface to dissipate the heat into the car 
body. If your fenders don*t have a flat 
surface, use a Seezac plate mounted onto the 
curvature of the fender, and mount the 
supply onto this. 

Bonding is important, not just to eUmi- 
nate ignition noise, but to give a more 
uniform ground and thus a lower swr. Using 
heavy braid, such as the shielding from a 
length of RG-8/U, ground the hood on both 
sides near the windshield at hinges to body, 
motor front and back on both sides to body, 
tailpipe in at least three places to body, and 
trunk, both sides at hinges to body. Be sure 
to put braid under the bolts in aU cases for a 
solid contact — and for pete's sake, ground 
the mobile rig to the car body. 

Antennas 

The antennas manufactured today are 
much better than the old ''whips," and it's 
well worth the cost to invest in one of the 
new chrome jobs; again, if you want to try a 
dandy antenna, why not a phased pair? Use 
two identical antennas and mount as far 
apart on rear deck or bumper as practical* 
Feed each with equal lengths of transmission 
line (SOU, like RG/8U or Belden^s low loss 
8214) spaced on each side of the car (length 
is approximately 640 cm). Terminate each in a 
PL-259 at rear of rig and use a tee connector 
(Amphenol 83 IT) for connection to the rig 
(see Fig. 2). 



JULY 1973 



53 



AMPHENOL 

3317 

"TEE"' 



XMSN tmi 




MEftSUflE COMPOSITE 
SWR HERE 



52 j\ 



TRANSCEIVER 



XMSN LINE 




EQUAL LENSTHS 
52^ TRANSMISSIOK LINE 



RG-i/y, Re-5B/U OH BELOEW #82 H 



DUAL AflTENNAS 




• 2. K4TWJls phased mobile verticals* 



The swr is worked out by connecting, 
each antenna, one at a time, to the rig, 
trying to get each swr as low as possible, 
the^i connect the two into the tee and 
measure the composite swr between tee and 
rig. This little system has worked quite well 
for me, and I have even tried adding a 
quarter wave to one leg of the feedline to 
change directivity. When doing this be sure 
to remember the one quarter wave also has 
to take in account velocity factor of the 
coax, thus one quarter wave X velocity 
factor of coax = actual length. The only 
problem with phasing is that it makes the 
antenna system basically a sin^e band job 
whereas feeding both in phase will work all 
bands. Naturally the system is at a disadvan- 
tage due to the close spacing, but it still gives 
good gain. Of course, the antennas will work 
better on say 10 meters than on 80 meters; 
but even on 80 meters- it will surprise you* 

If you*re running mobile at all be sure to 
throw in a compressor This will prove to be 
your best doUar-forniollar investment for the 



mobile rig. A compressor very often makes 
the difference on those DX QSOs. I have yet 
to find a time my compressor didn't give me 
at least a 5 dB gain and often up to 10 dB 
gain. I've found most units very nice 
and fairly inexpensive, but for the home- 
brewers there is usually a good compressor 
circuit in practically any ham magazine you 
pick up. I keep mine between the bucket 
seats so it is ready for those DX QSOs, 

If you would like to know what it's like 
•*being DX'* or to be on the other end of a 
pileup, try the county hunters nets while 
mobiling through those off-beat counties; 
but be prepared — sometimes the pileups get 
heavy and it's up to you to handle things 
efficiently without letting the calling get out 
of hand. Good locations are on borders of 
two or three counties at one time, thus you 
pass out three counties instead of just one. 
These guys are usually sharp on QSLs too, 
sending you blanks to fill in and sign, so cost 
is nil for you. The CHs are on 20 meters and 
40 meters every day and always listening for 
the rare mobiles. 

Mobile Speakers 

A speaker on the seat is handy when 
digging for that weak DX, but a bit awk- 
ward — first thing you know you either have 
the speaker to your ear or are leaning over 
like a typical drunk, I especially have a 
rough time because noise is extremely heavy 
in a convertible with the top down, thus the 
**DX Speaker" was born — the speaker (see 



CHASSIS WITH REAR 
PLATE AS DESCni9ED 
m TEXT 




Pig. 3, MobQe speaker acts almost like beadphoam^ 



54 



73 MAGAZINE 



The Hams at 
Heaih/schiumberger 

have a 

counter 

ofter: 



If you want test gear 
for the shack with 
famous Heath quality and 
performance at iow mail order 
prices, but don't have time to 
build a icit, try us. 

We're Heath/Schlumberger Scientific In- 
struments, a division of the Heath Com- 
pany ... the kit people. If you hold a ticket, 
you've probably heard of the Hams at 
Heath. 

But you've probably never heard of us. We 
deal primarlJy with industry, r&d labs and 
colleges and universities. And we don't 
make kits; we don't even make ham gear. 
What we do make is some of the finest test 
and design gear on the market... all fac- 
tory assembled and tested ... all specifica- 
tion-guaranteed for one full year ... all sold 
at low mail order prices. 

Our new SM-1 IOC Frequency Counter pic- 
tured above is a good example. It provides 
600 MHz range, 15 mV input sensitivity, 7 
digit LED readout and total computer or 
manual remote control capability for all 




functions. And It's only $795". We also 
have a 200 MHz counter (our SM-1 10A) for 
just $495' ... an 80 MHz model (SM-105A) 
for only $295*... and a scaler for $365* 
that will extend the range of your present 
counter to 600 MHz. 

We've got other goodies for your shack 
too: VOMs, DVMs, scopes, generators, 
power supplies . . . textbooks on basic and 
advanced electronics, digital techniques 
and computer logic... a complete line of 
plug-in digital and analog function circuit 
cards... all designed and manufactured in 
our own facilities ... but all with the famous 
Heath quality and value. 

Use the coupon below to send for our free 
1973 Electronic Instruments catalog now. 

•The Hams at Heath/Schlumberger: Chas, 
W8IAI; Tom, W8JAN; Norm. W8EEF; Jerry, 
K8KHS; Bob, K9EQB/8; Bill, K7IRC/8: 
Mike, WB8CDU; Owen, KSSJIYS; Lee. 
WA8PHL. 




1973 

Heath/ \ 

Schlumberger 

Electronic 
Instruments catalog 
send coupon now. 




HEATH 



Heatii/Schlumberger Scientific Instnimeflts 

Dept. 531-671 

B«nton Harbor, Michigan 49022 

D Please send 1973 Electronic Instiuments catalog. 



Schlumberger 



N3me. 



Address^ 



City- 



.State. 



Zip. 



Prices and specifications subject to change witliout notice, j 

*mi\ order prices; F,0*B. factory, EK'360 I 



Fig. 3) is made from an auto accessory **slip 
onto the seat" type of headrest, and a 
chassis. These slip-on headrests are readily 
available at most auto accessory shops and 
many large department stores. Since we 
don't use the top part of the headrest, only 
the bottom (the piece that slips over the top 
of the seat and has adjustable top extenders) 
a damaged headrest is the ideal bargain. Most 
stores will sell them for what they can get as 
it wouldn't be worth it to ship it back to the 
factory. I found a tan headrest with the top 
slit, and bought it from the manager for $1. 
Another dollar for a spray can of leather dye 
and it's black to match the car's interior. 
Now, measure for the *'speaker cabinet^' 
(chassis) leaving ample overlap for the mount- 
ing bracket. DriU the chassis in a pattern 
for the grille, mount the speaker, close the 
bottom (or rear) with a bottom plate and 
cover with vinyl to match interior. Now you 
have a fine looking speaker which, being 
right at your ear, is just like earphones. DX 
comes through like a pair of professional 
cans and with volume to spare when outside 
noises are high. (Stereo owners could put 
two speakers, one left and one right, rather 
than one in the middle, and wire it to their 
stereo). 

Other Ideas for Better Mobile DX 

Carry an ac supply in the trunk for those 
spontaneous portable excursions or when 
you are near ac lines. You would be sur- 
prised how often it will come in handy and 
give vou a chance at DXing you otherwise 




i4f^'»9< -=*v-s»»=*™r'-« 



■f- ,11, 7~ HH~T- 



Phased vertiCBls are quite an improveTuent over a 
whip. 



wouldn't have. You don't need a fancy 
supply, just one from junk parts - mine cost 
$5 and will run any transceiver under 300W. 

Next time you need a battery try the 
Delco Energizer group (used in police cars 
and ambulances, these batteries have a high 
ampere hour rating and are quite beefy). 

Extra sulfuric acid is available from bat- 
tery rebuilders and make nice, strong, 
healthy batteries out of the older ones. 

Also, 24-hour clocks are fairly common 
for DX-minded autos. These 24-hour clocks 
are on deluxe models of cars and are usually 
interchangeable with the '^economy" coun- 
terparts — for instance - the Pontiac GTO 
24-hour clock and Pontiac Le Mans or 
Tempest are interchangeable. A salvage yard 
is an inexpensive source of these. 

Most cars wMch have the antenna moun- 
ted on the rear have a slight gain over the 
right front fender, so try to face the car 
toward the direction you are caliiiig. It's 
often possible to get a reflection off water 
towers or buildings for a little extra gain — 
by putting the car about 20—30 ft, from the 
water tower, with tower behind antenna, 
and car pointed toward station you are 
calling. 

And, if you try CW mobile and don't 
have a CW monitor, try picking up your 
signal on the AM radio - usually I can get 
my keying with a fair tone toward the high 
end of the band (1400-1600 kHz). 

Procedures 

A little finesse is in order when operating 
mobile - if you indulge in p3eups. Be sure 
the word "mobile" makes it in during a lull 
in the pack calUng. Often 1 find things like 
"Alabama mobile*' followed by my call 
(which I know gets drowned out) catches 
the DX attention enough so they will give a 
special listen for me (this is when that 
speech compressor comes in handy). 

So there you have it, and the next time 
business calls or your vacation fa Us unavoid- 
ably during the DX contest, at least all won*t 
be lost, and you may soon find DXing 
mobae is not just a novelty. I still need 
things hke YB(Ji VU and 9N] mobile so the 
next time you hear me in a pileup give me a 

chance. 

. . .K4TWJ 



56 



73 MAGAZINE 



Hon Whitsei WA3AXV 
209 Frog Hollow Road 
ChurchvUie PA 18966 



450 MHz 



POWER 



I 



DIV 




The 420 MHz band is a mecca for 
amateurs who wish to construct elabo- 
rate antenna systems without undue strain 
on both their pocketbooks and towers, A 
common method of achieving this goal 
involves the stacking of many smaller arrays 
to form one high gain antenna system- Such 
a system requires the effective and efficient 
distribution of arriving energy in order to 
fully realize maximum potential perfor- 
mance. This article describes a ** power divi- 
der" which meets the above requirements 
and is easily constructed in the home work- 
shop . 

The design shown is for use with four 
identical 450 MHz antennas, each with a 
5 on unbalanced feed- The basic idea could 
be extended to other bands and impedance 
combinations. 

Basically, the device is two parallel con- 
nected quarter wavelength coaxial transfor- 
mers in an integral section of 5012 coaxial 
line. Each quarter wave transformer steps 
the* parallel combination of the 50f2 anten- 
nas (25n) up to 10012, The transformers in 
parallel then result in an impedance of 50J2 



to match the transmission line. Figure I 
illustrates the basic arrangement. 

Construction of the device is relatively 
simple and requires only a few basic hand 
tools, electric drill and a soldering torch. All 
necessary dimensions are given in Fig. 2, All 
joints are sweat soldered as you would do 
for any home plumbing job. The end caps 
and access hole cover are fabricated from 
copper flashing material. 

One further caution comes to mind* If 
the antenna ends of the homemade hardline 



50aO 



LI 






25AO 



IQQj^O 



lao-no 



50A0- 



L3 



I 25-^6 



50i|l 


L£ 


j% m /\ —. 






G SUA 


i* 1 






Zo-90A 






SOA ' 


L5 




^* i 






Zo'SOa [ 








L# 


— O50A 



Fig. 1. Basic arratigement of the power divider. LI 
L2 = L3 = L4. 



JULY 1973 



57 



IBI 



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in 



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Inquire about quantity 
prices. Order direct. 

Send check or money 
order 

For first class mail add 15C per 
crystal. ..for airmaif add 20C ea. 



DIVISIOI^ DF BOB 

WHAN & SON 
lUCTROMlCS, INC. 

2400 Crystal Dr. 

Fort Myers 

Florida 33901 

(813) 336-2397 

Send 10C for new 

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and lists of 

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stock. 




SPECtALSI CRYSTALS FOR: 

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100 KH: IHD13/0) M.50 

1000 KH; tMC6/U1 4.§0 

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Any Amateur Band ]n FT-243 1.50 

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SO Meter Range in FT-243 2.50 

Color TV 3579.545 KH/ jwire ttadsl 1.60 

4 for 5.00 



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• • 



NOISE 



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\JH\'VS 



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ELECTRO 
SHIELD 



CUSTOM SYSTEMS 
KITS* ACCESSORIES 



ELIMINATE IGNITION NOISE 

ELECTRO - SHIELD* 

YOUR ENGINE 



FROM 



ESTES ENGINEERING CO 

543 W. 184th St., Gardena, Calif. 90241 



EMO CAP 



8 CMt5/ie"} COPPER 

Ti>aiN6 



DIELECTRIC ft CENTER 
CONDUCTOR IR^*a FOAM) 



ACCESS MOLE 
COVER 




EQUAL LENSTH8 
OF HOME WADE 
HARDLINE - TO 
EACH OF rOUR 
»0 A LOADS 



Fig. 2. Construction details of the 450 MHz pamr 
divider. 



are to be exposed to the weather they must 
be completely sealed- This can best be done 
with silicone rubber, remembering to cover all 
the dielectric material projecting from the 
jacket- If a 4 to 1 balun is to be used, it can 
be made from the same naterial as the 
hardline and likewise carefully sealed. With a 
little imagination, ordinary type "N** plugs 
can be mated to the copper hardline if 
required of your installation. Also, K2KVT 
has developed a simple gamma type feed 
system which uses homemade hardline. The 
extension of the dielectric and center con- 
ductorj into a concentric metal sleeve, form 
the gamma capacitor. Food for thought. 

This feed system is presently in use at my 
QTH with four commercial 8/8 slot-fed 
antennas. The installation is very neat in both 
appearance and performance and should 
remain so for many years to come. Keep in 
mind that the only really unique feature of 
this device is the construction technique. 
There are no expensive *'N^' connectors 
(except for the feedline) and the system is 
completely weatherproof. The homemade 
copper hardline is very low loss and will not 
contaminate nor degrade in performance 
over the years. Remember, a watt saved is a 
watt radiated! 

. , ,WA3AXV 



58 



73 MAGAZINE 



i 




An in depth Uiok by 
(I ay fie Green 

W2NSD/t 




Perhaps I am just too conservative 
for this modern progressive world, but 
my concept of the amateur regula- 
tions is that they should keep step 
with the needs of the hobby — not try 
to guess the future - and not fall too 
far behind. This is why \ have on 
several occasions editorially suggested 
that some sort of yearly or semi- 
yearly convention for considering rule 
changes might be advantageous. 

The recent rules seem to be written 
in an attempt to set up protection 
against some far distant future prob- 
lems that amateur radio might have 
rather than meeting the exingencies of 
the present. Since few people have 
had any success in divining the future, 
I believe we have a right to object to 
Mr. Walker's attempts along this line. 

The recent rules certainly appear to 
have little bearing upon any present 
problems as far as repeaters are con- 
cerned 

Outside ot a need to have the 
regulations catch up with the fact of 
repeaters, little legislation was needed 
to preserve order. Repeater councils 
had taken on the job of smoothing 
out our growth problems and the 
result was probably the least painful 
rapid growth in the history of amateur 
radio. 1 suspect that the main people 
crying for rules v\^re those who were 
able to cooperate the least with our 
repeater councils. They probably 
wanted government rules to force 
others to accept their way of doing 
things rather than their going the v^y 
of the mafority. 

So here we are with repeater 
growth virtually stopped — crossband 
operation illegal — most experimenta- 
tion either illegal or so bound in by 
paperwork that it is not worth pursu* 
log. 

Does anyone agree with me about 
the purpose of the FCC rules and 



changing them only when absolutely 
necessary? 

The Paper Barrier 

The new rules would .seem to 
generate a barrier of paperwork fo 

the repeater group or even control 
operator who is anxious to abide by 
the book. For instance, as I read the 
rules, every time I want to change the 
location of my repeater I most file 
first with the FCC and await their 
authorization. It is not yet known 
whether this will require the usual S4 
modification fee, but I expect it wilL 
As the rules are written I would 
expect that even moving my repeater 
to another building a few feet away 
from its present location would re- 
quire this application and fee and wait 
for Washington to act 

The 73 Radio Club repeater may be 
different from many others, but one 
fact of life for us is changing antennas* 
We try one for a week or so and then 
another . * * and another ... and 
another. We've had over two dozen 
different antennas on the repeater in 
the last two years that we've kept 
track of. From now on we will have to 
file for a repeater modification for 
every antenna change — with a 
fee? - and await permission to make 
the changel Just moving the antenna a 
few feet higher is another modifica- 
tion — complete with filing, fee and 
wait. 

Now let's say that the final ampli- 
fier goes out and we have to operate 
on reduced povwr. Is that legal? I 
think not! I think we have to file for a 
modified license, with fee, and await 
authorization. In the meanwhile we 
would have to stay off the air. 

Each time a control operator 
moves, a new one is added, or an old 
one deleted, I believe this requires a 
modification of the repeater license, 



with fee, and wait for authorization 
from the Commission. 

Now perhaps you think these li- 
cense applications and changes ere 

simple to apply for. The f;^nt is that 

some 500 repeater applications have 

been processed by the Commission so 
far and the last I heard over 90% of 
them had been rejected. Some day it 
may be relatively simple to apply for 
and get a repeater license — a control 
station license — or an auxiliary link 
license - but that day is not yet with- 
in sight. 

Delays 

And what about the delays. Our 
commercial brethren, who have been 
suffering under this type of paper 
blight for years, tell us that weeks and 
even months can pass before authori- 
zation is received. To get right down 
to the facts of today — vw sent in a 
telegram requesting special temporary 
authority to operate a new repeater 
experimentally for one day. We 
followed this a few days later with a 
phone call and were told that we 
could expect about eight to ten weeks 
delay before getting an answer to our 
telegram. 

You probably know that if you are 
going to become a control operator 
for more than one repeater that you 
must have a separate license for 
each - with, I suspect, a separate li- 
cense fee. 

And suppose you want to have a 
remote base station? This means that 
you must file for a remote control 
station as well as an auxiliary link 
station for your home location plus 
the remotely controlled station license 
and another auxiliary link station li- 
cense for the remote location. You see 
it is illegal to talk over the remote 
control station I You use one station 
to turn the remotely controlled sta- 
tion on and off, and a second station 



JULY 1973 



59 



p* 



for the up link to talk through it. 
Let's see, at S9 each, that comes to 
four extra license fees, S36. And that 
is going up soon, right? 

With each remote control staiion or 
auxiliary link station application you 
have to make a complete showing — 
systems diagram — bands to be 

used — monitoring provisions — power 
justification - measures to protect 
against unauthorized access — 
measures to protect against unautho- 
rized operation — provisions for shut- 
ting the system down in case of 
failure - means of monitoring the 
link - and plenty etc. 

Now do you see why this nightmare 
seems completely insane and why we 
put that logo on the FCC news section 
of the 73 newspages? Talk about Alice 
in Wonderland! 

Some fellows who have pushed Mr. 
Walker say that he has relented on the 
control cfiannel aspect of the above to 
the extent that he might accept a 
system which used just one 450 MHz 
transmitter for both control and 
auxiliary link, providing that different 
frequencies were used for the two 
functions. Got that? Talk about 
wasting channelsj So what is wrong 
with using the link channel for con- 
trol? Only that it is not legaL It is 
preferable that you use two separate 
transmitters. 

Getting back, for 3 moment — at 
our repeater site we have three sepa- 
rate locations around the top of the 
mountain — a building with a 50 foot 
tower -a fire tower — and a small 
ranger shack. All have been used for 
repeater receivers at one time or 
another. We like to try split site and 
see what we can do with that — then 
try everything at one site with anten- 
nas on the top and bottom of the 
tower — then in goes a diplexer for 
awhile. From now on each of these 
changes will require pounds of 
paper - many dollars in fees — and 
eons of waiting- 

We're tried the G,E. Progline gear at 
the repeater - we've tried Motorola 
gear — the Standard repeater — and 
even the Dycomm repeater (that's a 
whole 'nother story ~ and a grim 
one). We've tried small experinrtenta! 
repeaters — repeaters made from two 
transceivers — repeaters on 450 — on 

220 - on 52 and even on 29,68 MHz. 
The prospect of continuing such ex- 
periments in the future is dim in- 
deed - we just don't have the paper- 
work time and the patience to wait 
forever for authorization. I don't 
think we could even hack the license 
fees. 

No Crossband 

When the crossband restriction 
went into effect we decided that 
perhaps we would then have to go the 



remote base route. The fact is that 
after trying out twenty meter side- 
band via a two meter link we were 
agonizing over its loss. How can you 
even begin to. express the fun of 
sitting at the big rig, talking through a 
hand unit instead of a regular mike — 
getting up — walking out into the 
yard — taking a mile hike — all the 
time continuing the 20m contact? Or 
walking out, getting into the car — 
switching over to the car rig — driving 
up to a nearby mountain — getting 
out and taking a nice hike up the 
mountain for exercise, talking all the 
while on 20m? Once you do that for a 
day or two you are hooked! 

So okay — new regs - we can't use 
2m any more for the remote opera^ 
tion. We can use 450 MHz now, right? 
Wrong. It seems that while it is legal 
to remotely control the 20m station 
via 450 MHz, it is not legal to talk 
over it since this would require an 
auxiliary link station and that cannot 
be mobile — only at a fixed land 
location. Damnation! 

And what about our plans to get 

220 MHz repeaters on the air, tied in 

with 2m repeaters at the start to help 

speed the opening of the band? All 

gone out the window— illegal. Not 

many mobile operators will go the 

220 MHz route now. There isn't room 

in most cars for both 2m and 220 MHz 

transceivers — and the investment for 

two makes it worse — plus the greater 

chances of being ripped off. Two 

antennas on the car should be quite a 

hoodlum magnet. 

Please seno a note ot sarcastic 

thanks to Mr. Walker via your senator 
or representative. I may be over- 
reacting, but this looks to me like the 
worst blow to amateur experimenta- 
tion and development in the history 
of the hobby* I don't think I am 
over-reacting. 

Six Control Ops 

Now I hear that Mr. Walker has 
decided that a repeater should really 
have no nxsre than six control opera- 
tors. If any attempt is to be made to 
keep the repeater on 24 hours a day 
this means that each control operator 
will have to handle 28 hours each per 
week. That's okay for some - hard on 
others. And what happens when one 
or two are out of town on business or 
vacation? Then the average per week 
goes up to 42 hours each per week. 
That's a full time lob! 

No reason has ever been given as to 
why Mr, Walker wants repeaters to be 
turned off when there is no control 
operator actively monitoring. This re- 
quirement, if enforced, will require 
most repeaters to shut down during 
much of the night -and probably a 
good deal of the day. This means that 
as a safety or emergency service re- 
peaters are going out the window. 



There is no way to even estimate 
how many lives have been saved be- 
cause repeaters have been thera ready 
to use 24 hours a day. It is a fact that 
lives will be lost because of this 
regulation, if it is enforced. Each time 
such happens I suggest that those 
involved send a letter to Mr, Walker 
with copies to Barry Gold water, 
ARRL, me, and President Nixon and 
explain that a life was lost — a loved 
one is dead - because Mr. Walker has 
insisted on asinine regulations which 
have no possible useful purpose. 

And how many of you have run out 

of gas — had car trouble - or in some 

other way used a repeater late at 
night? The first time you need one 

badly — when some berserk gang of 

teenagers is chasing you down a back 

road and you need help and need it 

right now — and the repeater is off — 

please write about the situation and 

send those copies as above (if you 

survive). 

Phone Bands 

Mr, Waiker's recent emasculation of 
the docket to expand the phone bands 
is another case where the work of 
years by many amateurs has gone 
down the drain — and for no apparent 
reason other than a whtm on the part 
of Mr, Walker 

It was proposed to extend the 20m 
phone band down 50 kHz more. Any 
phone DXer who has been at all active 
in the last few years knows that this 
part of the band is little used and that 
continued lack of use will invite even 
more intruders. In my operations in 
rare spots I have noticed that the 
activity in the 14,150-14,200 kHz 
segment of the band is so low that it is 
difficult to make many DX contacts 
when operating there. As soon as I 
moved above 14,200 the action 
began - and that was not only to the 
U,S,, but to ail other areas of the 
world! 

I realize that our Canadian friends 
would like to have this spot as a 
private preserve and that they will 
oppose U.S. expansion. But 1 think 
they will agree that with sideband 
there is littte reason to have separate 
bands — and that virtually all DXing is 
done in the transceive mode these 
days. Most of the VEs seem to be 
right up there in the U.S. band when 
the DX is coming in anyway. 

The General portion of the band is 
so crowded that it is often almost 
useless to even try to make a contact. 
This has come about mainly, I sus- 
pect, because all of the nets which 
were spread out over the band have 
now been compressed Into half of the 

hand. Nets must permit Generals to 
call in for it is the newer amateur who 

usually is more interested in joining 

thera By the time you have traffic 

nets, missionary nets, medical nets. 



60 



73 MAGAZINE 




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Jesuit nets, YL nets, county hunter 
nets, certificate nets, ad infinitum, 
there is little room for rag chewing. 

The extra 50 kHz could have been 
used as incentive for Extra Class ~ it 
could have been used to aliov^ more 
room for Generals — mostly it should 
have been used. 

A Personal Decision for Me 

During the last two years fVe 
v*/atched with growing horror as the 
FCC has loosed a flood of asinine 
regulations. IVe tried to talk with the 
man responsible for this, Prose 
Walker, but found him to be virtually 
impervious to reason or argun^nt. IVe 
been distre^ed by this since it was my 
concept that Mr Walker was a public 
servant and as such should be working 
in the interests of those whom he 
purportedly is serving: the amateurs 
and the CBers* 

First there was the Eyebank doc- 
ket, 19245, which stressed the impor- 
tance of not handling any traffic 
which could be of pecuniary interest 
to anyone. This was a completely new 
concept. In the past amateurs have 
been able to help reporters get stories 
from disaster areas -call in for a 
South American ham and find out 
what happened to an ordered piece of 
gear— things like that where the 
operator involved had obviously no 
pecuniary interest. But the new regu- 



lations are something else. We've yet 
had no interpretation of them, but as 
written it appears that it could be 
against the law to report an accident 
since this could mean money for the 
wrecker or a doctor or perhaps a 
hospital. 

Then there is the environmental 
protection docket 19555. Some read- 
ers thought I over-reacted on the 

January cover to that. But here is 
what Bob Booth W3PS, the legal 
counsel for the League, had to say 
about it, "The proposed rule, if adop- 
ted and applicable to the amateur 
service, may be the greatest threat to 
the continued existence and growth of 
the amateur radio service in the 
United States since the proposal fol- 
lowing World War I to abolish amateur 
radio entirely/' 

The crowning effort of Mr Walker 
IS the repeater docket 18803. Now, 
while I may have my areas of incom- 
petence, no one can honestly call me 
dumb. Yet, all of the efforts that I 
have expended toward trying to un- 
derstand the new repeater rules have 
brought only frustration and bewilder- 
ment. The more I ask questions, the 
more I seem to find that not even Mr. 
Walker understands what he has 
dreamed up for us. 

To me it is a fact that we had about 
one thousand amateur radio repeaters 
active in this country before 18803 



and they were all living pretty much 
in harmony with each other. Sure, 
there were little problems here and 
there, but for the most part these had 
been or were being solved by regional 
councils of repeater operators. 

Amateur ingenuity was being 
demonstrated to an extent without 
precedence in our history. Tve talked 
from a hand unit in Las Vegas via a 
ham network to a mobile in Los 
Angeles - to another in Phoenix — 
another in San Diego! It worked and 
worked well — and it is now abso^ 
lutely illegal. This does not seem sane 
to me* 

We had more and more groups 
experimenting with emergency sys- 
tems of communications which per- 
mitted repeaters to be connected cross 
band to other repeater systems — to 
low band systems — to the service nets 
on 40 meters. We were starting to try 
out repeaters on ten meters so that we 
could interconnect two meter repeat- 
ers over thousands of miles in case of 
emergency. All this is now illegaL 

To me it is 3 fact that the only 
emergency service which can provide 
short, medium and long range conn- 
munications is amateur radio. It is a 
fact for me that every time there is a 
serious emergency the telephone 
system fails and radio is all that is left* 
Where will we be if the primary 
emergency radio service, amateur 



JULY 1973 



61 



^mM 



radio, has its growth stunted by 
severely restrictive regulations? 

1 know it is not only me asking 
these questions for when I spoke to 
the FM gathering at Dayton I asked 
for a show of hands — first I asked to 
see how many of those present were 
the actual representatives of repeaters, 
not just users, but the fellows who 
have to license them and keep them 
on the air — I saw over 200 hands pop 
up. I then asked how many of those 
present thought that there was any 
way that they could manage to live 
with the present regulations — not one 
hand went up - NOT OME! 

We all know that our country de- 
pends upon us to provide communica- 
tions when we have disasters and we 
know that the worse the disaster, the 
more amateur radio is needed. With 
CD virtually impotent, there is no 
other communications system except 
amateur cadio available for the ulti- 
mate emergency. The repeater regula- 
tions, unless changed, could lose not 
just a few lives now and then when a 
repeater is off the air for lack of a 
control monitor, but could lose 
thousands upon thousands of lives 
because the amateur systems that we 
might have to meet the emergency 
will never be built* 

Some amateurs seem to see a sinis- 
ter plan in this - a plan to kill off 
troublesome amateur radio and get rid 
of it. I don't think so* I think we are 
faced with one problem: Mr. Walker. I 
suspect that he has worked up repeat- 
er regulations to fit the amateur ex- 
perience in his past - for the regula- 
tions make sense if you think of them 
being written for 75 meter phone 
repeaters. Mr, Walker had had virtu- 
ally no contact with two meter FM 
when he wrote those rules. 

The ARRL is as frustrated ^ I am 
about what is happening. They have 
sent McCoy to Washington to try and 
reason with Walker — and he has got- 
ten nowhere. The ARRL answer was 
to issue the sharpest denunciation of 
the FCC in the history of the 
League— and to start the directors 
arbund to the clubs getting the word 
to them about Mr. Walker. I have 
received tapes of some of these talks 
and I would appreciate getting tapes 
of others — my friends, please note, I 
wish that I had the space in 73 to 
reprint these talks verbatim - it might 
shake a few more amateurs into the 
realization that this is not something 
that can be shrugged off and left to 
someone else. 

One director recently said that our 
representatives in the FCC have a 
responsibility to listen to us and have 
no right to ignore us or to retreat in 
petulance when we try to argue 
against new regulations. He was talk- 
ing about Mr. Walker. 



I gather that I have gotten on Mr. 
Walker's not too favorite list — if I 

may be guilty of an understatement 
This is unfortunate, but I could not 
face myself or you if I did other than 
try to bring reason out of the madness 
that has descended upon us. I have 
not been able to achieve any reason. I 
now find that there seems to be a 
reluctance on the part of the FCC to 
provide information on the latest 
twists and turns of divination of the 
entrails of docket 18803. 

Rather than getting repeater licens- 
ing information from the Commis- 
ssion 1 now find that f am getting 
some news from this club - from that 
club— from repeater newsletters — 
talks at conventions! This seems odd 
to me since I have tried to have 73 be 
as up to date on repeater info as 
po^ible and the Commission is well 
aware that they can gel their informa- 
tion to the maximum number of 
amateurs if they provide it to the ham 
magazines — including 73. 

In the past 1 have gone to Washing- 
ton and talked with Mr Walker and 
brought the results of this to the 
repeater groups via FM symposiums, 
the Repeater Bulletin and through the 
pages of 73. This has resulted in me 
becoming a sort of information cen- 
ter — with phone calls at at! tinrtes of 
the day and night, letters by the gross, 
and even long visits from repeater 
operators. 

All this has made it more difficult 
for me to work on 73 Magazine and, 
though some readers have gotten the 
impression that 73 is primarily an FM 
magazine, the fact is that about 20% 
of it is so oriented — and that Is about 
right, considering the number of ama- 
teurs involved with FM today. I really 
should not spend as much time on FM 
problems as I have* 

If the situation were clarifying, I 
might see some end to it. But it 
appears to be getting worse instead of 
better. If there were some way to talk 
reason with Mr. Walker, I might be 
encouraged. Reason in this case not 
being Wayne Green's ideas, but ideas 
agreed upon by most repeater groups. 
The League has the same problem and 
apparently hasn't figured anything to 
do about it either, 

I am as upset as anyone when 1 hear 
about repeater councils deciding that 
if the FCC is going to ignore the needs 
and the pleas of the repeater groups, 
then they are going to ignore the FCC, 
The exampfe of the citizens band is 
brought up constantly and amateurs 
ask why they should have to obey 
stupid rules when the CBers ignore 
virtually all their rules. This is diffi- 
cult to answer* 

It seems a pity that the amateur 
and CB division of the FCC should 
choose to ignore the CB problem 



entirely and spend ail of their time 
dumping on the amateurs. Mr. Walker 
has a serious situation on eleven 
meters and this is his responsibility to 
solve — yet he appears to have come 
up with absolutely nothing to help 
this problem. 

Getting things straight at the FCC 
obviously IS important to more than 
the FMers — witness all of the other 
rules that have been coming out, none 
of which are much better than the 
repeater regulations. Really, before we 
turn to anarchy, we should make a 
determined effort to either break 
through the seemingly impervious wall 
Mr. Walker has built around himself or 
else work diligently to get someone 
else into his job. 

Now I don't know if the ARRL is 
going to get to first base in their effort 
to unseat Mr. Watker. I suspect that 
they would make more headway if 
they concentrated on informing 
Senator Goldwater and the senate 
commitee that runs the FCC of the 
situation than trying to stir up grass 
roots reaction among the member 
clubs as they appear to be doing. 
Again, this would be ideal work for 
that Washington lobby that we don't 
have. I won't belabor that point 
further. 

If I were to drop the reins at 73 and 
just concentrate on solving the Walker 
problem, I probably could manage it. 
I'd see every senator on the FCC 
committee. Td try to get on television 
wherever I could and talk up amateur 
radio and point with anguish at the 
FCC — a posture that might be most 
acceptable to TV stations. I think 1 
would interest a lot more people in 
amateur radio in the process and 1 
think 1 could get Walker out as Chief, 
But the fact is that until quite a few 
more major manufacturers advertise in 
73 and clubs get their members to 
subscribe to the magazine, I have to 

work my usual 90 hour work week 
just to keep our head above the water- 

Of course 1 would enjoy talking up 
the hobby on television — getting to 
conventions for talks — putting on the 
pressure \n Washington - I get a kick 
out of that now. I used to be scared 
silly to get up in front of large groups 
and talk, but now I enjoy it. It's fun 
to get across my ideas — to make 
everyone laugh — to entertain. 1 used 
to freeze up and not be able to think 
of anything to say in front of an 
audience - now I'm a bit tense, but 
my talks are unprepared other than 
for a note or two and I can go on for 
hours at a time - 1 haven't heard any 
complaints* 

ft is growing increasingly obvious to 
me that I must stop spending so much 
time trying to personally do some- 
thing about the FCC in Washington, 
The ARRL has volunteered to get this 



62 



73 MAGAZINE 



done and i probably wouid do best to 
sit back and let them do it and tend to 
73 ' Magazine - make it better— help 
get more advertising — more sub- 
scribers — better articles ~ things like 
that. 

It IS difficult for me not to get 
wrapped up in new ideas. For instance 
there is the Repeater Bulletin. This 
was originafly designed as a communi- 
cations medium for the New England 
repealer groups to help them iron out 
their problems. Now, with but a few 
instances, these problems have been 
solved and we have about 50 repeater 
groups working in wonderful har- 
mony. Obviously there is not a lot 
more need for the Bulletin. 

Unless some important need arises 
for the Repeater Bulletin I think I 
shall spend less time on it — perhaps 
continuing it every other month — 
and work harder on 73. I did consider 
for a while the possibility of making it 
a newsletter for all repeater opera- 
tors — but then I remembered how 
difficult it is now to get information 
from the FCC — or even from repeater 
groups. I'm not sure that a rehash of 
material from repeater group news- 

letters would be of much value — and 
it is expensive enough to publish a 
newsletter so there should be some 
darned good reason before going 
ahead. 

Yes, I know about the reincarna- 
tion of RPT from the bowels of 
Dycomm down in Florida — I've seen 
tfie first issue with my good old 
buddy Rob Waters on the cover — and 
there is an interview with him inside 
where he admits to failing at manu- 
facturing ham gear (remember the 
Waters switches?) — and says he 
thinks that the Class E CB band on 
220 will be a goad thing. 

A good FM magazine could make 
it, I think — but one put out by 
Waters (who Is not overly popular 
vwth many FMers) — Jim Penny of 
Dycomm — and Art Housholder of 
Spectronics would not seem to have 
much of a chance, I remember that 
Will Rogers said that he never met a 
man he didn't like — well \ try to 
follow this ideal no matter how diffi- 
cult the above three make my resolve. 
Seldom in my life have I been put to a 
greater strain. 

Through the Repeater Bulletin I've 
tried to show what format would 
make an FM magazine successful — 
some articles — reports from repeater 
groups — FCC news — and lots of 
opinions and ideas. Any signs that the 
magazine is ''owned*' by one or two 
commercial interests will, I suspect, 
fold it the way this did rpt—. It just 
looked too much as it Dycomm and 
Spectronics were partners in the ven- 
ture to sit right with oth^r companies. 
The new RPT seems to be taking the 



same path, with the only major article attract several million new hams. We 
being about a charger for the Motor- could use them. And the 220 MHz 
ola HT-220 and requiring a Motorola band certainly could accommodate 
charger that fs available only from them. Figuring that they might spend 
Spectronics, to the best of my know only half the amount of money pre- 
'^^9^- sently licensed amateurs do (S400 per 

Speaking of the 200 MHz citizens year average), this would mean sales 
band proposition — one further digres- of about $200 million per year for 
sion should be imperceptible after this each one million hams. This could 
long series of them, so let's air my easily grow to a market of $500 
views on 220 MHz — particularly since million per year 
I have been misquoted and misrep- Few amateurs are interested in the 
resented almost universally on this market dollars involved, of course, but 
subiect. this is the key to getting frequencies. 

It is difficult to speak of citizens The spin off for hams would be a 
band without bringing up the spectre return to growth of the hobby and a 
of the present 11m band and the lot less chance of having further 
chaos present It is all too easy to troubles from men like Mr. Walker* 
equate the mess with the term CB and YouVe noted that he doesn't do 
dismiss the idea perfunctorily. I don't anything to anger the 1,000,000 
think it is fair. Eleven meters is the CBers, just the 100,000 or so active 
way it is, I believe, for two reasons — amateurs, 

bad rules and little enforcement If Thus manufacturers would certain- 
rag chewing and high power were Iv have their small business band, 
permitted on the band I doubt if you though it might end up in an unused 
would have illegal stations, bad television channel, complete with the 
language and all the other miseries. I $500 million per year in sales from 
am not suggesting such, only getting that bonanza - plus another S500 
at the problems. million from the new ham band, 

1 do believe that there is a great Maybe more, 
need for an inexpensive communica- ' had this scheme In mind several 
tions band for small businesses — years ago when I submitted a petition 
something like the original CB con- for using part of the 220 ham band 
cept I believe that there is such a for a hobby class of license — one 
need for this that even if it is not put which would primarily require an 
in the 200 MHz band it will find a exam on operating techniques and 
place in the spectrum. Obviously then regulations rather than code and 
there is a question, do we have any- theory. It seemed like a good way to 
thing beuer to do with 220-222 MHz get fellows started the right way. 
than put in a small business band? I Frankly I think it is very short- 
think we do* sighted of the manufacturers who are 
It would be dishonest to say that I backing the El A plan for putting the 
think that the present amateur popu- CB band on the low end of 220 MHz 
lation will move into tfie 222 MHz rather than my hobby band idea — 
band in sufficient numbers to crowd vvith a separate band for small busi* 
the band. With the recent ruling ness-type CB. 

against cross band operation I feel Every time I pick up a hand unit 
that the development of the 222 MHz and talk through a repeater I get to 
band has been stabbed in the back, thinking that it is almost unfair forme 
Mr. Walker, again. I expect there will to have so much fun when it is 
be some development of the band, but prohibited to all but the handful of 
I think it will be slow and frustrating, people who have passed the tough 
We don't have enough hams licensed ham exam, I climb up my local 
now to even fill up two meters, much mountain, FMH with Waller touch- 
less 222 MHz* tone pad gemounted in hand, and talk 
If we were to start thinking in all over central New England — make 
terms of trying to attract newcomers phone calls in Boston — and I just 
to our hobby — possibly looking to know that this is something that could 
the Japanese system (they have over attract millions of people. Boy, if 
350,000 licensed hams today to our Walker knew how great a feeling it is 
265,000) for ideas - we might take a to do that he might get rid of FM 
band such as 220-225 MHz and open entirely! 

if for a special type of new amateur Now, to backtrack through a few 
license - a band where newcomers digressions, I think HI leave Mr. 

Walker pretty much up to the 
League— and try to stop as much 
extraneous exercises as I can and see 



could meet and telk with amateurs 

and be inculcated with the amateur 
spirit — where they could honestly 



have the fun of being hams and be what I can do to get 73 into every 

encouraged to join clubs and get a active ham mailbox in the country. 

higher grade of license. It's just too much for me lo keep up 

A real beginner's license, similar to with everything, 
the one used in Japan, coufd well , , , W2NSD/1 



JULY 1973 



63 




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an older or inexpensive model. Although 
homebrewers usually include such a filter in 
their original design, the average ham 
probably adds a filter to his present receiver. 
But which one? There have been numerous 
articles and circuits presented in the 
literature over the years. I have had more 
than thirty articles published on this subject 
alone! The object of this article is to present 
some of the best circuits with their test 
results so that hams can select the best CW 
audio fUter for their needs. 

There are several facts that must be 
considered when one rates the value of such 
a filter: 

1, The bandwidth or selectivity of the filter, 
which determines the width and steepness 
of the skirts of the filter passband* 

2,The slope of a keyed wave form after 
passing through the filter. Sharp rise and 
fall times yield clean, crisp signals while a 
slow rise and fall will ring and sound 
distorted, 

3, The insertion loss, or gain of the filter, Le. 
a con^arison of the input signal to the 

output signal, 
4- The cost and size of the components 
comprising the filter- 

5. The power supply requirements, i,e, 
passive vs active filters. 




Horiz -- 20 ms/cm^ BW=160 Hz 



,03- 






i 



,02- 



£ ,015- 



.01- 



006- 



rhrPUT-.gov RMS 




3de 

BW«J60Hz 



8 



O O Q O Q 

o o o o 5 

«D f^ « 01 d 



6 



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FREOUENCY \H Hi 



Fig. 1. Filter characteristics of the passive surplus 
range filter. 



JULY 1973 



65 



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6. The flexibility of the fUter, i.e. fixed 

characteristics or variable selectivity, 

variable frequency or both. 

The surplus range filter has been used by 

amateurs for more than 25 years. It is 

passive, plugs directly into the headphone 

jack, and inexpensive ($2.25). The charac- 

teristics of this filter are ^own in Fig. L 




OUTPUT 
# O 



470 K 



Fig. 2a. Schema tir of the 83 mH toroid filter. 













1 ^' ■■ \ 




1 ^ , jjp. 1 




Vj \ 




^■Oliitllll, iJjJ4l4JjJM4i<i«UiliULlaUiui^ 







.05-1 



.04- 



.03' 



in 

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5 



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.02- 



Horjz - 20 mB/cm, B W=35 Hz 



INPUT « JO VOLT RMS 



-3 de 

BW - 35 Hr 



8 



T" 
O 
O 



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FREQUENCY (N Hi 



Fig, 2b, Characteristics of the passive toroid filter.. 



66 



73 MAGAZINE 




Horiz - 20 ms/cm, BW=142 Hz 



M- 



J^ 



a: 



c 



-5- 



4- 



3 




3 dB 

BW - \A2 Hz 



O 

o 



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FREQUENCY IK Hi 



in^r 



F!g, 3. Characteristics of the 4 section, 
active /liter (Ref. 2J< 



The insertion loss is high and the bandwidth 
fairly broad. The keyed wave form is sharp 
and CW signals sound good through this 
filter. 

Figure 2b shows the filter characteristics 
of a passive filter design that has been 
popular for the past few years V It uses 
inexpensive, surplus 88 mH toroid conduc- 
tors. This filter is very sharp, 35 Hz band- 
width at 3 dB down, and it also has a high 
insertion loss. The keyed wave shape has a 
slow rise and faU so CW signals have a 
pronounced ringing- 
Figure 3 shows the characteristics of a 4 
section, twin-T, active filter^. This filter has 
been designed to provide a reasonably nar- 
row bandwidth and a clean keyed signal. 

JULY 1973 



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touchtone, plus a special section on 
a "mini" repeater control system. 
224 pages. 

Hardcover $7.00 Paperback $5.00 



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Enclosed is $ . Please send — Dhard- 

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t 

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INPUT 27 K 
O 'SAAf 



OUTPUT 
O 




Fig. 4a, Schematic of the variahle Q active tilter. 




Horiz - 2Qms/cm, BW-75 Hz 



13-| 
.5- 



en 






4- 



.2- 

J- 






3 4B 

ew - 75 Hi 



R - zoo 



J«iQ";.Q2^ jtta. 



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o 



T 

o 

o 
in 



O 8 C 

p ^ ffi 



r- 1 f T 

O Q 

tfi 5 



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FREQUENCY IN Hi 



Fig. 4b. Response of the variable Q filter. 



73 MAGAZINE 



This filter provides signal gain and is fixed in 
frequency and selectivity. The design is 
fairly complex, requiring 9 transistors, 15 
capacitors, and 30 resistors. CW signals 
sound good through this filter. 

Figure 4b shows the filter characteristics 
of an active filter of fixed frequency but 




OUTPUT 

— o 



/ 

FREQUENCY 



Fig. 5a. Schematic of the variable Q/frequency 
active filter. 




Horiz — 20 ms/cm, BW-18Hz 




variable Q , The keyed wave form is a slow 
rising and failing wave forin^ but its slope is 
good considering the narrow (75 Hz at 3 dB) 
bandwidth. The cost of the filter is low since 
741 operational ampUfiers are available for 
approximately 35^, 

Figure 5 represents a single active filter 
that has variable selectivity and variable 
frequency. The bandwidth can be made 
extremely sharp, less than 9 Hz, or very 
broad, greater than 300 Hz, The keyed wave 




1.44 

IJ 

aft 

s 

a: J- 
7 

3 6 

.2 
J 



ol 



Horiz - 20 ms/cm, BW=242 Hz 



2,5 V 



4 



R-5,4 K 

ew>9Hz 




R ■ 5.9 K 

BW-Se Hz 



R-7.2 K 
ew> 242 Hi 



100 



200 
FREQUENCY IN Hi 



300 



400 



Horiz — 20 ms/cm, BW= 56 Hz 



Fig. 5b- Responses of the variable Q/frequency 
filter at different bandwidths. 



JULY 1973 



69 




2.2 K 



INPUT O 




O OUTPUT 



2.2 K 



Fig, 6a. Schematic of the two stage active filter with a threshold detector between stages. 




;20 

3 

§ '^ 

2 J2' 

Q. 

g .08 
tit 

^ 06 ^ 

04 
-02i 





Horiz - 20 ms/cw, BW^16 Hz 



INPUT • .2 V RMS 



II 



3 dB 

eW«l6H£ 



J 



o 

O 



a 



o 
o 



o 
o 

0) 



8 



FREQUENCY IN Hi 



Fig. 6b. Response of filter with threshoid detector. 

forms are particularly sharp ^ considering the 
narrow band widths. The overshoot at a 
bandwidth of 56 Hz should not be objec- 



tionable. The gain of this filter is strongly 
dependent upon the Q setting, requiring the 
operator to adjust gain, unless the filter is 
followed by an audio stage with automatic 
gain control. 

The data shown in Fig, 6b is for a two 
stage active filter with a diode threshold 
detector between stages,^ The diodes prevent 
low signals (such as QRN) from passing 
through until the CW signal of the desired 
frequency is present, which provides quiet 
tuning between signals. The bandwidth of 
this filter is sharp (16 Hz) and the keyed 
wave form is good for this extreme band- 
width • Signals through this filter do ring 
somewhat and an interchange of capacitors 
to obtain a slight mismatch and broaden the 
bandwidth would help. The gain of this filter 
is near unity, and the frequency and Q are 
fixed. 

r hope this discussion will help in the 
selection of the most suitable filter for your 
application, 

. , .W6AGX 

References 
L McCoy, UG,, **The Selectoroid, A Simple High 
Performance Audio Filter" QST, Dec, 1966. 

2, The Radio Amateur^s Handbook, 1971 edition, 
"An Active Filter," pp. 1 3 1 - 1 32. 

3, Russell, H-T,, ''ShijJile Amplifier Active Filters 
Give Stable Q;' EDN/EEE hm. 1, 1972. 

4. Artusy^ M., "Tuneable Active Filter Has Con- 
trollable High Q" Etectronias, Jan, 31 , 1972. 

5. Andes, C.B., "Threshold Detectors In A CW 
Audio Filter " QST, Dec, 1971. 



70 



73 MAGAZINE 



George R Ledoax K1TKJ/WA2SUR 
P,0. Box 57 

B^tam CT 06750 





\ ppi> .3 '. . -n \ 



f I « _ 



s ■ *» 



* ' r. 



U.S. Patient Office 



• [11 



# - 4 

1 



Concerning: A S>stein To Achieve-^ 





vv 

i 



85 dB Gain On A 2M Antenna | 




Archer (A) shoots arrow into buUseye of target «B;. pushing plunger 
(C) ajid releasing noose from latch (D). Weight (E) drops onto south 
end of see-saw IF), catapulting designated hitter (G) from the north 
end. Bean-proof hard hat hits bottom of bass drum (H)* wakmg 
sleeping dachshund (1) who jumps up raising door on cage (J) 
containing overweight squirrel Squirrel, following the veterinary's 
orders, jogs eagerly up the ramp into exercise wheel (K), turning 
pulley and gears (L). This rotates cooling fan (M) — a valuable side 
effect in summer months but annoying in the winter - * and turns 
worm gear (N>. stirring up a whole can of worms (O), Partridge (P) 
lunges at rising worms, pulling pin and releasing hot air balloon (Q). 
which raises antenna gain to a cool 85 dB (see M) 



.| 

R 
R 

0] 

f * 4 

I: 

* 

IT* 4 

w 

f 

i * i 

& 

M 



M^sim 



Fantastic Breakthrough! 



The following article describes how to 
make a mobile two meter antenna with 
a measured gain of 85 dB! Yes, that's rights 
eighty-five dB gain. 

This antenna results from my need for a 
high gain mobile antenna to go with a not 
too sensitive mobile rig. After much experi- 
mentation, machine shop work, and exhaus- 
tive lab testing, the following antenna 
emerged. 

Construction should take only one even- 
ing and the parts should not be difficult to 



get. The instructions should be followed 
closely if optimum results are to be 
achieved. 

The base of the antenna is an SO-239 
connector. To this, four 50.80 cm copper 
radials are soldered into the holes provided 
in the S0239, Care should be taken to see 
that a good ground connection is made to 
the body of the connector. Now the main 
radiator can be fabricated out of the same 
material (#10 wire does nicely), the length 
of the radiator being 46.99 cm. The element 



JULY 1973 



71 



■m 



should be soldered securely to the center pin 
of the SO-239 and be perpendicular to the 
radials. 

SWR measurements can be made and the 
SWR adjusted by changing the angle of the 
radials to the body of the SO-239 and 
trimming the main radiator if necessary. The 
antenna was fabricated and taped to a 
wooden stick attached to my car in order to 
make the following gain measurements. 

The output of my Hewlett Packard model 
6 08 A signal generator was connected to an 
antenna and a signal level set into the mobile 
receiver. The gain antenna was connected to 
the mobile at this time. The gain antenna 
was removed and a lab quality 50n load 
installed in its place. The signal generator 
output was raised to achieve the same signal 
level as before. The signal level out of the 
generator had to be raised 85 dB to get the 
same reference level in the mobile now with 
the 50O load connected. This proved that 
the gain antenna has a 85 dB gain over the 
5012 load. What? You thought that it was 
gain over a dipole, or was it over a quarter 
wave whip, or was it over an isotropic 

radiator, or was it over . . - ? 

All too often this is the case. Gain figures 

are bandied about without telling what they 
refer to. Think of the term "dB gain" as 
meaning "more gain THAN." More gain than 
what? Do they tell you? Is this '^system 
gain?" Is this power gain or voltage gain? 
These questions should be asked when you 
are told "This antenna has dB gain." 

Dr, John D, Kraus in his Book, *'Anten- 
nas," McGraw Hill, 1950, says, "Gain is 
always measured with respect to some re- 
ference antenna. Since an isotropic source is 
a hypothetical standard, it is common prac- 
tice to make actual gain measurement with 
respect to a 1/2 wave reference antenna." 

Unfortunately this is not always the case, 
especially in the ham antenna field. Some 
manufacturers rate their antennas over an 
isotropic source, while others rate them over 
a ground plane and others may even rate 
theirs over a 5012 load! There is no agreed 
upon standards 

Let's look at the various standards and 
compare them to one anolher. 

An isotropic source is often used as it 
gives the highest gain figures, i.e., a 1/2 wave 



dipole has a 2.15 dB gain over an isotropic 
source (this is not the reason that all 
manufacturers use isotropic source as a 
standard, but the reason that some do). For 
all practical purposes, let's say that an 
isotropic source has the lowest gain figures, 
highest numbers, of any antenna standard 
that radiates efficiently. An isotropic source 
exists only in theory. It is a point source, 
infinitely small, that radiates equally well in 
all directions of all planes. Think of the sun 
as an isotropic source radiating light in all 
directions throughout space. 

A dipole, on the other hand, has directivi- 
ty - therefore gain. If you put the same 
amount of power into a 1/2 wave dipole and 
all of it radiates, and you put the same 
amount of power into an isotropic source 
and all of it radiates, you will get more signal 
broadside off the dipole than from the 
isotropic source. You will get less signal 
from the ends of the dipole than from the 
isotropic source. A dipole has 2 J 5 dB gain 
over an isotropic source. 2J5 dB is equal to 
increasing the power L64 times. Another 
way to say this is an isotropic source with 
164W will be equally as strong as a 1/2 wave 
dipole with lOOW in the dipole's best direc- 
tion. Of course, the same dipole will be 
much weaker than the isotropic source off 

the ends of the dipole. 

A quarter wave whip is sometimes used as 
a standard. There is no exact measurement 
of the gain of a quarter wave whip. It 
depends on the size of the ground plane and 
the height above ground. The Electronic 
Industries Association Subcommittee has 
agreed that a quarter wave whip mounted on 
a ground plane 137 cm square and 152 cm 
bff the ground, operated in the 150 MHz 
band has +1^2 dB gain over a 1/2 wave 
dipole. Related to an isotropic source this is 
+,65 dB gain. 

Some manufacturers, in order to play the 

numbers game, speak of voltage gain at the 
receiver- A receiver connected to a 1/2 wave 
dipole will have a voltage gain of 4.3 dB over 
one connected to the imaginary isotropic 
source (2,15 dB X 2 = 4.3 dB voltage gain). 
Voltage gain as expressed in dB is twice that 
of power gain in dB, For example, to double 
the power is to increase it 3 dB. To double 
the voltage is to increase it 6 dB, To increase 



72 



73 MAGAZINE 



the power ten times is 10 dB. To increase 
the voltage ten times is 20 dB, Voltage gain 
can be used if a manufacturer wants to show 
large **dB numbers," 

Another popular numbers game is to talk 
of **system gain/' Add the dB gain of the 
two antennas together, one on each end of 
the circuit, and a dipole now has a system 
power gain of 4,3 dB over an isotropic 
source. It has 8.6 dB gain if we start talking 
of system voltage gain. Remember that this 
8.6 dB gain is the gdn of a dipolel Just think 
of the numbers that we could come up with 
for, say, a yagi. 

One popular 5/8 wave antenna on the 
market claims 3 J dB gain (3.65 dB rounded 
off) over an isotropic soiwce. This comes to 
L5 dB over a 1/2 wave dipole, and you will 
only realize that if you mount the antenna 
1/2 wave above a ground plane. The 1/2 
wave support pipe acts as part of the 
antenna to give that additional 1.5 dB gain. 
If you don*t mount it on a meter- long pipe 
on your car (and who does) it's only a 1/2 
wave dipole with dB gain over a 1/2 wave 
dipole. This acts much like the coaxial 
antenna where the whip portion is one half 
of the antenna and the 1 /4 wavelength sleeve 
is the other half. A coaxial antenna has a 
gain approaching that of the 1/2 wave dipole 
it electrically resembles. 

These large differences in gain measure- 
ment are one of the reasons the FCC has 
required amateurs under the new repeater 
rules to know what gain their anteimas 
actually produce. 

As a rule of thumb, a given anterma will 
give equal gain as an antenna of similar size 
if both are of good design. Don't be misled 
by SWR as a measure of antenna efficiency. 
Remember that a 5012 load loads wefl and 
has an excellent SWR, but does not radiate 
well. The gain of an antenna is directly 
related to its size. You will not get 16 dB 
gain from a four foot vertical two meter 
antenna unless its gain is related to a piece 
of wet string. Beware of small antennas that 
have big gain figures. 

So the next time one of your friends, or 
even an enemy, tells you that his Super Wave 
Grabber has 14 dB gain, ask him, "14 dB 

over what?" 

..,K1TKJ 




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JULY 1973 



73 





GREGORY ELECTRONICS CORP 

The FM Used Equipment People. 

243 Route 46, Saddle Brook, N. J. 

Phone (201)489-9000 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 

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MA/E33 



74 



73 MAGAZINE 



,1- 



John J. Schultz W2EEY 
1829 Cornelia Street 
Brooklyn NY 11227 



COMPROMISE 

MULTIBAND 

ANTENNAS 



Ideas on antennos to use for the ^'impossible QTH'^ 



Many amateurs, even when living in 
private houses, encounter very diffi- 
cult antenna installation situations. For in- 
stance, supposing one has available only a 
single elevated point to which an antenna 
can be attached, one desires multiband 
operation, there is no direct ground connec- 
tion available at this point and one desires a 
reasonably small and inexpensive antenna 
structure. 

It is assumed that one has fried a random 
length wire or other antenna form near the 
ground and found it unsatisfactory for 
reasons of performance or because of TVI or 
BCI problems. There have been many an- 
tenna forms developed to satisfy the above 
difficult installation conditions and their 
designs have ranged all the way from high 
quahty trap or loaded designs (corres- 
pondingly expensive) to fanciful "magic" 
designs where full details of construction are 
not made pubhc. 

This article does not describe any 
"magic" type of anteima but rather tries to 
go through a brief analysis of the various 
antennas that one might consider for use 
under the conditions stated and which can 



be simply home built and provide reasonable 
performance. The form of antenna finally 
arrived at is a triangular loop with some 
special matching baluns. However, that is 
getting somewhat ahead of the story and one 
should first become acquainted with some of 
the considerations involved with other an* 
tenna forms under the installation condi- 
tions that are postulated. 

Remembering the installation conditions 
and assuming that trap or loaded designs are 
not considered because of their construe- 
tional difficulty, tuning requiiements, etc, 
the first antenna form one might consider is 
a short dipole. 

Short Dipole 

By a short dipole is meant one that is less 
than a ViK long. For instance one might have 
a ViX long dipole on 10 or 15 meters and 
then consider operating it on the lower 
frequency bands where it becomes a ¥4 or 
even 1/8X long dipole. Naturally, the feed 
point impedance of the dipole on the lower 
bands will no longer match the coaxial 
feedhne to the dipole and a definite swr will 
exist on the line. Perhaps one question that 



JULY 1973 



75 



■M* 



should be explored immediately, since some 
compromises are going to be necessary in the 
antenna design used, is the effect of swr on 
the line and how much swr can be tolerated. 
If the antenna/feedhne ^stem is a balanced 
one where a balun is used to go from a 
balanced antenna form to an unbalanced 
coaxial transmission line, the line is run for a 
reasonable distance at right angles to the 
antenna plane, etc.; the power reflected back 
from the antenna which it won't accept 
because of the feedline /antenna impedance 
mismatch wiU be dissipated mainly as a heat 
loss. This heat loss wiU occur in the line and 
in the matching network used between the 
transmitter and the line. Only a small 
amount of loss will occur because of radia- 
tion from the line* 

So swr on the line need not necessarily be 
a cause for worry regarding TVI and BCI 
generated by excessive line radiation. The 
main compromise that one has to accept is 
regarding how much transmitter output 
power it can be tolerated to have lost via 
heat loss. The exact loss accumulated with 
any given type of transmission line and 
under any given swr condition can be found 
in antenna manuals. Figure 1 gives a brief 
summary of the losses that can occur under 
some typical conditions. For instance^ if one 

used 30m of RG 58/U cable and the line 
had a 10:1 swr, the total loss would be 6.5 
dB. In other words, sUghtly less than 25% of 
the transmitter power would be accepted by 
the antenna for radiation. If RG 8 were 
used, the total loss would be 2,8 dB or 
slightly over half the transmitter output 
power woi^d be accepted by the antenna- 
The advantage of larger, low loss cable ^ if 
one can afford it, is apparent when dealing 
with a line having a high swr. For instance, if 
a 30m RG8/U line has a 5:1 swr, its total 
loss is only 1.7 dB which means that about 
2/3 of the transmitter output power still 
reaches the antenna. This loss may be quite 



Loss for 30m of 


Additional loss 


Additional loss 


cable at 20 MHz 


for 10:1 swr 


for 5:1 swr 


RG 58/U 2.5 dB 


4 


2 


RG 59/U 1 .5 


3 


1.5 


RG 8/U 0.8 


2 


0.9 



Fig, J, Transmission Une losses alone and addi- 
tional loss for swr 's of 10:1 and 5: 1 . 



acceptable if it means that one can operate 
on several bands with a compromise anten- 
na. 

To return to the short dipole, one can 
find the input impedance of such an antenna 
described in great detail for various lengths 
of dipoles in many engineering texts. When 
the dipole is a V2X long, its impedance is 
between 50 and TOH, depending upon 
height above ground and the size of the 
tubing used (a dipole constructed of tubing 
and supported in the middle is assumed). 
When the same dipole is used on a lower 
frequency band, where its total length be- 
comes %\ the input impedance rises to 
about soon. Used on a still lower band, 
where the total length is I/8X, the im- 
pedance becomes about ISOOfl. These input 
impedances are also highly reactive. Ob- 
viously the direct cormection of a coaxial 
line to such an antenna would produce 
excessive swr*s if the antenna were operated 
on some band where its total length was less 
than ViX, One idea that might be explored is 
the use of a reverse type of K4 balun. That 
is, step down the impedance by a factor of 4 
on each band including the band on which 
the dipole is ViX long. Theoretically, this 

should produce an swr of from 4 to 5:1 on 
each band, but in practice it is doubtful if 
any balun will function properly with the 
highly reactive impedance present- Also, the 
performance on the band where the dipole is 
14X long is compromised. The short dipole, 
as such, constructed from tubing, would 
appear to be a poor solution to the com- 
promise antenna problem. The only excep- 
tion would be if the dipole could be con- 
structed sufficiently Large from sheet metal 
or tubing to form a broad-band bow-tie type 
dipole. However, this would require con- 
siderable mechanical effort. 

Short Vertical Antenna 

The short vertical antenna deserves brief 
mention because it has frequently* been 
accepted as a compromise multi-band an- 
tenna for military applications. But usually a 
good ground system has been available, and 
under such a condition the use of such an 
antenna is feasible. A good example is 
shipboard usage with steel-hulled vessels. 
Some amateurs may have come across sur- 



76 



73 MAGAZINE 



a 



d 



SUFFICIENT TURNS 
TO RESONATE ON 
DESIRED BAND 



a 



a 



n 



Cl 



KJ 



\J 



r~ m3-6 ferrite rods 

^^ INCHED TOGETHER 



] 



T 



^Wf 



500 



500 



COAXUNE 



Fig. 2, Ferrite loop antenna for single band 
operation. 

plus AN/BRA-6 tuners which belonged to a 
standby HF antenna system, A vertical 
antenna (unloaded) of some 5 -7m in length 
was connected directly to a coaxial cable, 
when possible of up to RG I7/U size, and 
the tuner used at the end of the coaxial 
cable run next to the shipboard transmitter. 
Such a system was feasible since if one looks 
at the base impedance of a vertical antenna 
it will be found to vary from about 30S2 
when the antenna is V4X at the operating 
frequency, to 1012 when the antenna is 3/8X 
long, to somewhat less than 512 when the 
antenna was 1/16X long. So, even as a short 
vertical, the anteima did not produce swr's 
of much more than 10:1 on the transmission 
line. The overall result was that with an 
inherently low-loss transmission line, a good 
portion of the transmitter power was ac- 
cepted by the vertical radiator which in 
itself, since no base tuning or loading was 

involved, could be temporarily clamped to 
any elevated portion of the ship's structure. 
If one does indeed have a very good 
ground system that is large enough to be 
effective (^^X or longer) even on the lo^er 
frequency bands, a remotely tuned, non-base 
loaded vertical is a good compromise anten- 
na to consider. A tin sheeted roof, for 
instance, miglit provide such a ground. How- 
ever, if one does not have an adequate 
ground^ the vertical with short radials will 
not work any better than a short dipoie. The 
only type of vertical that might be satisfac- 
tory without a ground system is one ViX 
long. Such an antenna is not physically 
feasible normally on the lower frequency 
bands. 



Loop Antennas 

A loop antenna is not normally thought 
of being much of a transmitting antenna, 
except in its larger forms when it is the size 
of a Quad element. Some designs using small 
loops for the frequency of operation in- 
volved have been developed for military 
purposes where a high angle of radiation was 
desired and the loop used as a field antenna 
located close to the ground. In this case, the 
loop was resonated for each particular 
operating frequency using a tuning network 
located at the base of the loop. Some twenty 
odd years ago some amateurs experimented 
with extremely small loops (on the order of 
60 cm diameter) for apartment type usage as 

transmitting antenna. Such experimentation 
continues even today. Several European 
amateur magazines have described ferrite 
stick loop antennas, such as shown in Fig. 2, 
for use as transmitting loops for difficult 
antenna locations. Such loops are tuned for 
operation on one band only, although of 
course they can be bandswitched once the 
constants for each band have been found by 
experimentation. The capacitor divider net- 
work shown on the loop in Fig. 2 is used to 
resonate the loop on the operating fre- 
quency for maximum output while at the 
same time using the variable capacitance 
divider to match the impedance of the 
coaxial feedline for a 1 : 1 swr. 

IOOOt 



100- 



30- 



10 



3 



I- 



0.3- 



0,1 * 



+ 



.2 A ,6 .8 1.0 

CIRCUMFERENCE OF LOOP IN A 



-H 

1.2 



Fig. 3, Radiation resistance of a loop as a function 

of its size. 



JULY 1973 



77 



wm 




INICAL AID GROU 




The Technical Aid Group is a group 
of hams who have indicated a willing- 
ness to share their knowledge and 
skills with others. They have volun- 
teered to be of service to fellow hams 
and do so without compensation, if 
you have a technical question, look 
over the list to see who has competen- 
cy in the area of your question. For 
many of the TAG members, descrip- 
tions of all areas of expertise would be 
lengthy, so an abbreviated description 
is given. When stating your problem, 
give as much information as possible 
and clearly state the difficulty. En- 
close a SASE for reply. 

For those hams who have a desire 
to share, the TAG is the thing for you. 
Send a brief note requesting the mem- 
bership form, nil it in and send it 
back. It asks a few questions about 
your qualifications, and there is a 
check-list to indicate your fields of 
competence. These cover ^11 modes 
currently used by hams, antenna de- 
sign and theory, transmitter and re- 
ceiver design for HF, VHF, and UHF, 
logic, ICs, general help, and other 
areas. As more members are added, 
their names and addresses will be 
published. 

Robert Perlman WB2VRW, 3 
Josten Place, Hudson NY 12534, Elec- 
trical engineering student. WiU help 
with Novice transmitters and receiv- 
ers, and any help for beginning hams, 

Thomas Laffm WJFJE. Box 133, 
Hillsboro NH 03244. Radio communi- 
cations technician. Special aid to ex- 
CBers and those who need terms in 
easily understood terms; aid to Nov* 
ices and Techs interested in MARS, 
RACES, CD. and CAP; how to buiJd 
and scrounge parts; assistance on ham 
history, ATV, microwave, and general 
help. 

Theodore Cohen W4UMF. 8603 
Conovcr PL. Alexandria VA 2230K 
Geophysicist. Specially prepared to 
answer questions about SSTV and 
ATV. 

/ Bradley FUppin K6HPR. 116 
Montecito Ave., Apt. M,, Monterey 
CA 93940. Electronic engineer. Help 
with RTTY, data processing and pro- 
gramming, general. 

Ira Kavaler WA2ZIR, P.O. Box 54, 
Flatbush Sta., BrookJyn NY 11226. 
Electrical engineer. Assistance offered 
in theoretical aspects of electricity 
and electronics from dc to UHF, 



design of equipment, computer pro- 
gramming, and signal circuit (failsafe) 
design, 

John Tekh WB2JAE/6 Ruddock, 
Cal Tech. Pasadena CA 9 11 09. Novice 
and rig problems, solid slate and logic 
circuitry, 

David Fell WB6ALF. P.O. Box 26 1 , 
Sierra Madre CA 91024, Electronics 
engineer. Qualified help in logic, digi- 
tal and analog design, solid state, AM 
and TV. 

Robert Groh WA2CKY, 65 Rox* 
borough Rd., Rochester NY 14619. 
Communications engineer. Bob can 
lend a hand in HF and VHF transmit- 
ter and receiver design as well as 
solid-state logic and digital techniques, 

Carl Miller WA6ZHT. 334 Paragon 
Ave., Stockton CA 95207. Computer 
technician, Carl's specialty area is 
solid-state QRP, 

George Daughters WB6AIG. 1560 
Klamath Dr,. Sunnyvale CA 94087. 
Research associate. HF transmitter 
and receiver, SSB, and solid state, are 
George's fields. 

D. Hausnmn VE3BUE. 267 North- 
crest PI , Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. 
Student. Novice transmitter and re- 
ceiver problems as well as logic, digital 
techniques and ICs. 

Hugh Wells W6WTU, 1411 18th St „ 
Manhattan Beach CA 90226. Elec- 
tronics instructor. Hugh can help with 
AM. Novice problems, VHF-UHF re- 
ceivers and converters, solid state, test 
equipment, FM and repeaters, and 
general help. 

Charles Hill WA 7LQ0, 4005 Camp- 
bell St.. Baker OR 97814, Student 
TV, Novice transmitter problems, and 
logic. 

John Perhay WA0DGU\ Route 4, 
Owalonna MN 55060. EE technician. 
John Will help with RTTY, AM, SSB, 
Novice gear, HF transmitters and re- 
ceivers, solid state, \Cs^ and test equip- 
ment. 

Ron Tfuums WSQYR/6. 1928 S. 
Beverly Glen Blvd,. Apt. 1 2, Los 
Angeles CA 90025, teK 556-2721. 
Commercial communications experi- 
ence. Ron is willing to assist with 
beginners' problems, theory and regu- 
lations. 

Jim Jindrick WA9QYC 801 
Florence Ave., Racine Wl 53402. Con- 
sulting engineer. General help as well 
as HF, VHF, and UHF antennas, 
transmitters, and receivers. 



William Welsh W6DDB, 2814 Em- 
pire Ave., Burbank CA 91504, Elec- 
trcnic engineer, Beginner*s problems, 
code instruction, theory and regula- 
tions. 

Ken Knechi WJGYF. Box 39, 
Clfntondale NY 1 25 1 5, Televsion 
engineer. TV video, logic, and digital 
techniques, 

Tom OHara W60RG. 10253 E. 
Nadine St,, Temple City CA 91780. 
Communications engineer. RTTY, 
TV. AM, SSB, VHF antennas, trans- 
mitters and receivers for HF through 
UHF, solid state, and general help, 

Bruce Creighton WA5JVL 2517 
Metairie Ct., Metairie LA 70002. Elec- 
trical engineer Antennas, Novice 
problems, solid state, logic, digital 
techniques, test equipment, and gen- 
eral help. 

Tom Borok WB2PFY 215-33 23 
Rd., Bayside NY 11360. Student. 
Tom is especially quahfied to help 
Novices with their problems with 
transmitters and receivers, HF and 
VHF antennas, HF receivers, test 
equipment, and surplus. Morse code 
instruction* 

Roger Taylor K9ALD, 2811 
William St., Champaign IL 61820. 
Engineer. Roger is adept with_AM, 
SSB, antennas, solid state, logic and 
digital techniques, ICs, test equip- 
ment, and other general help. 

Orris Grefsheim WA6UYD, 1427 
W. Park St., Lodi CA 95240. TV 
technician. Orris is capable of assisting 
in all fields of amateur work, DC 
through UHF, logic as well as Novice 
help. 

John Allen KIFWF, 1 12 Edgemoor 
Lane, Ithaca NY 14850. Technical 
director. John's areas of assistance are 
VHF and UHF antennas, receivers, 
and transmitters, solid state and digi- 
tal techniqufs. ICs, and SSB. 

Eugene Fleming W0HMK. 1 327 
Prairie Rd., Colorado Springs CO 
80W9. Radio and television repair 
experience* Eugene \^ill be glad to 
help with HF transmitterb, receivers 
and test equipment. In ^iddrlion to 
letters, he will accept open reel tape 
and braille correspondence. 

Roger A. liaim WB^/WP, 2753 W. 
Coyle, Chicago IL 60645. Electrical 
engineer. Roger conducts Novice and 
General Class code and theory courses 
and will be happy to assist those 
seeking licenses. 



78 



73 MAGAZINE 




WIRE OR TUBING 



TUSING 



TO BALUN 




.^WOOCEN CENTER SUPPORT 
^TUBING OR WIRE 



TO BALUN 



TUBING 



Fig, 4, The forms of triangular loops which lend 
themselves to single point support at the base. 



Such miniature loops work to a degree 
but no one will deny that they are extremely 
inefficient. If, however, one starts to investi- 
gate the loop possibilities somewhere be- 
tween those of the quad size loop and a 
miniature loop, some interesting results oc- 
cur. For instance, Fig. 3 is a plot of Ihe 
impedance of a loop as a function of its 
circumference in wavelengths. The im- 
pedance for a loop less than a wavelength in 
circumference is approximately equal to: 
1 97 X (Circumference in X)^ 

The impedance fails off very rapidly as 

the size of the loop becomes small in terms 

of wavelengths. But, nonetheless, the values 

themselves do remain within manageable 

limits if the loop is not made extremely 

small. 

There are many designs that one can 

develop from the loop antenna idea if one 
studies the chart and some of the impedance 
matching transformers described later. For 
inscance, a '*loop" using the forms of Fig. 
4(A) or (B) and having a total circumference 
of from 9 to 12m are quite feasible using a 
combination of aluminum tubing and heavy 
wire construction. Such a loop on 1 5 meters 
will have a circumference of about a .75 
wavelength and hence an impedance of 
about 40n. On 20 meters it is about .5X 
with an impedance of 1212, On 40 meters 



the circumference is ,2SX with an impedance 
of about 1 2£2. 

Feeding such a loop with a coaxial line 
directly (but through a balun for symmetry) 
would not produce an intolerable swr on 15 
or 20 meters but there would hardly be too 
much hope of any performance on 40 
meters. Since a balun has to be used anyway, 
it would be better to raise the impedance of 
the loop by a fixed factor to provide a 
somewhat better match on 40 meters. For 

m 

instance, if aU impedance levels were raised 
by a factor of four, the 15 meter impedance 
would be 160J2, the 20 meter impedance 
480 and the 40 meter impedance 4— Sfi, 
The 15 meter swr still remains tolerable, the 
20 meter matching has been considerably 
improved, and at least there is a better 
chance of getting some power into the 
antenna on 40 meters. 

The method to accomplish these im- 
pedance changes is a little bit different than 
the usual 4:1 balun which goes from say 
soil unbalanced to 200O balanced. Here we 
would like to raise the balanced (antenna) 
impedance while going from a balanced to 
unbalanced condition. This can be done by 
using either one or two standard toroid 
balun kits but wound as shown in Fig. 5* 
What is done is that the balanced load 
(antenna) is first transformed to an un- 
balanced load by one toroid winding. Then a 
4 times unbalanced to unbalanced step-up 



COAX 
LINE 



^ 



lAA^H^^B^ 



iy-yv-Y^^ 




ANT 



BALANCED 

TO 

UNBALANCED 

hi 



UNBALANCED 

TO 
UNBALANCED 

1-4 STEPUP 




Fig, 5. Tivo baluns are required. Each can be 
wound on half of a toroid or on two separate 
toroids. 



JULY 1973 



79 



torn id winding is used to go into the coaxial 
line. The two windings may be placed on 
one toroid core by having each winding 
occupy half of the core or separate cores 
may be used* 

The low base impedance of this type of 
antenna allows construction to be simplified 
since the base insulator need not be a good 
RF insulating material. For instance, if the 
antenna form of Fig, 4(A) is constructed by 
having each of the V arms being a length of 
TV mast or other tubing, the base plate 
where they come together can be a hard 
wooden board to which they are bolted. 

Theoretically the efficiency of such a 
loop antenna, except for the line losses, can 
be quite high since it is dependent on the 
ratio of the ohmic losses of the antenna 
structure to the impedance on each band. 

If the antenna structure is constructed 
carefully such that the ohmic loss is a small 
fraction of an ohm, one can even expect that 
on 40 meters most of the power accepted by 
the antenna will be radiated- In practice, of 
course, the theoretical efficiency is never 
achieved for a number of reasons. The 
baluns do not function exactly as desired 
with low impedance loads, the bonding 
between anteima sections will invariably 
introduce some ohmic loss, etc. Nonetheless, 
the antenna will radiate and definitely get 
some signal coupled into space from hope- 
fully an elevated position from which it can 
do some good. 

As was mentioned before, one can de- 
termine various other small loop designs, 
depending upon the space available to con- 
struct the loop and the bands on which one 
wants to operate. 
Transmission Line Tuner 

A tuner is invariably required in the 
transmission line if one is going to accept a 



COAX LINE 
TO ANTENNA 







140 
PER 



Fig. 6. Simple transmission line tuner to couple 
coax line operating at a high swr into a transmitter 
requiring 50— 70^ load at a low swr- 



coaxial line operating with a high swr Some 
transmitters wiC accept and load into coaxial 
lines directly which have a high swr. This is 
particularly true for some low-power Novice 
class designs but is generally not true for the 
usual SSB transceiver which will not tolerate 
a line swr of over 2: K Usually, however, one 
also has to use a low pass filter in the line 
after the transmitter to eUminate TVI prob- 
lems. Such filters if they are to operate 
properly and provide their design harmonic 
attention must be operated in a ''flat*' line. 
There are various forms of tuners that 
one can find described in the various hand- 
books and magazines, I have used the design 
of Fig- 6 very successfully with a number of 
experimental anteima designs and with co- 
axial lines operating at high swr*s. It is the 
familiar ''*trans-match" design* Extra capa- 
city has to be added across the terminals 
*^XX" for use on 40 and 80 meters. The 
exact value depends on the impedance being 
matched and will vary from 100—500 pF, 
Another variable capacitor in series wdth the 
output is sometimes shown with this design 
coupler but I have rarely found it to be 
absolutely necessary if the coil tap point is 
carefully adjusted* The variable capacitor is 
set at maximum to start the tuning process 
and the coil tap pointy using the minimum 
amount of inductance found which produces 
the minimum swr on an swr meter located 
between the transmitter and the tuner (the 
transmitter was initially tuned up using a 
dummy load). The variable capacitor is then 
tuned to further lower the swr and the 
process repeated until the lowest possible 
swr is obtained. As a final check, a field- 
strength meter should be used to check that 
the coil tap position used also provides the 
best field strengths. 

Summary 

Under the initital environmental and con- 
structional restraints stated, a small loop 
appears to offer the best chance of achieving 
a degree of satisfactory multi-band operation 
until a more sophisticated multi-band an- 
tenna can be installed. The charts and 
example presented should aUow one to 
arrive at a design which satisfies almost any 
immediate need, 

. , .W2EEY 



80 



73 MAGAZINE 






Caveat Snptor? 



♦:♦:♦:♦:♦:♦;♦:♦:#:♦:♦:♦:♦ 



Pnce - S2 per 25 words for no r> -commercial 
ads. SID per 2S words foe busmen ventures No 
display ads or agency discount fncfude vour 
check With order 

Deadhne for ads *i the \jn of ihe rnonth tvwo 
rFionths pfKSf to publication Fo» example: 
January tit is the deadline for ilie M^ch tsfijp 
which wiiHae maited on ihe TOih of Februsfy. 

Type copy. Phrnse and punctuate eK^ctly 35 
you wish It io appear. No all capital' ads, 

We wHI be the judgp of suitability of ads. Our 
re^onjibiJity for errors extends only to print 
ir^ a correct ad m a later issue 

For $1 emra we ta^n maintain a reply box for 
you. 

We canrwt thtck into eadi adv«rtr&er . so Oweai 
Emptor . . 



SSTV FOCLIS/DEFLECTIO\ COIL 
KIT for K7YZZ 15i"Plumbicon type 
camera circuit (re, 73 Magazine, Sept. 
72) complete with reprint article. 
$19.95 postpaid rn U.S. and Canada. 
Also fast scan 114" coil kits as well as 
many other SSTV kits, parts and 
plans. See regular ad elsewhere in 
magazine. Write or phone for free 
catalog. ATV RESEARCH, 1301 N. 
Broadway, Dept 73C, Dakota City, 
Nebr. 68731, 

PC BOARDS, CW Time Identifier 
$12.50, RTTY Speed Converter 
$5.00, TT Decoder $6.50 300 MHz 
Decade Scaler $T95. All boards sent 
ppd & drilled. Many others available. 
Charles R. Sempirek/KSWDC, Rt 3, 
Box 1,BeHaire, Ohio 43906. 

ACTIVE HAMS ^ Monthly mailer of 
reconditioned and new equipment 
specials. Self - Buy — Trade. Write 
Associated Radio, 8012 Cooser, Over- 
land Park, Kansas 66204. 

DEI.MARVA HAMFEST, August 19, 
1973. Harrington Fairgrounds. Regis- 
tration fee $2 advance, $3 at the gate. 
For information, write Delmarva 
Hamfest, Inc., Route 2, Box 90, 
Laurat, Delaware 19956. 

FOUNDATION FOR AMATEUR 
RADIO annual Hamfest Sunday 21 
October 1973 at Gaithersburg, Mary- 
land Fairgrounds. 

GREATER INDIANAPOLIS HAM- 
FEST, August 12, 1973, Gas Co. 

Recreational Area, 2 miles east of 
Emerson Ave., on Thompson Rd., 
P.O, Box 19449, IndianapoMs, Ind. 
46219, 

COMPLETE SET: 73 Magazine, Vol- 
ume 1, Number 1 to Present, SI 00 
plus postage. Arthur E, Boyers, 719 
Randolph, Topeka, Kansas 66606. 



EQUIPMENT FROM 73 

The following fist of gear, unless 
otherwise noted, consists of brand 
new equipment purchased for testing 
purposes only. Some have been tested, 
some remain unopened in original 
cartons. We are offering this gear at a 
considerable discount on a first-come* 
first-served basis. 
Heath IB 101 and 

Vanquard Scaler S250 

M iida Digipet 60 counter with 
Digipet 160 converter S400 

Tempo CL 220 220 xcvr S265 

HR2MS 8 ch scanning 2m xcvr 
1 5W $255 

TME-H-LMU 16 ch scanning 
rcvr 6/2/Vm $255 

Digital Logiclocks S80 

Midland 13509 220 xcvr S200 

Midland 1520 handheld 2 meter SI 90 
SBE 450 450 xcvr S340 

Clegg 27 B 2m xcvr S3 80 

Dycomm 2m repeater S425 

Standard repeater S550 

HR-6 25W SI 90 

Wilson 6 eL 20m beam $250 

(pick-up only) 

Wilson 7 el. 15m beam $250 

(pick-up onfy) 

RARE BARGAIN! 500 milliamp RF 
meter with 12 watt 50 ohm dummy, 
9.50. 3, 10, Or 15 amp RF, very few, 
act fast, at 3.75. Remit Money Order 
or bank check. Shipped postpaid- 
SSTV, P7, 5 to 10 inch electromag- 
netic and electrostatic focus, 13.50 to 
26.00, ^6d SASE complete specs, 
prices all types, Lotz W5HC0, 750 
Florida Blvd., New Orleans, La, 
70124, 

REWARD for information leading to 
recovery of stolen YAESU FT- 101 
s/n82G12279/CW, 1.8 MHz, CW filter 
Installed; REGENCY HR-2 
s/n03 02030, W4GF, 7216 Valleycrest 
Blvd., Annandale VA 22003 (703) 
560-5229, 

IIOOSIER ELECTRONICS - Your 
ham headquarters in the heart of the 
Midwest where only the finest ama- 
teur equipment is sold. Individual, 
personal service by experienced and 
active hams. Factory-authorized deal- 
ers for Regency, Genave, Drake, 
Standard, Clegg, Ten-Tec, Kenwood, 
Tempo, Midland, Galaxy, Hy-Gain, 
CushCraft, Mosley, Ham-M, Hustler, 
plus many more. Orders for irvstock 
merchandise shipped the same day. 
Write or call today for our quote and 
try our personal, friendly Hoosier 
service. Hoosier Electronics, R.R. 25, 
Box 403, Terre Haute, Indiana 47802. 
(812)-894^2397. 

WARREN HAMFEST, Largest family 

style Hamfest in East. Sunday, August 
19th, @ Famous Yankee Lake Park. 
Giant Fleamarket, Swimming, Pic- 
nicking- All Free, Details OS L 
W8VTD. 



Tl liRS, RKCEIVINC AND TRANS^ 
^IITTING. Many oldies. What do you 
want and what will you pay. B. Weed, 
283 Davis St., Northboro, Mass. 
0153Z 

HAM FESTERS 39th Hamfest and Pic- 
nic, Sunday, August 12, 1973, Santa 
Fe Park, 91st and Wolf Road, Willow 
Spring, (llinois, southwest of Chi- 
cago. Exhibits for 0M% and XYL's, 
Famous Swappers Row. Information 
contact John Rarger K9DRS, 8919 
Goffview, Orland Park, Illinois 60462. 
Tickets write Joseph Poradyla 
WA9IWU, 5701 So. California Ave,, 
Chicago, III. 60629. 

2M FM TRANSCEIVER- Denshi 

(identical with Ross-White - see 73's 
review, April 1972, p,99), 13 
measured watts output, 12 channels. 
Sentry precision, .0005 crystals, 
146.04/64; 13/73; 16/76; 19/79; 
22/82; 25/85; 28/88; 31/91; 34/94; 
94/94; 52/52. Accessories, manual, 
extras, original carton, Phelps-Dod^ 
5/8 wave 3.5 db gain antenna, trunk — 
roof mount. Two months old — too 
much traveling non-repeater-served 
areas, $355 complete. Delivered con- 
tinental U.S. WAIGNX, Bob 
Reinhart, 11 Old Field Road, Roway- 
ton. Conn. 06853. 

*^DON AND ROtr* new guaranteed 
buys. Triex MW50 Tower 250.75; 
MW65 331,50; W51 (FOB Calif.) 
386,00; HAM-M 99,00; TR44 59.95; 
AR22R 31.95; HyGain TH6DXX 
139.00; 204BA 129.00; TH3fVTK3 
114.00; Mosley CL35 149.00; CL33 
124.00; TA33 114.00; MCQ3B 91.00; 
S402 143.00; MP33 90.00; Belden 
8214 RGa/U foam coax 17G7ft; 8448 
Swire rotor cable lOd/ft; Mai lory 
2.5A/1000PIV epoxy diode 29i; 
Write specific needs new panel meters, 
many stock; • quote discontinued 
tubes; Quote Clegg FM27B; Halli- 
crafters FPM300A; Standard; Regen* 
cy; Einrac; Midland 2MFM; Collins 
and CDE replacement parts stock; 
Hardbound technical magazines, many 
types from Petro Library 3.00/yr, 
write needs. 9pin ceramic 6 LQ6 sock- 
et 50cf; 6V/12V/24V/1.5A trans- 
former 2.49; 135V/500MA-6.3V/3A 
2.95; All items guaranteed, shipping 
charges collect, Madison Electronics, 
1508 Mc Kinney, Houston, Texas 
77002(713) 224-2668. 

CANADIANS, FREE 120 page elec- 
tronics catalog, ETCO-B 464 McGill, 
Montreal. 

GIANT N.E. CONVENTION spon- 
sored by FEMARA Sept, 29& 30 at 
Dunfey's Hyannis Resort on Cape 
Cod. Huge flea market, seminars, FM, 
SSTV, NEDXCC, AMSAT, YL trips, 2, 
pools, golf, beaches, sailing. Early bird 
registration still only S3 from 
W1ZQQ, 17 Barnes Ave,, E, Boston, 
Mass, 02128. Special early bird hotel 
discount available. 



1 



JULY 1973 



81 



PLASTIC ENGRAVED CALL 
PLATES w/pin $1,25. WA2UUY, 15 
Vincent St., Pari in NJ 08859. 

HOMEBREW IKW UNEAR W/PS 

$85. ATV camera #XT1 A S65. Home- 
brew ATV 15W xmtr S30. Christie, 
92 25 175th St., Jamatca NY 11433. 

CONSET Communicator III 2 meters 
SI 00, Gonset 3063 2 meter power 
amplifier S75, package Si 50; Motor- 
ola P-33BAC with Ni-Cads 94/94 
34/94 $125; Heath HX-20 $110, 
HR-2a $75, HP-20 $25, HP-10 $35, 
Hustler 80-10 mobile antennas mast 
mount $35, package 5145; you pay 
shipping - W5PNY, 2506-A 35th St, 
Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, 

WANTED OLD RADIO TRANSCRIP 
TION DISCS. Any size or speed. Send 
list and details to Larry Kiner, W7F1Z, 
7554 132nd Ave. M.E., Kirkland, 
W^h. 98033, 

ROANOKE DIVISION CONVEN- 
TION - SepL 14-16, 1973, Reston, 
Va. (near Dulles Airport) Unusual 
wide interest programs and sessions. 
Write K4MD, Box 7388, Warrenton, 
Va. 22186* 

BAHAMAS, Great Exuma Hillside lot 
three way take-off, 80 feet by 125 
feet, $3,000 or nearest. Photos avail- 
able. Talbott, 940 Dell wood, Victoria, 

British Columbia. 



Fl NDLAV ANNUAL HAMFEST, 
Riverside Park, Findlay, Ohio -- 
Sunday, SepL 9 - Advance Donation 
Tickets $LDO from C. Foltz WBUN, 
W. Hobart, Findlay, Ohio 45840. 

■ 

HP416A ratiometer $125. Gertsch 

RT-5R ratiotransformer like new 
$100, Beckmen 7250 BR counter 
S35, Frequency standard — late model 
NAVY - URQ^g. 5, 1, .001 MHz 
output, 220 VAC or 24 VDC emer- 
gency input Similar in specs to a 
Sultzer 5 mth 5P supply $1000. Will 
consider trade for surplus video equip- 
menL. Norman Gillaspie, Box 2124, 
Monterey, CA. 93940. 
1-408-375-7424. 

WANTED!! Engineer/Techmcian 
ready to meet the challenege of 
exciting new products. We want a 
sharp man with experience and ideas 
to join the technical staff of 
ISC/Clegg. Great opportunity for the 
right man. contact Ed Clegg at ISC, 
Ctegg Division, 3050 Hempland Road, 
Lancaster, PA 17601.(717 299 3671) 



MIX PLEASURE MTH PLEASURE. 

1973 Hamburg international Hamfest 
on Sept. 15 only 45 minutes from 
fabulous Niagara Falls, RV parking for 
weekend only, $2.50 wilti hook-up. 
Details: Valerie Orgera K3KQC, 187 
Main, Hamburg, N.Y, 14075, 



DRAKE 2C Xtal Calb. with 2C Q and 
Drake 2 NT xmtr, $295.00. Like new, 
Bart Burne, 1725 Wyoming Ave,, 
Scranton PA 18509. 

FOR sale: Hammariund FM50A. 35 
watt FM transceiver with remote and 
manual, very good condition, $135, 
With xtals foV CAP. SI 60. Shipping 
paid, Patrick Butler, 1833 N, Indiana, 
Peoria, 111.61603, 

WANT HP.35 CALCULATOR, certain 

toy trains; cash or trade FT- 101, 
ML-2. Describe trains by lettering/ 
numbers, not by age. K9CMN, 3381 
Howell, Milwaukee, Wis. 53207. 

COMPLETE STATION S525 firm or 
separate as listed, HT 37 $185, 
SX101A $155, HA 2 with PS $125, 
Home Brew Linear (matches HT 37 
1000 Watts) S100, D104 SI 5, John- 
son Matchbox two element 2 mtr 
collinears with stacking kit $25; will 
not sell separate before chance to sell 
complete. Also have back issues of 
QST from 1925 up — most complete 
— send SASE for list — would prefer 
to sell complete. Write K1VNE, 
Tom, 22 Lockwood St., Bellows Falls, 
Vt. or call days 802-254-9988, 
802-463^4209, 

WILL PAY $4,00 each for magnetic 
tapes for IBM MT/ST Seteetric Com- 
poser. Must be in top condition. Box 

UN11M, 73 Magazine, Peterborough 
N H 03458. 









TALK POWER/ 

TEMPO POWER AMPS up to 135 W 
output with 1 to 
25 W drive 
from mobile, 
base or HT... 



Solid State 

Micro-Strip Circuit! 
Ready -to-go, 
cables supplied. 

AH U.S. Made, 

In stock. Shipped 
the same day U.P.S, 
prepaid, Cashier's 
Check or M.O. 




Models 



MODEL 


POWER tin/out) PRICE 1 


252 


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502 


1 0W/50W 


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502B 


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802B 


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1 002-3 


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220.00 


1 002-3 B 


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235-00 




ERICKSON 
COMMUNICATIONS 

4657 North Ravenswood Avenue 
Chicago, IIL 60640 (312) 334-3200 



NEW!! 

440 MHz PRE AMPS 
*^ ftttpr 



w 



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$29,95 

postpaid 
Model 432PA 



Two «39e KMC Bipolar arKJ MOSFET Frcamp for OX, FM, ATV & 
Sp*ce Work. Typical I V 3.5 dB NF for excellent w«ak signal 
reception. 20 dB Gain. 20 UHi Banclwidih, 12V dc, witti metal ca^se. 
postpaid and guaranteed, Model 432PA Onlv $29.95, 

Super sensitive Model 432PC - 5S above but very low noise K6007 
input stage, 1 .5 to 2.0 dB NF S69.95. 



$54.95 

postpaid 
Model 432PA1 



Preamps with ail tHe aoove reaiures pi us ac Pov*r Supply and Oie 
Cast Cabinet: 

Model 432PA 1 (3.5 dB NF) $54.95 
Model 432PC 1 f T.S to 2.0 dB NF) $94.95 






n 



i^^ 



faborofories 



Write tar Qurnew catalog of 
VHF/UHF Converters and Preamps. 

P.O. Box 112 

Sliccasunna NJ 07876 
201-584 6521 



82 



73 iVlAGAZINE 



SPINOFFS: 



Charles J. Viahos WB2ICV 
15 Indian Drive 

Woodvliff Lake NJ 07675 



ROM NASA 

TO THE 

RADIO AMATEUR 



Probably better than anyone else, the 
radio amateur fully recognizes that one 
of the great sophistications of our space 
program has been radio communications. 
The many successes of our manned and 
unmanned capsules and satellites are old hat 
by now, but consistent success obviously 
would not have been possible without sig- 
nificant advances in telemetry, communica- 
tions^ and more specifically, electronics. 
Probably no industry in the world, at any 
time, has advanced the state of the art of 
electronics as has NASA, through its vast 
network of contractors and subcontractors. 
Fortunately for general industry and 
for the radio amateur - NASA and the 
Atomic Energy Commission have established 
a program to disseminate much of this 
information to the general public. NASA 
calls this program the 'Teclmology Utiliza- 
tion Program/' Its purpose is just what it 
says, to pass on to the public those develop- 
ments which could have potential use out- 
side the aerospace and nuclear communities. 
The object of all this is to allow NASA and 
the AEC to earn for the public an increased 
return on the public's investment in aero- 
space and nuclear research and development 
programs. The whole concept is often refer* 
red to as the "spinoffs" from space. 

In the course of my work, 1 have been 
privileged to review many of the publica- 
tions published for this purpose by NASA- 
While many of the offerings are highly 



specialized and mostly applicable to indus- 
try, we did note a few that are worth passing 
on to the radio fraternity. 

What follows are selected extracts that 
appeared in recent NASA bulletins, more 
specifically, SP-5942(01) and SP-5943(01). 
The first bulletin is entitled, **DC Power 
Circuits^' and the second, **TestLng Methods 
and Techniques: Testing Electrical and Elec- 
tronic Devices/'' Both bulletins are available 
through the National Technical Information 
Service, Springfield VA 22151, at $L00 a 
copy* Each bulletin also includes a reader's 
service card for additional information. 



OA 




OB 



Fig. !• Dual-voHage power supply with increased 
efficiency. 

You will note in each case values of 
electronic components are omitted. This was 
not an oversight^ as the buliclms do not as a 
rule s1u)w the value of the specific compon- 
ent to use. It*s quite possible that sending in 
the reader's service card mentioned above 
will bring the reader this additional informa- 
tion. On the other hand, the more know- 
ledgeable and enterprising amateur can sub- 
stitute his own values and still get the 



JULY 1973 



83 




NOW 

Bomar Dealers have ample stock 
for all popular 2-meter transceiv- 
ers and scanners plus certificates 
for special crystal needs. 



WRITE FOR NAME OF NEAREST DEALER 




'*long playing" crystah 

BOMAR CRYSTAL COMPANY 

201 Blackford Ave., Middlesex, N. J. 0884S 
Phone (201) 350-7787 



VARIABLE CAPACITORS 

n.iipi-tif]nK, 400-4ilO'l-lO pf. Reefftv^f hpe, rpramk irtfiiilalKin. 2 3/4" \ 
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w. n 6" 1. Slwft i/a" iL s S/16" I. Fhp*. *rl. 4 Jbv OnJy 25 n 

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a/8^- d. ^ *^/* h ..,,.. .each S{W 

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cc>nvfrtrr#(, !/«'■ d. »liatl _ , , 75^ ta*, 3 for » L8S 

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30 mf % W rof \ 2*1 tnf . SIMI *ifr. ISr-inid, I 3/S" * 3** TH^jftpmnR 
* * * , ,,.,,.,,.-. 71^4 cai'h, ri for S L^^ 

m mH \ in mi. 4^0 %, & 20 mi. 25 vdr. Malloi> KP. I" d. x T I. 
TwijitprfKi^. , , — ,,,,,.,..,,,,,,,,,,. ,3fs*' ^3,* 3 lor S LHO 



Send for our mem flyer full of bargains in aiiplus pans & eauipment. 



Minimum order S2,00 



Please add shipping charges to order. 



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iVe ui^ Master Charge. 



JEFFTRONICS 

4252 Pearl Rd,, CieveJand. OH 44109 



desired results. The code following each 
project is a NASA code for reference pur- 
poses. 

Dual- Voltage Power Supply 

This circuit can be used in lieu of 
relatively complex and expensive voltage 
regulators to supply dual voltages wherever 
precise voltage regulation is not required. 

Figure 1 shows the primary winding of 
the power transformer is connected to the ac 
source, and the secondary winding is con- 
nected to the full-wave rectifier consisting of 
diodes Dl and D2. The unfiltered output 
from the fuU wave rectifier is fed, in parallel, 
to a conventional choke-input filter branch 
and a diode-capacitor branch* The diode^ 
D3, in this branch conducts on the peaks of 
the full-wave' rectifier current and charges 
capacitor CI to the peak voltage across 
one-half of the secondary winding of the 
power transformer. The voltage at terminal 
A is approximately 40% greater than at 
terminal B, The required peak inverse- 
voltage rating of diode D3 is only one-half 
the peak voltage across the full secondary 

winding. For maximum voltage output at 
terminal A, a high conductance semiconduc- 
tor diode is used in the branch. Source: 
Lewis Research Center (LEW-90107). 



+2B 

VDC 



rr 



< 



X 




2i VOC SOURCE 
{CENTER TAPPED} 





+4 TO +14 
VOC 



-4 TO -14 
VDC 



Fig. Z Duai polarity power supply^ 

Dual Polarity Power Supply 

A majority of electronic systems use 
individual oscillator-transformer-rectifier 
power supplies > operating from 28 V dc to 
supply a positive and negative voltage for the 
subassembly units. In Fig. 2, the dual polar- 
ity power supply provides a +14 and -14V to 
operate the various subassembly electronic 
modules directly, instead of using a 28V dc 
supply with the negative terminal grounded. 
Other 28V accessories; i,e., motors, relays. 



84 



73 MAGAZINE 



-O+VS 




Fig, 3. MOSFET improves power supply regulator. 

and solenoid valves can be operated on a 
28V input, with the return to -14V, Using 
separate supplies provides a measure of 
redundancy and minimizes electronic inter- 
ference from closing relays and switches. 

The circuit performs the function of a 
power distribution network for the other 
modules, without the need of a transformer. 
Important advantages of the unit include 
significant reductions in weight, size and 
costs, and internal power dissipation. 
Source: G.O. Bohot, P.E. Fincik, and AX. 
Vameau of No, Am. Rockwell 
Corp. under contract to Manned 
Spacecraft Center (MSC'17072) 



MOSFET Improves Performance of Power 
Supply Rejgulator 

The circuit shown in Fig. 3 provides a 
higher degree of power supply voltage regu- 
lation and temperature compensation than a 
conventional circuit using a zener diode as a 
voltage reference. The improvement is made 
possible by using a MOSFET, 04, as the 
voltage reference in place of the zener diode. 
As in the case of the conventional regulator^ 
the improved regulator utilizes a bridge 
circuit Rl, R2, Q4 (in place of a zener 
diode) and R3, and a difference amphfier 
consisting of Ql, 02, and R4, and R5 
allowing initial operation at power turn-on. 
The regulator performance is determined by 
the voltage difference between VI and V2 
produced by a change in regulator supply 
VR, The difference amphfier gain and cur- 
rent gain of transistor Q3 ampUfy this 
voltage difference to determine the closed 
loop performance. Cross coupling of the gate 
of Q4 to the base of Ql allows Q4 to serve 
also as an additional amplifier. 
Source: D.C. Lokerson, Goddard 

Space Flight Center {GSC- 10022) 

Testing Semiconductors Without 
Disconnecting Them From Circuit 

An oscilloscope, together with the test 
circuit shown in Fig. 4, can be used to check 
semiconductors that are wired into a circuit. 
For transistors, approximate gain and linear* 
ity can be determined; for diodes, open 



TRANSISTOR 
UWDER TEST 



PNP 




HORIlOmTAL^ 



TO 

OSCILLOSCOPE 




PNP 
TRANSISTOR 




NPN 
TRANSISTOR 




NON- LINEAR 
TRANSISTOR 




GOOD 
DIOOE 



© 



DIOOE 
REVERSED 
IN TESTER 




OPEN 
CIRCUIT 



© 



SJHORT 
CIRCUIT 



FigA. Circuit for testing semiconductors **in circuit*' 



JULY 1973 



85 



(nput ConnectOf 



Standoff 
Ins 



Cou nt^rbatarice 




Fig.S. Economical weatherproof helical antenna. 



circiiitS) short circuits , and reversed polarity 
are indicated clearly. The quality and break- 
down point of low voltage (less than lOV) 
zener diodes can be measured* 

The idealized oscilloscope traces show the 
types of waveforms to be expected under 
various circumstances, provided that the 
impedance of the external circuit is much 
greater than that of the component under 
test. If this is not so, the waveforms will 
vary, depending on the external circuit 
properties. In either case, when an assembly 
to be tested contains multiple identical 
circuits, the tester may be employed to 
identify a defective component- 
Source; B.C. Allen of No. Am, Rockwell 
Corp. under contract to Marshall 
Space Flight Center (MFS-1 163) 

Besides the reports mentioned above, 
NASA also published periodic *Tech 
Briefs," short data sheets which describe 
specific solutions to specific problems. One 
such Tech Brief - #70-10016 — describes a 
simple and economical helical antenna that 
has appUcation to amateur radio: 

The Problem: To provide an inexpensive, 
weatherproof, helical antenna which requires 
minimum maintenance and which can be 
easily transported and assembled. 

The Solution: Previously, helical antenna 

ments have been formed from soft copper 



tubing, shaped with a customed-machined 
mandrel. Antennas made by this method are 
very expensive, and furthermore, are suscep- 
tible to corrosion. Both of these problems 
have been solved by using a semi-rigid 
coaxial cable to form the helical element. 

How lt*s Done: The helix of the weather- 
proof antenna illustrated in Fig. 5 Is made of 
foam dielectric, heUax transmission line that 
has been shorted out at each end. The helix 
is formed by mounting the transmission line 
on standoff insulators, which are attached to 
the antenna shaft. By this technique, the 
heUx can be formed with any diameter, 
pitch, or taper without requiring expensive 
tools or techniques. Because the p conduc- 
tors are sealed in plastic, the resulting 
antenna element is highly corrosion resistant 
and may be used at seacoast faciUties or on 
range tracking ships with minimum main- 
tenance. 



Note: No additional documentation is 
avaUable. Specific questions, however, may 
be directed to: Technology Utilization Offi- 
cer, Kennedy Space Center, Florida 32899, 
Reference: B70-10016- This invention is 
owned by NASA and a patent application 
has been filed. 

. . ,WB2ICV 



86 



73 MAGAZINE 



i 



GR 




TUNING 



P. Fischer VE3GSP 
1379 Forest Glade Road 
OakviUef Ontario 
Canada 



DIP 



THE 



QUAD 



This article describes an effective pro- 
cedure of tuning the radiators and 
parasitic elements of a quad antenna with 
the aid of a grid-dip meter. It is important to 
tune not just the radiators but also the 
reflector and director elements for optimum 
results* 

Some time ago, I ordered my 3 band> 2 
element spider type fiberglass quad. I assem- 
bled it according to instructions, fit the 
toroid balun to permit a single feedline and 
put it on top of my tower. 

Then I asked a friend to supply me with a 
steady carrier signal on the 3 bands to adjust 
the reflector stubs for optimum front/back 
ratio. 

On 15 and 10 meters I couldn't reach a 
maximum since there was not enough to 
shorten out, and on 20 meters I had to add a 
few cm of stub wire to reach a maximum, 
My front /back ratio was less than 2 S*units 
for the 15 and 10 meter band and between 3 
and 4 S-units for 20 meters. 

After this tedious tower climbing exercise 
I checked my SWR on all bands. It was 3:1 
on the average. The feedline was shortened 
foot by foot and eventually I reached a 
glorious SWR of 2:1 on 20 and 15, and 
2.8: 1 on 10 meters. * 



Well, I wasn't pleased with it and there 
was a long way to go for the manufacturer's 
spec of 1-14:1 on all bands, I borrowed an 
antenna bridge (antenna-scope) to measure 
the antenna impedances at the various 
bands. The results were inconclusive; maybe 
the bridge didn't work well or the radiators 
were too far off resonance. After that I 




The author contemplates the problem of getting 
his new quad to tiie top of his tower. 



JULY 1973 



87 



FM YOUR GON5ET 

im yuiir Cleii 22 tr^ Poly Cutmu 2. PC 62. Juhnwii 

mi. A**iiniun 500. HA4CD. TX 62ui VHF IJ 



New! Ptug-in modulator 
puts t h « 
Communicator 
transmitter on FM* 
No modification or 
rewiring on your 
Communicator Just 
plug into mike jack 
Bnd crystal socket. 

Compact self-contained 
modulator mea54jres 



• Works with Comtnunicator I, M, HI, IV 

and GC-105, and other ri^ listed. 

• FM at a tenth the cost of a new rig. 

« Frequency adjust for netting built in. 

• $3430 postpaid U.S.A. $36.50 for PC 2, 

PC62, HA -460. Specify transmitter 
model. California residents add 5% 
sales tax. (HC-6/U crystal and 9 volt 
transistor battery not supplied.) 

• Sand for free descriptive brochure. 




NGINE 

BOX 455, ESCONDIDO. CA 92025 



with DATAK's 







EASY — patterns rub down 
directly on the copper 
board and connect with 
rub*down lines or tdpes 

supplied. 

FAST^safe new etchants 
will etch a 2 oz. copper 
board in 30 minutes. 

ACCURATE — ±.002' print 
tolerance so parts and 
connectors mate with no 
errors. 



Circuit Made With ER 1 



LETE ER-T SET contains hundreds of dry trans- 
fer DIP, flalpack, TO-5. IC, and transistor patterns? 
K** and Ht" etch resist tapes; 4 copper clad boards; 
% lb. dry etch; tray and instructions. $4*95 ppct« 

IN STOCK AT ALLIED AND OTHER DISTRIBUTORS 

WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG listing this and many 
other dry transfer marking sets. 

The DATAK Corporation 

as Hislilind Avtnue • Pattaic, New Jersey Q70S5 



decided to use a grid-dipper to check the 
resonance frequencies of all radiator and 
reflector elements. 

Radiator Resonance Measurement 

I connected a 5 turn * 'pick-up" coil to the 
end of the coax feedline down in my shack 
and dipped the resonance frequencies of the 
3 bands carefully. The dips were weak but 
readable. Before measuring each band I 
calibrated the grid-dipper on my receiver- 
Only the 20 meter radiator resonated within 
the amateur band, while the IS and 10 
meter radiators were 500 and 900 kHz 
below the band edges. 

To measure the reflectors I climbed up 
the tower and tried to dip the reflectors by 
coupUng the grid-dipper to the reflector 
loops. Unfortunately I couldn't get a dip at 
all. Upon this I took my quad down and 
stuck it on a 3 meter pipe in my back yard. 
Down there I measured the radiator reso- 
nances to know the ground effects on the 
resonance frequencies. The resonance fre- 
quencies were about 100 kHz lower than up 
in the air. 

All radiator wires were readjusted to give 
resonance readings at 14.05, 21.05 and 28.5 
MHz (this measurement was done with the 
feed line connected). Up in the air this 
should give me my desired centerband fre- 
quencies of 14J5, 21.15 and 28.6 MHz, 

Reflector Resonance Measurement 

My next problem was to measure and 
optimize my reflector elements. To do this I 
replaced all tuning stubs with 10 turn, 1 cm 
diameter wide spaced silverware coils. These 
coils were supported on the original nylon 
stub spacers. See Fig. L The reflectors could 
now be dipped easily by coupling the grid- 
dipper to the end of the stub-coils. 

While my 20 meter reflector resonated 
350 kHz below the according radiator ele- 
ment, the 15 and 10 meter reflectors reso- 
nated too low by 900 kHz and L8 MHz 
respectively. Since the 20 meter band per- 



il vlonsi^acer 



ftEFLF€TOR WIPIE 



f^^WM^ 




Fig, 1. 



88 



73 MAGAZINE 



formed best before I readjusted the other 
reflector loops to give resonance frequencies 
of 400 kHz (15 meters) and 500 kHz (10 
meters) below the related radiator resonance 
frequencies. 

I checked and rechecked all resonance 
frequencies and raised the antenna gain. 
Then I redipped all elements ^Hip there." 
This is easy with a 2 element quad since each 
element can be reached from the tower. 
Only the 15 meter reflector required some 
adjustment. 1 shortened 5 of the 10 turns of 
the "stub coil" to increase the resonance 
frequency by 1 50 kHz. 




Results 

Now 1 measured the SWR again. It had 
decreased to: 1.25:1 (20); L15:l (15); 1J:1 
(10); centerband readings, and, at the lower 
band edges: 1,5:1 (20); 1.4:1 (15); 1.6:1 
(10). The front/back signal ratio improved 
also: I measured 3-4 S-units on 20 meters^ 4 
S-units on 15 and 10 meters. At the side of 
the antenna I measured signal rejections as 
high as 10 S-units (60 dB). 



The tuning procedure for a quad antenna 
with a grid-dipper is very effective and gives 
superior results. All antenna elements are 
tuned individually; this definitely beats my 
trial and error technique. Three and four 
element quads can be tuned the same way. 
As a matter of fact, grid-dipping is the only 
way to tune the director elements, since 
neither the F/B ratio nor the directivity 
pattern can be measured sufficiently accu- 
rately to permit precise conclusions. 

The resulting performance and low SWR 
are certainly worth the effort. 

The table below gives suggested resonance 
frequencies for the various bands and ele- 
ments of a quad. Two sets of values are 
given. The values in parentheses give your, 
quad a wider bandwidth and slightly lower 
SWR over the entire band. In return the 
front/back signal ratio and antenna direc- 
tivity decrease somewhat. 

Center frequency 



Reflector 


13.85(13.6) 


20.8(20.5) 


28.1(27.7) 


Radiator 


14.2(14.2) 


21.2(21.2) 


28.6(28.6) 


Director 1 


14.6(14.9) 


21.7(22.0) 


29.2(29.6) 


Director 2 


15.1(15,7) 


22.3(22.9) 


29.9(30.7) 


1 




« 


. .VE3GSP 


JULY 1973 









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<0y 




90 



73 MAGAZINE 



AND 



CC RULES 

GULATIONS, 

97 (10 





Continuing from last month the complete text of the FCC Rules & Regulations 
pertaining to the Amateur Radio Service. 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



07.29 Manner of eouducting examinaUoni. 
97,31 Grading of examinations. 
97.33 Eligibility for re-exaniinatinn, 
&7.35 Additional examination for holders of operator 
licenses obtained by mail. 

Station License© 

Wist General eligribHity for station license. 
&7*30 ^llg^ibility of corporations or organizations to 
hold station lii^nse. 



I 973 Manner of eanducting examinations. 

(a) Except as provided by i l>7.28, the examination 
for Amateur Extra, Advanced and General Classes of 
a en a ten r operator licenses will be conducted by an 
ftuthotlzed CommiBi*Ion employee or representative it 
locations and at time^ specified by the Gomml^e^on, 

(h) Unless other wise prescribed by the Commission, 
U examination for the GanditionaU 13pchniciaoi^ or 
KoTlce Clasa license will be conducted and anpervided 
hj ft rolnnteer examiner selected by the applicant, A 
Tolnnteer examiner shall be at least 21 years of age 
ftnd shall be Che holder of an Extra. Advanced, or 
General Class Amateur Radio operator Uce!nde, or 
■hall hold a Commercial radiotelegraph operator li- 
cense issued by the Commission, or aba 11 be employed 
In the serrice of the United States as the operator of 
a manually operated radiotele^aph atatton. The 
written portion of the examination shall be obtained* 
aiiiw?rvised, and submitted ia accordance with the 
following procedure: 

(1) Within 10 days after passing the required code 
t^t, an applicant shall snbmit an application (FCC 
Form 610), together with any filing fee prescribed, 
to the Commission's office at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
17325. The application sball include a written re- 
quest from the volunteer examiner for the appropriate 
examination papers. The examiner^s written request 
shall include (i) the names and permanent add^ess^s 
of the examiner and the applicant, (ii) a cle^:cription 
of the examiner's qualifications to administer the 
examination, (ill) the examtner*s statement that the 
applicant has passed the code test for the clasa of 
license involved under his supervision within the 10 
days pri^ir to aubmlsston of the request, and (iv) the 
examiner's written siguature. Bscamluatiou papers 
wUl be forwarded only to the volunteer examiner. 



HoTB : Wh(*n the lippUcaQt lb entitled to e'camiQatioti crf^dlt 
f(^T the code lent under oEie of the pro^rlaJonn of § 97,23, ao 
aiHJlicatioa maj be flwbmltted without regard to the lO^d/ijr 
linutittioii. The pxmnliier a request shf^uld tbeii state that 4 
coiJe test was not atimlnistered for tluit reusao. The applicuat: 
iht^tild furnlBh dctaLln us to the eia8!4. Dumber* and eiptratiua 
date of any Comnierciii] radiotelegraph lleea^e involved. 

(2Ji The volunteer examiner shall be responsible for 
the proper conduct and neeesisary supervision of the 
examination, Admintstration of the examination 
shall be in accordance with the Instructions included 
with the examination papers and a^ prescribed in 
1107.29 (c) and (d). 97.31, and 97.33. 

(3> The exn mi nation papers, either completed or un- 
opened in the event the examination is not taken« shall 
l>e returned by the volunteer examin^^r t^ the Commit* 
slon*s office at Gettyytiurg, Pa.* no later than 30 dayw 
after the date the pai»ers are mailed hy the CommiHsiou 
(tlie date of miilUng is normally hftuiuped by the Com- 
mi?jsion on tlie outride of the exaniinailon envelope). 

(c) The code test required of an applicant for ama- 
teur radio operator license, in accordance with the 
provisions of f| 9^7.21 and 97.23 sball determine the 
applicant's ability to transmit by hand key (straight 
key or, if supplied by the ai^plicant, any other tyiw 
of hand operated key such as a semi-antoniatic or 
electronic key) and to receive hs ear. in plain Ian* 
fuage, me^^lage^ In the International Morse Code at 
not less than the prescribed Si)eed. free from omission 
or other error for a continnous i>eriod of at least 1 
minute during a test period of 5 minutes counting 
five characters to the word* each numeral or punctua* 
tion mark counting as tw^o charaofe^rs, 

(dj All written portions of the examinations for 
amateur operator privileges shall be completed by the 
applicant in leg^lble handwriting or hand printing* and 
diagrams shall be drawn by hand, by means of eUht?r 
pen and ink or iienciL Whenever the applicant*! 
signature is required^ his normal signature shall bs 
used. Applicants unable to comply with these require- 
ments, because of physical disability, may dictate their 
answers to the examination questions and the re- 
ceiviug code test and if unable to draw required dia- 
grams, may dictate a detailed descriptton essentially 
eciuivalent. If the examination or any part thereof is 
dictated, the examiner shall certify the nature of the 
applicant's di^hillty and the name and address of 
the person (s) taking and transcribing the applicant's 
dictation* 



JULY 1973 



91 



SPECIAL 73 CRYSTAL BANK 
GIFT SUBSCRIPTION OFFER 

Provide one full y^ar of enjoyment for a friend 
with a year's subscription to 73 Magazine — all 
In exchange for the insignificant sum of $2 and 
one of your unused two meter FM crystals. 

The following benefits aiI I accrue (rom this exchange: 

1. You will Soon h^^ a lot more good friencis a^ word geti out that 
you art givjng away subscriptions to 73. 

2. 73 Mil have a lot more new readen - atnateyrs who will hopefutly 
become piyctioloficBllv dependent upon the magsrin« and renew ai 
the end of the gift ye^ at the regular lubscfiption fate - ther&by 
tvemualtv making this deal wortli while fOF 73. 

3, Vou will have s way to get rid of all those crystals that have been 
kicking around after repeaters have changed cliannels, or you have 
moved from one repeater area to another. 

4, 73 wtU build up a cryttal bank For whatever devifish purposes they 
may have in mind whether it be remaJ of crystals for amateurs ofi 
trips or perhaps even the outright sate of them They might «tf«n 
cook up some son of subscription pfemium arrangement. You T>ever 
know. 

WHAT YOU SEW; 



K The name and address, inclLrding call letters and 3trp, of the friend 
to be endovwd with the gift subscription lo 73. If you send this in by 
June 30th, they should start thefr subs^^ription with the August issue. 
This offer is valid Jor new subscriptions Only, r»ot foiT renewals or 
eje tensions. For S2 we can'e stop and look them up in the computer 
to see if they are already in there. 



2. Send S2 in cash^ check, money order, 
negotiable tor each gift fubscriptioriL 



IRCs, or anything 



3. Tape each crystal to d 3 k 5 card and mark on the card this data: 
fiwke of set the crystal was made for ■ transmit or recetve freqiiency 
youT name, addr^s, arid cali on the card in case the crystal is a 
bummer, in which esse we'll need another one, or %4 to buy a new 
one to replace it in the crystal bank. Crystals for the foUowing 
transceivers are scceptabie: Clegg, Drake, Genave^ Gladding, 
InoyedcomI, Grove, Pearce-Simpson, Ross and White, SBE, Simp- 
son. Sonar. Standard, Svi^n. Teleccr^m, Tempo, Varitronics, Yaesu, 
Use enough tape to hold the crystal to the card, but pEease do not 
overdo iti 



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SO 




92 



SS741 Grading of examinations. 

(a) C&de testg for Bendfns aad recelTlng are grade<l 
separately. Failure to pass the required code test for 
either fiending or receirlo^ will terminate the exam- 
inatioo. 

(b> Seventy 'four percent (74% ) Is the paa^jing grade 
for written examinations. For iLe purpose of irrttdiDg» 
each element required in quaHfjring for a particotar II* 

cense will be considered as a separata examinatioQ. All 
written examinatiana wiU b€ graded only by Ck^mmle- 
sion personnel* 

gd7.3^ Eli^bility for re-examination. 

An applicant who fails examination for an amateur 
operator license may not take another examination for 
the same t)r a higher class amateur operator licenae 
within 30 days, except that this limitation shall not 
apply to an examination for an Advanced or General 
Claaa License following an examination conducteil by a 
Tolnnteer examiner for a Novice, Technician, or Con- 
ditional Class license* 

I 97.35 Additional examination for holders of operator 
licenaea obtained by mail, 

(a) A Heenseo who holds an amateur license which 
was obtained hy a mail examination under the super- 
Tlaion of a volunteer examiner may be required to ap- 
pear for a Comtnlsslon superrlsed license examination 
at a location designated by the Commi»Klon. If the 
licensee falls to appear for this examination when 
directed to do so, or fails to pass such examination, the 
operator licenae Involved Bhall be subject to cancella- 
tion. When a Novice^ Technician, or Conditional Class 
licence is cancelled under this provision, a new license 
will not be issued for the eame dags operator license aa 
that cancelled. 

(b) rReserved] 

(c) A holder of a Conditional Class license, obtained 
on the baais of an examination under the proTisione of 
§ 97*20 (b)p is not required |o be re-examined when 
chang^ing residence and station location to within a 
regular examination areap nor when a new examlna- 
tian location Ib established within -175 miles airline 
distance rrom such licensee's residence and station 
location^ 

Station Lice^^ses 

§ 97.37 General eligibility for station license. 

An amateur radio station license will be issued only 
to a license cl amateur radio opera tor, except that a 
military recreation station license may also be issued 
to an individual not licenced aa an amateur radio 
operator (other than an alien or a representative of 
an alien or of a foreign government), who is in charge 
of a proposed mititarj recreation station not operated 
by the U<S. Government but which is to be located in 
approved public qnartera, 

CI 57.57 revUed eff, XQ^ll^n; Fi(78)-H 

§97J9 Eligibility of corporations or organizations to 
bold station license* 

An amateur station license will not be iBsued i^ m 
school, company, corporation, association, or otner or- 
ganise llun, except that in the case of a bona fide 
amateur radio organization or society, a station license 
may be Issued to a licensed amateur operator, other 
than the holder of a Novice Class license, as trustee 
for such society. 

CI BIM amended eff. IB- 1-72; V/(72)~J3 

(To be continued next month) 



73 MAGAZINE 



^ 



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I can understand why there may be 
some irritation over this at HQ. The 
League is supposed to provide leader- 
ship and to know the answers - and I 
hope I won't be accused of any 
exaggeration when I suggest that 
ARRL could have done a lot better in 
this, I understand that all repeater 
applications using the QST article on 
determining height above average ter- 
rain are being rejected by the FCC I 
understand that the phone companies 
are very upset over the QST article on 
telephone remote control. That's two 
articles, and both bombs. But why 
take out your frustration on me? You 
need someone on the staff with re- 
peater experience. Isn't it time to look 
around and get a staffer who can help 
QST get up to date on the largest 
single facet of our hobby today T 

If there could be more positive 
thinking - trying to help rather than 
trying to bad mouth me and shoot me 
down — I trunk everyone would bene- 
fit. The reason that repeater groui:^ 
turn to me is because ARRL has 
dropped the balL If they could get 
answers from HQ they would. 

Harry, as you know, I have offered 
verbally and in writing to work with 
the League in any way possible 
toward their goal of getting Mr 
Walker transferred so the growing 
flood of restrictive and asinine (to use 
Lew McCoy's word) regulations will 



stop. I think it is important for all of 
us to work together in this if amateur 
radio is to ever get back on its 
feet — and I think you agree. Let's cut 
out the hatchet jobs and work to- 
gether — piease. 

BRAINS TURN TO JELLY 

An article in a recent issue of 
Psychology Today backed up some- 
thing that IVe always suspected; noise 
gradually turns your brains to jelly. 
This backs up my suspicision that the 
FCC is behind a plot to destroy 
amateur radio — it all fits in* Their 
recent ruling seems just to be 
insane — it made no sense at all — no 
one could figure out why the FCC had 
suddenly demanded continuous moni- 
toring of repeaters. Now it begins to 
be clearer — this is part of the plot to 
turn the brains of repeater control ops 
to jelly and thus insure their early 
demise. 

Look what rock music has done to 
the kids! 



Total 



Tech 



FCC EXAMINATIONS 

Let's take a took at a recent 
monthly report on license exams given 
and see what sort of statistics are 
reaching the amateur division chief. 

Okay, let's just look at those figures 
for a minute. Note that high per- 
centage of General failures. The report 
goes on to show that about 60% of 
those taking the written General exam 
fail ft. I'll bet they never read our 
study guide book I 

The 37% overall failure is interest- 
ing. That means that over one third of 
those taking an exam fail it* If you 
think of that in terms of what it costs 
on the average for amateurs to get 
their license — at $9 per try - this 
comes to $14.31 each. When the price 
goes up soon to $10 that will assay 
out at $15.90 average. 

Note that 18% failure rate for 
supervised Tech license exams. The 
report form shows that 435 nriail 
exams were given for Tech and that 
69 failed this - a failure rate of 16%. 

Genera! Advanced Extra 



Supervised 












Exams 


2691 


337 


1582 


511 


261 


Passed 


1692 


277 


838 


371 


206 


Failed 


999 


60 


744 


140 


55 


% Failed 


37% 


18% 


47% 


27% 


21% 



JULY 1973 



93 



Licenses by Classes 



Novice 


Tech 


Condit. 


General 


Advanced 


Extra 


Total 




14862 


58825 


39780 


105149 


38781 


4523 


261,920 




11866 


58561 


:37597 


106957 


37379 


4796 


257,156 


-4764 


12778 


57002 


35988 


108089 


37804 


5881 


257,545 


+ 389 


15910 


54675 


33992 


100064 


45862 


8405 


25S,a08 


+1363 


22694 


53666 


32730 


95394 


50736 


10014 


265,234 


+6226 


23305 


52876 


31706 


91980 


54692 


10998 


266,559 


+ 325 


24118 


52224 


30726 


89182 


57283 


11716 


265,249 


- 310 


24052 


51060 


29193 


85971 


59288 


12239 


261,808 


-3441 



3^6 
3-67 
3-68 
3-69 

3-70 
3-71 
3-72 
3-73 

This would seem to put the lie to the 
theory propounded by Walker that a 
high percentage of the mail exams are 
passed fraudulently. Those per- 
centages are almost exactly the same! 
The amateur going for the Tech or 
the Extra has a pretty good chance of 
making it. The most difficult one is 
the General wfth the 47% failure. 
When you work out the cost of 
getting that license it comes to an 
average of $16.98 at the $9 fee and 
$18,87 when the price goes up to $10 
per try. The fact is that it is going to 
cost about half of those trying $20, at 
least. Mounts up, doesn't it? 



deaf ear to amateur proposals for 
encouraging growth - and they have 
come up with nothing on their own. It 
is way past time for the Commission 
to face its responsibility and do some- 
thing—or else change their basic 
policy and stop preventing amateurs 
from having a say in the thing. 

It is time that amateurs started 
making it known to the FCC that they 
are fed up with ihe situation - that 
new rules are .needed which will en- 
courage growth* 



KC REPEATER SHUT DOWN 

On my recent trip through the 
midwest I got the report that the main 
Kantias City machine had been shut 
down because the local FCC official 300K 
was part of a small competing repeater 
group and forced the big one to shut 
do^vn. It seems that some changes had 
bwn made since the October 17th 
deadline and thus the repeater was not 
exactly the same as before — and thus 250 K 
could not be grandfathered along until 
June 30th. The FCC strikes again! 
Why, oh why don^t they devote even a 
small part of this persecution to the 
CB mess? 

200 K 

FCC RESPONSIBILITY 

Since the FCC has taken over con- 
trol of new ham rules and regula- 
tions - as witnessed by the punish- 
ment licensing deal in the 60's and the 150K 
repeater licensing recently, it follows 
that the responsibility for the growth 
of the service is theirs too. Obviously 
it is the rules which govern, in the last 
analysis, the growth or death of the 
service. lOOK 

Even a casual look at the graph of 
the number of amateure over the last 
twenty years tells the story. Punish- 
ment licensing was proposed by the 
ARRL in 1963 -the FCC futzed 
around for four years - and look at sqk 
the curve! Growth stopped short in 
1963, Now do you really think that 
w^s a coincidence? 

The Commission has done absolute- 
ly nothing whatever, after ten years of 
total stagnation, to get amateur radio 
into gear again* They have turned a 



1950 



IMEW CHANNEL 1 TELEVISION? 

The broadcast magazines and news- 
papers have been reporting new FCC 
interest in channel 1 television — for 
educational stations. Ch 1 was origin- 
ally 50-56 MHz back in 1941 and 



then changed to 44-50 MHz in 1945. 
No TV stations ever used the channel 
and it was reassigned to the land 
mobile serwices. 

If they decide to reassign Ch 1 for 
ETV then they would have to move 
the land mobile users to higher fre- 
quencies. It is possible that they might 
decide that hams in between Ch 1 and 
Ch 2 would cause too much TVI and 
either kill the 6m band, make it 
smaller, or move it a bit. 

We are not in a strong position on 
this because we have far too few 
amateurs to keep this band active. It is 
unfortunate that attempts to open- a 
new hobby class of amateur license 
have been so bitterly opposed by the 
League as this might have provided 
the new amateurs which could have 
occupied the 6m band. We do need a 




64 66 



68 



70 72 



94 



73 MAGAZINE 



lot of new amateurs and it would 
seem of first importance to figure out 
how we are going to get them. We 
don't need 10% more, we need 500% 
more, 

RIPPED OFF RIGS 

Several of the Dayton Hamvention- 
eers who were staying at the Howard 
Johnson motel had their cars broken 
into and their rigs ripped out. In one 
case the burgfars were not able to 
easily remove the rig so they chopped 
put the dashboard, rig and all, leaving 
a shambles. Maybe we should leave 
the rigs on the seat, ready to go? 




Mr. Johnson shrugged uis 
shoulders, when asked about his lia- 
bility as hotel keeper. Those amateurs 
who had made peace with their in- 
surance agents v^ll probably be reinn- 
bursed to some extent Obviously you 
have a lot to gam and nothing to lose 
if you get together with your agent 
before the rip off and make sure that 
you are actually insured - and that 
you will get enough to buy a new rig 
when yours is stolen* Find out about 
the equivocation before the fact in- 
stead of fuming at the agent after- 
vi^rd. 

it doesn't hurt one bit to. make a 
note Sonne v^ere of the serial numbers 
of the gear involved — and what can it 
cost you to write your name and 
address inside the case with a vibrator 
tool? As soon as you discover the 
tragedy notify the local fuzz and get 
that event into the record. You could 
do worse than send the serial numbers 
to 73 — a couple of rigs have been 
found this way so far — and if vve 
work up 3 truly definitive list it will 
be used by everyone. As long as some 
send a note to OST — some to CQ and 
some to 73, there are too many places 
to look and it is all a waste of time. 
And note that 73 is the ONLY maga- 
zine that keeps the list going, month 
after month. 

Another idea - the next time you 
hear a strange voice on the repeat- 
er—someone who obviously doesn't 
know wfiat is what — instead of scar- 
ing him, why not get into a conversa- 
tion with a buddy a little bit later over 
the repeater and mention that you are 
really in the market for another rig — 
have money at hand to pay for it — 
and give your phone number — you 
might catch a thief. 



Once you have your insurance to 
protect you, you still have every 
reason to try to keep from being 
robbed. It does not do the car any 
good to have, the wind wing bent 
backwards — the cloth roof slit — a 
window broken - things like that. 
And if you have to collect from ye 
insurance company you can bet that 
your premiums will soon be prohibi- 
tive — not to mention any deductible 
amounts. 

Of course it is basic to make it a 
practice not to watk off and leave 
your car unlocked — that's giving your 
gear away — and perhaps the car too. 
Make every effort to lock your car 
even in lots where they want you to 
leave your keys — some of my worst 
loss^ have been in these lots — and 
they accept no responsibility when 
they clean out your car for you. Do 
they pay those boys low wages and let 
them make it up this way? 

If you are going to park your car in 
high risk areas (like within 100 miles 
of Manhattan) it might be smart to 
plan ahead and make a fast removal 
installation of the rig so you can put it 
in the trunk when you leave your 
car — compfete with the magnetic 
mount antenna — you don't need a 
flag up there saying looky here, bread 
for the taking. Cigarette lighter plugs 
v^rk fine and allow the rig to be 
packed away in less than one minute. 

Those power amplifiers can go 
under the seat out of sight since you 
don't have to reach it to use it 
anyway — or you can mount it in the 
trunk — under the hood — etc. 

Car burglar alarms are okay too — 
particularly if you put in one that will 
notify you by radio when you have an 
unwelcorne guest in your car. Lacking 
the money, energy, or interest to 
install one of these, you can sneak by 
with some burglars by buying a sticker 
that says you have an alarm. It can't 
hurt . . . unless a chap happens along 
who prefers a challenge in his work 
and is looking for a decal llke*that so 
he can express himself. Mostly it will 
turn off the run-of-the-mill crook. 

MORE ROOM ON 20M? 

Somehow I expect that the devel- 
opment of sideband is not quite the 
end of the line for amateur radio voice 
communications. True, we don't have 
anything really in the works right 
now— nothing with which amateurs 
are experimenting on the bands in the 
hopes of developing new techniques, 
but I will be surprised if a group 
doesn't come up with something soon. 

Back soon after WW II we found a 
small group of amateurs experiment- 
ing with narrow band FM. I remember 
those early trials, led by Jack Babkes 
W2GDG in Brooklyn. At first he got 
special authorization from the FCC to 



try out the system — then, when it 
proved workable, the Commission 
opened segments of the bands for 
NBFM and Jack was in business with 
Sonar Radio making narrow band FM 
gear, 

NBFM had some gr^at advantages 
over AM — no big modulator and 
modulator power supply, for instance. 
But it had one enormous disadvan- 
tage — unless you had an FM detector 
on your receiver, AM would over- 
power the IM8FM signal. And for 
some reason, though the circuit was 
extremely simple, the popular receiv- 
ers never included this FM detec- 
tor - so NBFM gradually died out 
Pity. 

In the very late 40's and early 50's 
another group of experimenters start- 
ed work on sideband - single side- 
band. This was quickly grabbed up by 
Art Collins and sideband took over 
not only amateur radio, but the mili- 
tary too. Another system was being 
pioneered by G*E. at the same 
time — and it seemed to have some 
important benefits over SSB - but 
Collins had a lot more political savvy 
than G.E. and the double sideband 
system, never got a good chance to 
prove itself. 

Before you jump hastily to con- 
clusions about two sidebands taking 
up more bandwidth than one, you 
should consider the importance of the 
synchronous detector — a little gadget 
Which permitted signals with identical 
signals on both sidebands to come 
through, but kept out any which were 
not on both — with the result that 
you could copy a DSB signal right 
through a SSB signal — and could 
copy DSB signals only a few hundred 
cycles apart. It is possible that we 
could have a fraction of the QRM on 
our phone bands if ww had gone the 
DSB route. 

There are some techniques which 
hold promise for allowing less conges- 
tion on our phone bands. Some ama- 
teurs are beginning to work with 
digitalized voice systems. I don't 
know how narrow thiS would make a 
signal, but t suspect that it could get 
down to less than 1 kHz. That would 
help a lot. 

Another possibility might be time 
diversity, I'm not sure what we would 
use for a standard clock to keep 
everyone in sync, but we know that it 
IS possible to break voice up into small 
segments and send just a part of them 
and the result will sound normal. We 
could probably get five to ten stations 
on each frequency with this type of 
system. 

There are undoubtedly other ways 
of going about this — any news from 
readers on this — or the above? 

- . .Wayne 



¥ 



JULY 1973 



95 



■I 



i 



For the most powerful antennas under the sun 




260 



261 



Go all the way into 




There's nothing half-way about the new Hy- 
Gain REPEATER LINE. 

Designed for the man who demands profes- 
sional standards in 2 meter mobile equipment, 
the REPEATER LINE is the 2 meter HAM's 
dream come true. It's got everything you need 
for top performance... toughness, efficiency 
and the muscle to gain access to distant re- 
peaters with ease. Reaches more stations, fixed 
or mobile, direct, without a repeater. 

The right antennas for the new FM transceivers 
...or any 2 meter mobile rig. 

Rugged, high riding mobiles. Ready to go 
where you go, take what you dish out... and 
deliver every bit of performance your rig is 
capable of. 

260 Commercial duty 1/4 wave, claw mounted 
roof top whip. Precision tunable to any dis- 
crete frequency 108 thru 470 MHz. 17-7 ph 
stainless steel whip. 

261 Same as above. Furnished complete with 
18' of coax and connector. 



262 



262 Rugged, magnetic mount whip. 108 thru 
470 MHz. Great for temporary or semi-perma- 
nent no-hold installation. Holds secure to 100 
mph. Complete with coax and connector. Base 
matching coil for 52 ohm match. 17-7 ph stain- 
less steel whip. 



96 



73 MAGAZINE 



2 meter mobile! with 



from 



W(f/i!M^i 



263 Special no-hole trunk lip mount. 3 db 
gain. 130 thru 174 MHz. 5/8 wave. Complete 
with 16' coax. Operates at DC ground. Base 
matching coil for 52 ohm match. 17-7 ph stain- 
less steel whip. 

264 High efficiency, vertically polarized omni- 
directional roof top whip. 3 db gain. Perfect 52 
ohm match provided by base matching coH 
with DCground. Coax and connectorfurnished. 

265 Special magnetic mount. 3 db gain. Per- 
formance equal to permanent mounts. Holds 
at 90 mph plus. 12' of coax and connector. 
Base matching coll for 52 ohm match. 17-7 ph 
stainless steel whip. DC ground. 

269 Rugged, durable, continuously loaded 
flexible VHP antenna for portables and wall<ie 
talkies. Completely insulated with special 
vinyl coating. Bends at all angles without 
breaking or cracking finish. Cannot be acci- 
dentally shorted out. Furnished with 5/16-32 
base. Pits Motorola HT; Johnson; RCA Per- 
sonalfone; Federal Sign & Signal; and certain 
KAAR, Aerotron, Comco and Re'^co units. 

Top performance for 2 meter mobiles 

THE REPEATER LfNE 

from 

NY-GAIN ElECTHONICS COHPORATION 

BOX 5407- GF LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 68505 

WRITE FOR DETAILS 



263 



264 



65 



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JULY 1973 



97 




m^a 



JUG 



■ 



/ 






o~- 



a~ FT-101 

Norma f delivery time is — 2 weeks. 10% deposit holds. 

SP-101 Speaker. $19.00 SP-101P Speaker/patch . $59.00 

FV-101 Ext. VFO for 101.99.00 MMB-1 Mobile bracket. .. .9.00 
FA 9 Fan kit for 101 19.00 FL-2100 Linear Amp. . .339.00 

NEW FIdx 401 transceiver. . . same as 570 but includes built-in 
CW filter. AC supply built in. In stock $599.00 

SP-101 Speaker $19.00 SP'401P Speaker/patch. $59.00 

FV-401 Ext. VFO for 401 . 99.00 YD-844 dynamic mic 29.00 

FTV-650 6m Transverter . 149.00 FL-2000B Linear Amp. .339.00 

^*t^ YD-355D Digital readout freq. counter, good 
•AV/T* 5 Hz to 225 MHz. Very sensitive. Beautiful! 
V*^ $289.00 

Financing Through General Electric Credit Corporation 

— Write For Application — 
We service the Yaesu gear we seilf 

S UMMER SA LE - WO W! 

We're clearing out many display units, out-of-date models & 
"white elephants" along with some slow-moving used gear. Low, 
low prices — cash only, no trades, refunds or exchanges. Our loss is 
your gain — act now. 

Quantities limited - write for list. 

ED JUGE ELECTRONICS, INC. 

Home office; DaMes officer 

3850 SOUTH FREEWAY 2860 WALNUT HILL LANE 

FORT WORTH, TX 76110 Closed Sun & Mon. DALLAS, TX 75229 

817-926-5221 214-358-4641 

Hours: 9:00-5:30 Tues. thru Sat. 



I 



98 



73 MAGAZINE 






^ 




1 



K 



■•*. 





Bi 
wasn 
Since 

is absolute 
the ham 

In ad 
(with no 
certificate, 
shack? 

We have 
have a I i mite 
sells for $7, but«or 
jiot order today ami 




ese m your 

is excellent book and 
. The hardbound regularly 
are reducing this book to $5. Why 
ig more of amateur radio? 

c/eWIGRO 




Use order blank on page 101 




JULY 1973 



99 






XI 



ca. 








^ 





mJSim'Ml 



x^ 



fe-P 4»«M*^ftd 



r w 



\ 





WAAS Certificate 

This Worked Al- 
most AU States cer- 
tificate is proof of 
your having 
worked 49 of the 
SO states. It is for 
those who are jusi 
una'ble to get thatf "^ 
last state cod- 
firmed. Printed on 
good paper, 854 x 

11, dated and numbered and s^ned by Wayne Green, 
Ordering this certificate is proof enough that you need 
it. Light green, black printing . . .$1 

RRCC Certificate 

This Real Rag 
Chewers certificate 
is awafdcd only for 
the feat of a non-^ 
stop QSO for a 
period exceeding 
wk hours with no 
time out for any- 
thing. Order must! ^ — '^^w^3Tl 
be accompaniedH^ tt^^Hji&^^U \ '^f<>^^ 
with date/timel W^mJB^BmL -''l »-«>/ " 
(GMT) of start /end of contact, station contacted, and 
your call. Signed by Wayne Green, Light orange color, 
black printing , . * $1 

DX DC Certificate 

Available for those 
who present proof 
of contact (copy of 
log) with 10 differ- '5 
ent countries. 
A warding this certi- 
ficate makes you a 
member of tlie DX 
Decade Club, 
Numbered and dat- 
ed and personally 
signed by Wayne Green, Editor and Publisher of 73 
Magazine, Printed on good paper, light purple color, 
black printing, 8Hx 1 1 , suitable for framing SI. 



RTTY-DXDC 

Frame and hang 
this one above your 
machine. An opera- 
ting award for those 
who have submit- 
ted proof of 2-way 
teletype communi- 
cations with 10 
countries* Endorse- 
ment provisions for 
different bands* 
Dated and signed by Wayne Green, Editor and Publis 
of 73 Magazine. Enclose postage for return of QSLs. 
X 1 1 , light blue color, black printing, 




SSTV-DXDC 

Dress up the shack 
with this award for 
2- way slow scan 
televmon commu- 
nications with 1 
countries. Endorse- 
ment provisions for 
separate bands. 
Dated and signed 
by Wayne Green, 
Editor and Pub- 
lisher of 73 Magazine. Enclose postage for return of 
(jSLs. 8W X 1 1, hght green color, dark green printing, $L 









ULMOOE-DXDC 



^ssunsfis^? 



<*^ ■ M^ ' ■■ 








All Mode DX DC 

How many can 
qua lif y for this ' 
one? An award for 
2- way communica-^ 
tions with 10 coun- 
tries using 
CW^SB-KITYSSrV 
modes. Certificate 
dated and signed 
by Wayne Green • 
Editor and Pub- 
lisher of 73 Magazine. Enclose sufficient postage for 
return of QSLs. 8% x 11, light red color, black 
p rinting, ,•,♦.,..........-• SI. 

Undtr Stan ding 
XYL/OM 

An unusual certifi- 
cate — get one and 
keep your male 
happy. An award to 
those who have the 
good fortune of 
having an under- 
standing partner 
who appreciates all 
good things about 
amateur radio 
(staying up all night, spending money for rigs, etc.). 
Sworn statement attest mg to this must be submitted. 8Vi 
X 1 1 , light blue color, dark blue printing .$ 1 





>i**i 



LnTY-moic 





her 
SI 



CHC Certificate 

Presented to those 
who submit a sworn 
statement that they 
have never received ^ 
a certificate for ra* ^ 
dio operating and if 
they ever receive 
one, they will hate 
it. This certificate 
shou Id be your first 
before you acci- 
dentally do something and receive a certificate for it. 
This attests to your membership in the Certificate Haters 
Qub. Light purple, black printing, 8Vix 1 1 * . .$1 





Fascinating World of Radio Communications . . 

Novice Class Study Guide 

General Class Study Guide 

Advanced Class Study Guide 

Extra Class Study Guide, reduced price 

VHF Projects for Amateur & Experimenter . , . 

VHP Antenna Handbook 

How to Use FM, an introduction 

FM Repeater Atlas, worldwide w/maps 

FM Repeater Circuits Manual 

Digital Control of Repeaters, new 

RTTY Handbook, radio teletype A to Z 

ATV Anthology, fast scan VHF TV ...... 

SSTV Handbook, new, only slow scan avail. 
Diode Circuits Handbook, galore 
73 Transistor Circuits, all useful 
Transistor Projects, mucho .... 

Solid State Projects 



<■ » 



m * 



* * 



• • 



« » • • • 



* « 



■ m 



# * i * 



m w m 



4 • f « * 



• • • 



• • 



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4 * « - 



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* * « 



IC Projects •. 

108 Q & A, transmitting, receiving, ant 

TVI Handbook, why suffer 

Coax Handbook, cables & connectors . 

DX Handbook, w/map 

World DX Map, wall size, rolled 

Custom DX Bearing Charts, beam headings , 

U.S. Maps, for WAS, etc (4 ea) 

Call Sign Badges, for lapel, black or red 

Magnetic Call Signs, for autos , 

73 Magazine Binders, beautiful red 

* Hardbound versions available @ $2,00 more. All items postpaid. 



$4.00 
$4.00 
$6.00 
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BOOKS ORDER FORM 



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$ 



enclosed 



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Address 
City 



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Zip 



73 Magazine, Peterborough NH 03458 USA 



JULY 1973 



101 





Would you believe that there are some of us who remember when 73 
Magazine was only 21d a copy? (How time does fly!) 

At the present time our subscriptions are increasing over 1,000 per 
month and we're beginning to realize that 1973 is our year (obviously). 

In order to further accelerate this trend, we're rolling back the 
calendar . . . yes, back to 1960 . . . and Zld a copy. We realize that we 
cannot get rich this way, but who cares when you can make so many 
subscribers happy! 

Now ... for a limited time only . . . (until we regain our 
senses) . . . you can subscribe to 73 for only Zli a copy on a 3-year 
subscription. That's only $13.32 for 3 years. 

Subscribe NOW and have it end in '76. That's the spirit! 



AMATEUR RADIO 
is more fun with 

73 



The regular newsstand cost for 3 years is 
$36.00-subscribe Now and save $22. 




n New Su haarip tion 
□ Renewal or extemrion 



n 



Order Form 

73 Magazine 
Peterborough NH 03458 USA 



3yr$,$13.32 



n 1 yr, $6 



Niiiii. 



Call 



Address 



City 



State 



ZIP 



102 



73 MAGAZINE 







'"\V 



you 

have been 

putting off building 

because of circuit board 

layout; you have no problems 

. . . just send a schematic to PEMCO 

and we will design and build your circuit 

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predrilled material . . . send the schematic and we do the rest. 






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ST-5 KIT OF ELECTRONIC PARTS $ 47.50 

ST-5A BOARD ONLY $ 5.25 

ST-5A KIT OF ELECTRONIC PARTS $ 54.00 

ST-6 BOARD ONLY {These are the 8 original by W6FFC) $ 18.00 

ST-6 KIT OF ELECTRONIC PARTS $128.50 

MOD. KIT FOR UPDATING THE ST-5 TO THE ST5A $ 9.00 

PEMCO MODEL 50A FREQUENCY COUNTER SEMI-KIT $125.00 Hi 

This is a fully assembled and tested board, you add only your own power supply ' |^ 
and cabinet, etc. Write for details. 

You must supply the cabinet, A.C. cord, meter, switches, etc. on all kits except where noted :| 
oth erwise. (All prices are postage paid — we pay shipping J i 

We will do most any printed circuit board for individuals or prototypes. If required we will also | 

00 the layout of the boards. All our boards are G-10 glass-epoxy solder plated and come drilled J| 
only. At present time we can do only single sided. All component parts used in our kits are new :;||^ 
manufacturers stock. We Do Not Use Any Used or Surplus Parts- All inquiries are answered if^ 
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PEMCO 



ELECTRONICS 
MANUFACTURING 



42218thSt.,N.E., Salem, Ore. 97301, (503)585-1641 



iiy:':::-:;';'; 



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JULY 1973 



103 






^07 






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THE REP ATER PRINCIP E 




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FILTER • TELEPHONE REMOTE CONTROL • TONE DECODER VHP LINK REMOTE CONTROL • 
LOGGING CONTROL • 120 VOLT AC OPERATION WITH AUTOMATIC 12 VOLT DC SWITCHOVER 
• CYCLING TRICKLE CHARGER • FUNCTION STATUS DISPLAY LIGHTS AND CONTROLS • 
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104 



73 MAGAZINE 



EXCITING NEW PMPUCTS 





2-METER PREAMP 

20 dB Gain, 2.5 N.F..12V 
dc. Size 1" X I'/i" X %*'. 
Dtode protected MOSFET, 
90-day guarantee. Sh. wt, 4 
oz. Major Components 
Separately Shielded, 

Kit , , $9*50 

Wired. . . $12.50 




m TOKf fNCOP^t 



TONE ENCODER 

Eight p re-adjusted tones. 
Duration and Output ad- 
justable, PLL circuitry for 
extrerrte stability. Choice 
of continuous or tone 
burst operation* Tone 
burst operation requires no 
batteries. Easy to install. 
Includes three speciaf 
single or dual tones, 

TE8-K Kit $31.95 

Wired $39.95 




AHn* 






»fMl 



TOUCH-TONE DIALER 
The etactronic touch-tone 
draper for home and car. 
It's safer and more accu- 
rate to use than a pad. 
Mennory includes Access 
Code plus five phone num- 
bers. Numbers easily up- 
dated. Buftt-in monitor. 
Complete PTT operation 
with transmitter hold. 
TTD-4K 
*, WIRED .$59.00 

Kit -. $49.00 




qaTa INdiNktiiNa \rtC. 



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AUTO'PATCH CONSOLE 

This mobile or home con- 
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A Touch-Tone Pad: an 
automatic dialer for send* 
ing one access code plus 
five Touch-Tone phone 
numbers; a single /dual tone 
burst encoder adjusted to 
your choice of frequency 
above 500 Hz, and a buOt- 
in motor. Complete PTT 
operation with one second 
transmitter hold. 

APC-4K Kit $84.50 

APC-4A Wired . . , . $98.50 

TOUCH-TONE DECODER 

A highly reliable twelve 
digit decoder with input 
protection, and PLL cir- 
cuitry for extremely stable 
operation. Heavy duty out- 
put relays, smaU size, plug- 
in circuit board. All these 
major features at an UN- 
BEATABLE price. 
TTl>12KKit .... $89.50 
TTD'1 2 Wired . . , S129.50 



m*!nik 




TOUCH-ievt #*D 



TOUCH TOfSlE PAD 

In less than 15 minutes 
you can convert your por- 
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TTP Assembled . , . $44.50 

TTP Kit .._.... . $34.50 

PAD-PULSER 
Now you can also obtain 
pulsed operation from 
your Touch Tone Pad. 
Convert Touch-Tone fre- 
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at 2805 Hertz with just a 
flip of the switch. Option 
can be added to TTP 2/K, 
TTD 4/K and APC 4/ K, 

PP-12K Kit $22.95 

PP'12Wired $29.95 

5— year guarantees. Send for Catalog 




VHP FREQUENCY 
STANDARD- FMS 5 
Cal, receive and transmit 
crystals in 10, 6, 2 and 1 '* 
meter FM bands. Markers 
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deviation. Precision 12 
MHz crystaL No unwanted 
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buffered. Sh. wt. 2 lbs. 
(Less Batteries) . . $44,60 
Kit $37.50 




REPEATER ID 

Highly stable oscHlator for 
automatic timing- AC or 
DC operation, ROM pro* 
vides for more than 25 
characters, more than 
necessary for DC "any 
cair' RPT. AUK is auio- 
maticallv added to JO if 
desired when rrvain power 
is Jost. Toneburst opera 
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ID-101K Kit .. _, $49,95 

ll>101 Wired/Tested 

$69.95 

ID-IOIR assembled in VA" 
rack cabinet .*.. $109.00 




TONE DECODER 
Versatile single/dual ton«. 
decoder, PLL circuitry for 
extreme stability. 1 amp 
output relay can be reset 
automatically or manually. 
Monitor position. Adjus- 
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strap selects single or dual 
tone operation. 

TD-2K Kit $31,95 

TD-2 Wired $39.95 



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Phone: 703-321-7171 



1 




JULY 1973 



105 




i 




vmNofBeu 



USED FM GEAR 

Compare our prices on these fine pieces of FM gear... 



I 
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General Electric Transistor Progress LineTPL. 

These units have all solid state receiver, exciter and 
power supply. Standby drain is under 50 mils which is 
ideal if you are in the habit of leaving the rig turned on 
when you leave the car, or if you have battery problems. 

i 

All are narrow band and can be used for commercial service if desired. 

Model FE73JA6 80 watts output $195.00 

Model TE63JA6 50 watts output . $165.00 

Model TE53JA6 35 watts output $155.00 

These units are complete with mike, power speaker and cabtes when needed. 

For motorcycle fans we offer a real deal! 

Motorola T33BAT 10 watts out on two meters, solid state receiver and 

power supply. Easy conversion to 12 volts if needed, 
(see article on page 26 of Ham Radio for July 1972 
for details). Most are complete with mounting 
brackets and accessories. These are a real steal at 
only $65.00 

T33AAT with accessories. $50.00 

DuPage FM, Inc. 
„ _, ^ , _, J P.O. Box 1 

Send your check OT money OTueT today to: . . .,,,-«--« 

Lombard, III. 60148 
3126273540 

Terms: All equipment sold as Is. If not satisfied return for exchange or refund 
within five days of receipt, shipping charges prepaid. Illinois residents add 5% for 
sales tax. 

106 73 MAGAZINE 



IDLAND 



rsji 



fVl 



What 

are we 

handing 

you? 

The most exciting 
2-meter, hand-held 
on the market. . . 
2-watt 6-channel 



#.\ ^ 



.^. — 



V • 



Now Midland— for years one of the 
top names in communication equip- 
ment—brings you a higli perfor- 
mance hand-held transceiver in the 
2-meter amateur band. What do 
you get? A full 2 watts output power 
with automatic deviation control. 
6-channel capability with crystals 
installed for .16/.76, ,34/.94 and 
.94A94. A high performance receiver 
with mechanical filters, IC and 
MOSFET front end. Built-in bat- 
tery/S meter. Compact 9" x 3" x 1%" 



Write for Midland^s fuM-line 
amateur radio brochure: P.O. Box 
19032, Kansas City, MO 64141 

DEALERS: inquire about an 
exclusive Midiand amateur radio 
franchise 



size. Jacks for external speaker, 
microphone, antenna and charge/ 
power. Operation on 8 *'AA" cells, 
ni-cad battery pack or AC power 
supply (all optional). With carrying 
case, less batteries. Model 13-520 



IDLANQ 

ISIIOS COIVIF»>XrMY 

"Coming on Strong in Amateur Radio" 



JULY 1973 



107 



m 



For the most powerful antennas undBr the sun 





the 

2 Meter Fixed Station 



268 



'W' 



Designed for the man who demands professional standards in 
2 meter equipment REPEATER LINE fixed station antennas 
are the 2 meter HAM's dream come true. With everything you 
need for top fixed station performance... toughness, efficiency 
and the gain to gain access to distant repeaters with ease. 
Work many stations, fixed or mobile, without access to a 
repeater 

The right antennas for the new FM transceivers... or any 2 
meter fixed station. 

REPEATER LINE Fixed Station Antennas 

Tough, high efficiency antennas with a long, low radiation. For 
the top signal and reception you want... and the top perfor- 
mance your transceiver's ready to deliver. 




267 



231 15 element high performance 
beam. 17.8 db gain. Coaxial balun. 
Beta Match. Unidirectional. Boom 
length 28'. VSWR 1.5:1 52 ohm 
feedpoint. Extra - strength heavy 
wall commercial aluminum tubing. 

267 Standard 1/4 wave ground 
plane. May be precision tuned to 
any discrete frequency between 
108 and 450 MHz. Takes maximum 
legal power. Accepts PL-259. Con- 
structed of heavy gauge seamless 
aluminum tubing. 



268 For repeater use. Special stacked 4 dipole configuration. 
9.5 db offset gain. 6.1 db omnidirectional gain. Heavy wall 
commercial type construction. 144 thru 174 MHz. 1.5:1 VSWR 
over 15 MHz bandwidth eliminates field tuning. Extreme band- 
width great for repeater use. Center fed for best low angle 
radiation. DC ground. Complete with plated steel mounting 
clamps. 



103 



73 MAGAZINE 



from 



am 



Antennas with real PUNCH! 



340 3 element high perfor- 
mance beam. 9 db gain. Co- 
axial balun. Special VHF 
Beta Match configuration. 
Unidirectional pattern. 
VSWR 1.5:1. 52 ohm imped- 
ance. Heavy gauge alumi- 
num tubing and tough alumi- 
num rod construction. ( I 340 

341 8 element high perfor- 
mance beam. 14.5 db gain. 
Coaxial balun. VHF Beta 
Match. Unidirectional. Boom 
length 14'. VSWR 1.5:1. 52 
ohm feedpoint. Heavy gauge 
commercial type aluminum 
construction. 

338 Colinear ground plane. 3.4 db gain 
omnidirectionally. Vertically polarized. 
52 ohm match. Radiator of seamless 
aluminum tubing; radlals of solid alumi- 
num rod. VSWR less than 1.5:1. All steel 
parts iridite treated. Accepts PL-259. 

362 SJ2S4 high performance all-driven 
stacked array. 4 vertically polarized di- 
poles. 6.2 omnidirectional gain. 52 ohm. 
May be mounted on mast or roof saddle. 
Unique phasing and matching harness 
for perfect parallel phase relationship. 
Center fed. Broad band response. DC 
ground. 



WRITE FOR DETAILS 

For top fixed station performance on 2 meters 

THE REPEATER LINE 

From 

HY-GAm EUCTBONICS CORPORATION 

P. O. Box 5407- GF . Lincoln, Nebraska 68505 



338 



JULY 1973 



10£ 








Iiced 



New lower quantity prices on RF power transistors allows us to offer the 
same quality transmitter for only . .$29.95 . . 



COMPLETE WITH DRILLED BOARD 




TX- 144/220 



TYPICALLY 1 1/2 WATTS OUTPUT 

AT 12.6 VOLTS (1 WATT ON 220) 

ADJUSTABLE DEVIATIONS TO 10 

kHz 

AUDIO CLIPPING AND ACTJVE 

FILTER 

CRYSTAL NETTING TRIMMER 

DOUBLE TUNED RF STAGES FOR 

A CLEAN SIGNAL 

STANDARD 12 MHz CRYSTALS (14 

MHz FOR 220) 

ZENER REGULATED OSCILLATOR 

PROVISIONS FOR METERING 
EACH RF STAGE 

PREDRILLED AND TINNED GLASS 
CIRCUIT BOARDS 

MEASURES ONLY 2" x 6" 



A one watt exciter using four RF transistors, two diodes, and one integrated circuit. The RF 
transistors are operating well below their ratings ellowing long keying periods without damage. The 
exciter may be used alone as a transnnitter or with our PA 144 or 220 ampEifier for a fifteen watt 
station. 



15 WATT AMP 
$29.95 




*l - _ i. 




PA- 144/220 



15 TO 20 WATTS OUTPUT WITH 1 
1/2 TO 2 WATTS DRIVE. (SLIGHT- 
LY LESS ON 220) 

USES TWO BALANCE EMITTER RF 
POWER TRANSISTORS ABLE TO 
WITHSTAND A HIGH SWR. 
TYPICALLY DRAWS 3 AMPS FROM 
A 12 to 14 VOLT NEGATIVE 
GROUND SUPPLY. 
COMPLETE WITH CIRCUIT BOARD 
AND ALUMINUM HEAT SINK. 
ADD YOUR OWN MIN1B0X AND 
RELAY AND SAVE. 



COMPLETELY PACKAGED PA144/220 AMP JUST $49.95 with solid state switch- 
ing. 1-2 watts in gets you 15++ watts out. Size 672X2 5/8X2 with PL-259 in and out 

Order TX-144 orTX-220, $39.95 PA-144 or PA-220, $29.95. Add 1.00 postage and handling for 
each kit ordered. New York State residents add sates tax. 




HF ENGINEERING 

320 Water Street POB 1921 
BINGHAMTON. NEW YORK 13902 




I 



110 



73 MAGAZINE 



UT-1 

Portable Tune Up Meter wrth cables to pfug into Motor oia. 
Link, GE, Standard, etc. This unit gives you the meter 
functions of the radio being tested. It also operates as a 
portable dc voltmeter with the following full scale ranges: 
1.5, 5, 15, 50, 150, 500, 1 KV with a special 3 volt range for 
GE Progress Line equipment. The UT-1 can be set zero center 
for discriminator readings. Also featured in the UT-1 is a field 
strength meter. Place your order now. Kit form $42,50. Wired 
$49.95, Extra cables of your choice (specify rig) . $5.00 ea* 

($2.00 for postage and handling^ 



. * * * w ^ 



«UJt DiL.iiiiiii 
■t'l 



TESCO-PAD 

The 'TESCO-PAD'' has no 
tuned coils to go off frequency, 
no tuning necessary or even there! 
It's all m one "Bfack Box LC." 
ready to go. The "TESCO-PAD" 
has a 1 second hold-up for your 
transmitter, complete P.T.T. 
operation, avail able with dual 
audio output levels, 12 or 16 tone 
combinations. 

KIT $34.95 $39.95 Wired 

(Add $1.00 for 16 tone version) 
($2.00 for dual output version) 

(Add $ LOO for postage and handling J 







H^aller Electronics - Test Equipment Sales 

P.O, Box 9913, Chevy Chase, Md. 20015 Telephone: 301-652-0996 



Tyg^a 



Computer Keyboard Terminals 

New terminals include 88 character 
EBCDIC keyboard, I.C. decoder & 
control boards, display with 3 digit 
numeric readout and alpha numeric 
Burroughs readout 

WERE 125.00 NOW $85.00 

w/schematic while supply lasts! 



\-\ 



R394U 150-174 MHz receivers 
(FM) special $15.00 ea. 

12V 8 amp Power Supply Kits $8.50 

RTTY Polar Relays $1.50 ea. 

New ribbon cable . . . $.20/ft . . . 
$15.00/100 ft (20cond.) 

36 cond ... $.30/ft . ..$22.00/100 
ft 

Super Low CMOS PRICES 



Send for on r FREE 



Surplus E lee Ironies 

10518 Connecticut Ave 
Kensington, Maryland 

20795 



JULY 1973 



111 



I 




-p * 



Numitfon 5V 7*Segment 
SlimHne or Regular $2.50 ea. 




iDinnpinr 



ZM 1 000 Neon $1 .75 

GE Y4075 25V Mmiature 

$1 75 

GE Y 1938 24V Standard 

$1.75 

RAY CK 1905 Standard 

$1.75 

MAN a 1,7V M in fat y re 
>3.50 ea. 10/»30 

GIANT ALPHA NUMERIC 



01 L CAPS 16 MFD 5000 VOLT 
Rare find. $9.00 each 3 $25 OO 



NOISE ACTUATED SWITCH $1.35 
Solid state noi$e actuated wvitch fully lA^ired. 
includes mike pick-up, arnphfier^ SCR swUch. 
Actuates by noise or whistle. Useful for burglar 
alarms, lamp lighter, etc. 15 ft range. 



LIGHT EMITTING DIODES 3/STOO 

Ruby red, gold plated leads. With mercury cell 
for instant testing. 



■ 



B7971 



$1.00 



H.H. SCOTT MULTIPLEX 
Solid state brand new multiplex module w/ 
schennatic. PossibiHty of conversion of various 
mono sets to stereo. $3.00 each 1 for $25.00 



Alpha-numeric keyboards. Excellent to new in condition. Styles may vary slightly 
from picture. Two models available, one with ASCI I encoder in base $55.00 postpaid 
in the U.S. Keyboard with r^o encoder in base $35.00 postpaid in U.S. 



KEY BOARDS 
$35.00 & $55.00 




RCA MEMORY STACK 32x32x9 

3rd generation, ultra compact. Maasurts 1x4 
1/4x7. Brand new. $50.00 3 for $125.00 



CORE STACK 

Late model memorv stacks, unused, 

.50.00 
.40.00 
.60.00 



V # **■■■■ 



2Kx9. 
8K 4 bit Y-ptane , 
16K 4 bit Y-plane. 
147K stack 




AM-FM RADIO $20.00 

Fuliy built chassis by Detmonico with 
front panel, solid state. Also has stereo 
tape and stereo turntable inputs, 1 15 VAC 
power. Brand new with schematics. 
$20.00. Made for console installation. 
Cost over $100.00. 



URC-11 WALKYTALKY 



MC 2 way radio, hand held, 
measures 3x4 inches. Used for 
survival in downed aircraft. May 
be converted for other frequen- 
cies. URC-11 $15 each or 3 for 
, . , . , $40.00 





12VDC 3 AMP POWER KIT $5.00 

Just right for powering car tape deck, CB 
sets, car radio, etc. from regular house 
current. We furntsh parts — transformer, 
Silicon bridge, filtering caps, directions. 
All new parts, order #KT-3 at $5.00 ea or 
6 for $25.00 




/SEGMENT LED 

Hobby craft due to being factory rejects* Most 
have a segment or decimal inoperative. Still a 
great "buy" for the experimenter. What an 
unusual tie clip you can make with pocket 
battery . . . demo displays, etc* In many appli- 
cations you don't need full 7 segments, $1.00 
each or $10 the dozen, 0.333 inches high 
character. 



GIANT 7 SEGMENT 

As above only this one is the giant display 
13/16 inches hgt of character. First time 
offered and as far as we know, offered nowhere 
else. This one is quite an attention getter. Also 
available in this giant display nun>eraf "one" 
with "plus" and "minus" sign. Again, these are 
rejects. Giant display/ $1,50 each 12 for $15,00 



extra on above. MESHNA PO Bx 62 E. Lynn Mass. 01904 



J 



112 



73 MAGAZINE 




COMPUTER KEYBOARD W/ENCOOER |35 

Another shipment just received. Alpha-numerics 
keyboard excellent condition. Once again we 
expect an earJy selfout. Price of $35 includes 
prepaid shipment in the US and shipment made 
within 24 hours of receipt of order. 



POWER TRANSFORMER 

1 1 5ac/1 2V@3 amps . . . $2.50 



IC SPECIAL - ONE MONTH ONLY 

Our regular SI 5 IC board with approx. 140 DIP 
ICs on them, with ident sheet. For one month 
only we are pricing ihem at S6.50per board to 
reduce our inventory . ^CS $6.50 Or 5 for $25 



COPPER CIRCUIT BOARD 

Brand new GE 2-s(ded glass epoKy G*10, the 
standard of the industry, bright ar>d shiny new. 
6x12, $1.00. 12 X 12, $1.50. 



POWER AMP TRANSFORMER 

Brand new compact, regular 115 V 60 cycle 
input. Output of 40 VCT at 4 amps plus 
another winding 6V at 2.5 amps. Fine business 
for Power Amps, Logic or Op Amp supply. 
$5.50 each or 5 for $25.00 



12VCT2AXFMR$150 

Regular 115 volt 60 cycle input. 12 volt 
transformers are always in demand, these are 
brand new. $1.50 each or tO for $12.00 



AM-FM RADIO $5.50 

Due to the West Coast ship strike they came in 
too fate for the customer. Now it's your 
bargain. Use it as is or build it into your own 
cabinet, desk, wall, etc. All built, ready to use. 
With AC supply. To make it portable all you do 
is power it with a couple of "D'* cells. Fully 
assembled solid state chassis with AC power 
supply, less speakers. Covers full AM as well as 
FM broadcast. The price. • .an astounding 
meager $5.50 




PISTON CAPS 1-8 mmF 
3 for $1.00 



Unused Military surplus. For hi freq. work. List 
price over $3.00 each. We have 1 size only, 
1— 8/iF. No hardware. 
#73-18 3 for $1.00 



60-SECOND TIMER 

A bonanza for the photo lab or any require 
ment for a prectston spring-wound ttmer. May 
be set at any interval 0—60 seconds. Contacts 
rated at 15 amps. Contacts close while running 
and open at end of time interval. Brand new. 

$1.50 each, 10 for SI 2 



455 KG IF ASSEMBLY 

Complete miniature 455kc I F. amp assembly. 
1.5 inches Jong, little over Vi inch square. Ready 
to use w/schem. Sim to Miller 8902 ..... 2,50 



RF VACUUM 
SWITCH 



Made for the 
good for 10Q wa 
no doubt handles 
rrtore due to being 
der rated for the mili- 
tary . . . #71 17 3/2.00 




ART 13 ^/:^^^^^ 

es much ^M?r^^ ^ 

eina un- ^P^*^' ^^ 






7400 SERIES IC GRAB BAG 

Mix of 7400 series DIP, unmarked untested. 
Some schematics provided .....,, 10 for 1.00 

100 for 8 00 
1000 for 60.00 






BATTERY ELIMINATOR- 
CHARGER 

Plugs into 115 volt 60 cycle and puts out 
approx, 12 volts DC 100 mils. Sufficient to 
power most any small transistor radio and also 
useful for charging small dry cells and small 
ni cad cells. Fully built, ready to use- 
Si .00 each, 6 for S5.00 




GIANT LED 83d 

Price break at last on these giant LED with 
1,000,000 hours of life. Measure full 1/4 by 1/4 
inch. First time offered. 

RED $1.00 

GREEN 1.25 

SUPER BRIGHT coflimated RED with para- 
bolic reflector, measures 3/16 diameter. A real 
hj-intensity red visible over 100 ft, 

SUPER RED Si. 25 



Postage extra on above. MESHIMA PO Bx 62 E, Lynn Mass. 01304 



MARCH 1973 



113 



1 



f 



COMPUTER 

KEYBOARDS 

50 postpaid 




Just arrived, a superb batch of brand new keyboards still in original 
manufacturers cartons. Beautifully finished in pastel colors with contrasting 
colored keytops. Made for table operation with fully enclosed metal cabinet. 
Two encoder boards mounted inside the cabinet with connections terminat- 
ing on Spectra flat cable with plug. Key operation with bounceless magnet 
reed switch action. These computer keyboards were dumped as surplus by 
one of America's largest electronic companies and we were lucky enough to 
be on the receiving end. The price of $50 includes prepaid insured shipment 
In the US and shipment same day as order received. Orders out of the US 
require an extra $2.00. 



LOGIC 

POWER 






( 



10 




With 400 of these power supplies on hand, we figure we'd better sell them 
cheap and get them off the floor or all will collapse with a great crashing roar 
and land in a heap in the cellar. 

These are from computer power supplies, used, good condition. Operate 
from standard house current. 4 output voltages .... MINUS 30 Vdc at 1 Amp, 
PLUS30 VdcatVa Amp. PLUS 10 Vdc at 1 Amp, MINUS 10 Vdc at Va Amp. 
Solid state construction with harmonic regulation on the transformer and 
transistor regulation on the 10 volt outputs. This is one helluva bargain and 
worth buying just to scrap for parts (if you're crazy enough to tear it apart). 
You've got 2 transistorized zener regulated plug-in boards with sockets and 
by changing the zener you can regulate from zero to 25 volts, 2 husky filter 
caps {18,000 juf at 35 volts), power transistors on heat sinks, a nice 
transformer, and misc. other parts. 

Ship. wgt. 37 lbs (you pay shipping) $10.00 each or 3/$25.00 



yffesna^ 



Postage extra on above. MESHNA PO Bx 62 E. Lynn Mass. 01904 



114 



73 MAGAZINE 




wp^" F"*^ ^ ^^ J%^ i 



■ h 1 h 
t {] 'it 










PAY TV 

ASSEMBLY 

$15.00 




A "Super Value" for the gadgeteer, A complete Pay TV installation made for ZENITH 
and all in original packing (3 cartons — wgt 36 lbs) and all unused. Operates on regular 
115 volt 60 cycle power- A wealth of parts, easily removed due to long leads on 
components, most over one inch long. The 3 units consist of Translator, Adapter, 
Decoder, Transistors, tubes, solid state bridge power supply, geared clock motor, 35mm 
geared transport, time recorder, solenoid, relays, hundreds of small parts such as resistors, 
caps, etc. Our estimate as to cost to Zenith, approx $1,000 per set. Schematics with each 
purchase. One set of 3 units $15,00 wgt of 36 lbs. Special ... 3 sets $35 wgt of 106 lbs. 
All unused, original boxed. 






COOLING FAN 
BARRAGE 

$12.00 

For the photo enthusiast, electronic industry, people cooler, etc. Brand new assembly 
made by HOWARD Industries, 3 fans per panel, 115 volt 60 cycle. Each fan good for 100 
cfm and have blade guards both sides of each fan. To reverse flow of air, mount panel 
backwards. All brand new, ready to use- Silver gray panel finish. Standard 19 inch panel, 
5 1/4 inches high, $12 per panel of 3 fans or 2 panels of 6 fans for only $20, Ship wgt 7 
lbs per panel- 

AM-FM STEREO RADIO $18.00 AS IS 

THESE ARE FACTORY REJECTS TAKEN OFF THE LINE FOR REWORKING BUT 
THEN THE FACTORY CLOSED. We have UNUSED Solid State AM-FM radios with 
built in AC supply, extra outlets for tape, mike, or turntable. We furnish the schematic. 
These units made for console installation. Each with minor defects but we can furnish 
most any part found defective. 



Postage extra on above. MESHNA PO Bx 62 E. Lynn Mass. 01904 







MARCH 1973 



115 



■i 



Ulebsber 

radio I 

WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ITEM A DEALER CAN SUPPLY? 



1 



o 




ffWfl© 




addition to quality merchandise and fair prices Larry Webster offers 
FR&E SERVICE FOR ONE FULL YEAR ON ANY RIG YOU BUY 
DURrPJSsJUNE. 

problems with a rig you buy from Webster Radio send it 

!C^f>>Vije will repair it and send it back to you prepaid via 

'teifeND'*'€£)ST TO YOU. Naturally, this service guarantee is 

rig. 

nth's specials at Webster Radio: 




Most important of all, if you buy this month you get the free one year 
service on your rig. We have many other great special values! Call now! 

2602 E. Ashland, Fresno, CA 93726 

Calf: (209)224-5111 

\\ P.S. WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE USA FREE VIA UPS 



BankAmericaro 



^i!;**^.^/*it 




116 



73 MAGAZINE 



m sTOck $Hitn,\G tHMP^m 

IW.i> ^ F^l KilVCO - ;i,7:i l«J Ualn: - i;i1-tT5 SmZ irifm ni,ii,idirrcii»nflt 

IFitUi - I FOLK - [Ip |.i*J IJB Cainl Ul HW**fr - m^ - h lUi im"= 'J Dll .... 

AM ft? ~ m MOlilli; - :i nii (lain! Fihrr^laM. Rmif ur Tniiik 

.1 SiT- M " II ELEMENT T AGJS - I -12 Ull i;jiiii! - (jiti b.- V^rtiriilly l\ilarlii«i $\73S 

A i f 7 22 - ? owl: ^f\ e:KS - j ( h m ^ ; « ^ J iwr* s 1 4 iw^sx im\ \ \i » itt|ii,^ 1 ^ >; ui Wm^Kkx ... *4^^ri^i 

U\ 120 - 20 KLEMJAT UV-AttR^VS - I4J llti Caiti! - i:.*ml.inr the B*M V^i «nd f:r>hrnjr 
t'lMtiirr*. - Can llr St^ikr^H Ip lii a« i-ikmotl* t>yiuifitrtc f** r>\'rnp And >WMtt»<i4iiMV! , , , Sl*'J,rNH 

4.SA. >^Oit aniHSTE tiSB-CKAFT CATALOC. ,, AM \ JU H, CGHMERCiAL CB 



T 










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Omatiitty 
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T4II6 


jfiO 


37 


.54 


31 


149Q 


JUS 


.90 


.75 


.70 


7491 


L4« 


L4t 


134 


137 


7492 


.fiS 


M\i 


.n 


.70 


7493 


^s 


.aa 


.73 


,70 


7tM 


1.32 


I.26 


t.20 


1.14 


7495 


1.3a 


L26 


t.20 


1.14 


7496 


1.32 


i.ifr 


1.20 


1.14 


74100 


I.BCJ 


1.70 


l.6(F 


1.50 


74104 


.70 


,67 


.64 


.6J 


71I0S 


.70 


,67 


.64 


.61 



74107 
74 m 
74122 
74123 
74141 
74145 
74150 
7415! 
74(53 
74154 

7 i I r»gi 
74156 
74157 
74158 
74160 
74161 
74162 
74J63 
74164 
74lMt 



.54 
.60 
,74 
1.30 
1.75 
130 
2_CKI 
J30 
K70 
2.75 

1.56 
L46 
1.56 
1.56 
2.20 

2.20 
2.20 

2,30 



*5I 
37 
.71 

L2fF 
1.66 
1.43 
iJtS 
1.24 
130 
23S 

I.4M 
139 

1.18 

2.10 
210 
2J0 
2.10 

23(» 



.18 
34 
.68 
1.10 
1.57 
1.36 
1.70 
1.18 
130 
235 

1.12 
[31 

2.00 
2.0(^ 
2.00 
'i.OO 
2.00 
2f0 



,45 
31 
.63 
1.00 
L48 
L29 
135 
1.12 
1.40 
2.05 

1.35 
133 
131 
131 
1.90 
t.90 
L90 

i.yo 

1.90 
2.00 



Amy 

Qu4SM UtTt 






^Itfhber 
7417^ 

74ltiO 
74181 
74182 
74192 
71193 
71198 
74199 



r4?iiio 

71S0I 
74S03 
71504 
74S05 

ri.soa 
:tso9 
risio 

74S 15 
74S20 

74S21 
71822 
74S40 
74S50 
74S5 1 
74S60 
74S64 
74S65 
74S73 
74574 

74^107 
74SU2 
74S114 
74s 140 



Ni:50|\ 
NE526A 
NK531V 
NE536T 
^E540T 
SE540T 
NE550A 
^F355V 
NS556V 
\555BV 

VE56flS 
NE36m 
NT562fi 
NE565.4 
?iE566V 
M:567% 
N5niA 
N.^595\ 
N5596A 
709V 

TlOA 
?ll,\ 
7234 
733 A 
1A\\ 
747A 

74av 

LM3S5 
yi336 
1^337 



W9 

2.00 
1,30 
r»,20 
t.26 
2.10 
2. JO 
3J0 
3 JO 



W9 

1.90 
1,23 
4.90 
1.19 
2.00 
2.00 
2.95 
2.95 



|0(Ht 
vp 

1.H0 
L16 
4.6<} 
1.12 

f on 
2_ati 



<;010rnL> TTL 



38 34 
Jtll 34 



311 

1.00 

1.00 

38 

38 

38 
,88 
.88 

.88 

,HR 

1,00 

.OR 

,88 

.88 

.88 

38 

132 

132 



31 
.95 
.93 
.84 

.84 
.8-1 
.84^ 
.HI 

.R4 
34 
,95 
34 
J4 
.84 
34 
34 
1.73 
1.73 



.79 
*79 
,79 
,90 
.90 
.79 
.79 
.79 
.79 
.79 

.79 
.79 
.90 
.79 
.79 
.79 
.79 
.79 
1.63 
ij63 



tJS 1.73 1.63 

132 L73 1.63 

132 1.73 1.63 

1.00 ,95 .90 

IJ?iE\tt IC"S 



2.99 
3..';9 
3.81 
IM 

Itn 

4.4W 
AM 
IJO 
2.10 
KOO 

337 
337 
337 
3J7 
3J7 
337 

.90 
3, to 
i,fl7 

.50 

,50 

.55 
1.00 
1.90 

J5 
IJO 

.60 
2.85 
335 
i,05 



232 
3.3B 
3.5a 
trJfl 
2.25 
4.20 
1,2.? 

\m 

1.95 
35 

336 
336 
336 

3.36 

3.36 

336 

36 

3 20 
1,77 

37 

.47 

LSO 

32 

1.04 

.57 
272 
166 
3,70 



2,66 
3.1T 
3.36 
6.45 
2.10 
3.92 
1.16 
1.00 
L80 
,90 

3.15 
3J5 

3.15 
3.1s 
3.15 
3.13 

.82 
3.00 
1.66 

.44 

.4^1 

.49 

.00 

1.70 

.49 

.98 

.54 

2.6t 

3.46 

331 



990 

1.70 

\,m 

4,30 
1.05 
1.80 
I. HO 
2.65 
2.6S 



.75 

.75 

, J .J 

35 
35 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 

.75 
,75 
35 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.73 
.75 
1.54 
134 

134 
134 
134 

35 



2.49 

2.95 
3J4 
632 
t.95 
334 
1.09 

,93 
135 

35 

2.94 
£.94 
2,94 
2-94 
Z.9\ 
2.94 

,78 
230 
K56 

31 

.41 

.46 

35 

1.60 

36 

.92 

31 

235 

337 

331 



t«A%SlST«a?« \ND DIODES 



IN270 
m9l4 
|N4fiai 
IN 1002 

i^4t)*^3 

|^4<M>6 
ieV747A 
IN75SA 

SN386a 



JS 


J4 


.13 


J2 


JO 


.09 


.08 


.07 


.10 


.09 


,08 


.07 


.11 


.10 


.09 


.08 


.13 


.12 


.11 


.10 


.15 


Jl 


.13 


.12 



ttini 
35 



.22 .19 



.25 .23 .21 



16 

,1'J 



\\\ ICV »iT .wpjtlird III H-. Hh-, or 24— piti Ulf ir^u*lHiti-litir> |ili*lir %w ccmak (u^liAfr 
wxf^t for >vE5.T6. \F340, uhI ^54l» iihirb rfOH- in TO -5 p»-kj|(r. % iilt^ec K^f^tjinfm 
n n . .'i . i . V13,36 .Ad I M ^ 37 «v sppliKl m TO-3 (IHBHiad ) p vk^r • 



1# |;i*« FKEE ilila ali«i«'L« v^tm tt^^a/rA, wa hJl for llrrw Amta ikprU lh«E %n«i \EED, r««s 
(nt Ufivre lmir4 li"* Oul ftmt mrr nnt buvinc. 



^ 



LED r-SEGMLM DISPLAY: 



Stitr ^iluiui ha^ niitir r i paiiJril it'i fikr of LED 0ufl*yf lOid iiMa nidhi^vd iKni 
cocf. Ttir (tilloiniK miw now Avuialilf trata tea «I iki^ 



1^19 


50-99 


100-499 


500-999 


1300 up 


•1.50 


435 


3.75 


3.40 


3.00 


4.7S 


4.50 


4.00 


335 


3.25 


4.50 


4.25 


3.75 


3,40 


3.00 


7.7S 


7.50 


7,00 


6.75 


6.50 


7.7S 


730 


7*00 


6.75 


6.50 


3.50 


3.25 


3.00 


2.75 


2.50 


3.50 


3,25 


330 


2.7S 


2.30 


3.00 


2.75 


2.50 


2.25 


1.90 



SSS I 

SSS-IC 

SSS.2 

SSS^3 

SSS-4 

SSS+7 

SS$-9 

M inilrAii« * 

Thm SSS^J iwi SSS'9 «it live iruratuofi ,33 ill rlu.rAfln' lin||lil T-Scf^mit Mhd cnrrSow 
difliby w!iintft i*iir. wiHi dfrimal poial oa Ihr Irfl tatd wi<l«^ ^'^^ virviiif. Thf SSS-L 
■■d .^SS2 mM%^ tfatf^ sUBT |ik«Mcil dinHTOniMs Ms ih^ .*^^-7 HwJ Sk^9 wtlli wrrrtfied ^fr 
tiad iJijEfitf^ t'lM^n' nirmit rrquiririTki^nl, Hi*' £^^5- EC t^ tlir ume Mi IhrSSS-l rmi-rpi ii ha» 
■ colua itudrjid tti 4 dccktuil puint. ipakjn^ it idrd fnf nir m 1 d^(al tiork. THr :fSS-3 
mmA .^S-4 an- tht new p^i .77 in rlunrter liH|rlji 1 .^t^ifntmi mdl orn-flow dufitflir 
fm|i#«-lhfdy< wilJi ikriaid p<Mfit na tlir fij^l utd rrtdAhM'} uji Ei» 40 fnrl. *A1mi iftr|ddc4 
.ibntp in 4 1)1*%* mtiicr^l prif p nn mr I nrwidesr*'nt 7'Sr^kf<nl [it-cplay. 

Pftrka^f at 8, 1/4 wdtt tf^frpni liimitng; r^tiiylnrii. » . , . . SO.30. 



MOl.KN ir. SOCKET PINJhj < '-^^ tlii-w wmrnf^uii-fll 1111111 iimirjid of .^^td^nrtg yiwir IL'n to 
Vl[ biturdji. 5uld in raiiliiviiJU'^ 4n^iu m iiiuUiplcp, at 100 piitP cutiy. 

300 fDrt2.60 400 r^r 13.40 

700 far 15.80 BOO for |6,60 

earli addilJApal 1, 000 $730 



100 for 11.00 
500 fuf $ 1.20 
9 00 fnr S7.40 



200 fui-|L80 

600 fnrS5.00 

1000 rflrS8.20 



Utul-iii-liiH* !^Oi:ii£T!i. Bnnd iiev with ^d p4ite^ pii 



1-49 50-99 100-499 Sff-999 J.000 op 



14 rim 


16 Pill 


14 Pill 


16 Pin 


14 Pin 



) 



VI' 



16 Ftn 



> 



V»p 
Oused-EBtj]^ 






30 
35 
.55 

.05 
.05 



3S 

.50 
.30 
.55 
.03 
.OS 



30 
35 

.45 
30 
34 
34 



3S 

39 
.40 
.45 
.04 
34 



.25 
.30 
30 
35 
.03 
.03 



STANCOH TKVIMSFORMKHSt IiIkjiI fnrti.^ with \M m^nr^ 



P^81«0, 253VCT. 1 inip . . 
P.6Tni. ft.rn'CT. 1.2 mm.. 



*|>JiJ4ri*« 



■ 1' i- -I '■ 






BEAT SINKS: W»krfH4t! mnm 680 rirruLt boirif cwtlm. t!4" faijgli mkth m diwpilikiii up 
to 20 in iAtm l)f .^fiied (oi lur with TO— 3 packagr. 

1-49 50-99 100-499 500-999 lOOO no 



T\ci«' 680^133 A 130 



1.10 



LOO 



.90 



.80 



AIXES ' BR A DLEY .WL-CB A t> t i,'VbjBdJ ftE.^I5T0RS. \bj af a»r 8t >1 VMURO 
IO»tdtir»lfwvS.7nt»32MQ44«rH WATT. EACH ...3^05, 



(u1:H \HI<. Ol.SLCAP.AOTORS. Ttp«'5G.\ I1IH*»\ Dts 

5. 7 .'. [iK IZ 15. 2a 22, 25. 27. 30. 33, 39. 341. 56, 68, 75. 82. [00. 1 20, ISO, 180, 2O0. 
220. 250, 270. 300. 330, 360. 390. 470. 500, 360, 680^ 730. 820. KMHi, 1200. 1500. 
IIMKI, 21 MH). 2200. Z^m, 27rMI. 3000, 3300, 3WHJ, 17mi. 5410«tij:J^\ 

aoi^l'. EACH tJl 0.02^F. EACH |.12 



LOW VOi.TAriE DISCS. Typp UK. 

1.%F. 3V . „„.,..$. 25 0.47vE.3V 
Jjut\ lOV .., , $.12 23^F. 3V 



135 0.3^F, lOV .....,....$.20 
t.30 O.OI^jF, 16V 1.10 



£LECT1t01.YT1C CAPAOTORS: All %i^e* trr nMHahlf in bmh. Mxid r» upri^t fpT. 
Btmti) ntciuBt. Pirjjc KfidarMr vourr rlwiicc 

....f.lO iflfcjF. 35V ......... 130 S^F. SOV ,.^,.......1.10 

.. .I.to S(|jlM5% ......... 130 tC*;F.50V .in 

,...$.10 1II0^K.33V.. ,130 2«|iF, SOV ,.,,,t.20 

]01|iF.l5V. .t.tO SOOtPSSV „,.t.40 51^ F, 50V .,_„,,, .1.20 

22Hjr.*i5V ,.^,,...$,15 lOOOp,, 35V .,_.,. f.50 IOM^.54)V .„ §.:»> 

50l|iF. 15V... 130 liiF.iOV . f.io 2iXHiF.34JV ..f,40 

iOOOuF. 15V ,_.... 130 ^F,50V, ,„.,J.10 50CI^F.50V ........,$,55 

2C|jF,3SV 1.15 3*iF.50V_ . t.lO 



IC^jF, 15V ._ 
3l*iF. i5V ... 
5«4iiF. i5V 



TKRMSi R4tf*<J flrrns NET 30 djivs. Oihn-tot!* ch«-<<k ar isiohv otrfrr with older. 
tLaiik,i\iiirrit'ard and >1anlrn-hir|rp wrr wrlrnine. AH uirriirii^ t^ now done hy roRiputcr 
IlirrrfniT^ tlw (lAUtwUt^ Mlatifjant rliirgen will liiiiUKiiJitit'all}' be iddnil to ytlUr ordtT. 

' SPFCtAL CHARGES 

tl.Oi} COD tl.00 iidditionjf 

10.75 AirM.a 10,50 

la Sit Pb^l^ liminni-r 10.25 

lass £p«ul Ddaien ia75 



I 0.00 I 499 
I 5.00*12499 
I 2S.00-W9.99 

$ 50.1*0- fW.VK? 

fl(Hi.0O «d HP 



■dd 

>dd 

Mid 

<dd 

juid 



Additioiul 
Additkiful 
HiiidiLioajl 



Willi Ihift MFw f^tilmi jIt JiifErr»r-ntp will br F.O.B. dntnutictft. «■ Fint 
Clt iHdr f hkn^], TW^ ckax{pp« inrliiid^ ^ilippine. li.tfidl|Bf «id ias 



UPS 



^H^StilHI KK^lDEStS: PIpm^ mM 4W nl#« uac 




mim siTAiri sisiij-m, mc 



p. O ftOX 773 • COLUMBIA, MISSOURI 65201 
TWK 91^760-^453 • PHOHl 314-443-3673 



BANKAlVllfllCARD 



y/Y^M*??^*? 



ORt>ER UF3K 
1^00^25.2981 
1-800425-2595 




JULY 1973 



117 



■■■■I 









14 

5t 



i^26 



th 






^?!^^A^ r>>^Sr*:^: > !!":^<N^ tt: V 



'^'^Y^.'%%- 






0^>j 















s* K^S- 



' Anniversary Sale 



'^ M' 






i^>^. 



C & H SALES CO 



'Sir'" 






■i^. 












:,J»*.*"«- 



'■^^.TV : *" .■^ 



■T. - 






-^=>-.^ 






■^ -.-« ■.^;^. 



INFRARED IMAGE tUBE, Nawr modd. Thii is 
■^^ Fttrnswonh or RCA mai^ufaciur^ lute =6032- lE 






^^ RBCfurgwbtA ihoasartdi of timet. Alk^lin^ florage feffttefY wfth iimattl a:^ ** * ^^^r model Vt\^n the 1P2S, Potential ^^ould be 
•^ ' FMatet. Flat valt^e curve durif*g discharge. Will ho^d diarge fof kmg * "':^ approK. 20.000 V. fas ccwrfiBred to 5,000 f(K 
^^ period of tffiw. High diichaj-g* rate. Spill prcx>f, may be used m any , i**25i Sue ^ 4 1/2^' lonj, 2" dianwief ai ils widest 






p«itioa U sei potassium hydrcmkffl = (30% etectrotrte) 



<IVJ:. point. Slock *OL333& 






-S1Z50 







,:^.'i>S>5^>:3i 






*■ -» - ^ w-» - 



2 4mp^ hours, 1.2 volK, 4 oil size - 1 3/8" ic 
11/16" % 4 1/T6" militarv surplus— used good 
condition. Pnce , Sl,95 



r^^^i^^i?^^?:;?^^ 







JJh^. 3 an^ houri. T.2 volts, 6 oz. si^e = 1 7/8*' x 1/T' x 
;i5>^ 6'' rniStarv ajfplus-used good condition. PHceSZ25 






?^ -.* * 



i^ 














U^. NAVY SIGNAL SHUTTlH, Shutter t% nvi^n^^^K 
ted tsehind 12" dtame^r ptaie glass. Wonderful 7>^ 
mjveltv item for boat, beach house or den Stock "^^ 
^MI7706 . _ $6.96 ^^ 

STEPPiNC SWITCH. 24 VOC 20 ohm coil, T.25 amp cotl. 12 level 2 '?* 

brg. 10 r>on bT*g, 11 steps, contacts are Ptiosphor-aronze, inien-upier zl 

1C oft nofmai 2C. Drmen: ovefall length 4 t/2", width 2 3/4" iteprh 2 ^^ 

; 3/8". MFG. CLARE CORP. MODEL 211 Stoci? ^RL90a7 . . .'. il2.9S/^ 



r^ 



4 anp hourly 1 .2 volts, 6 oz. size = 1 7/8'' x T/2" x 
6" miliTary surpltjs-used good condition. Price S2 SO 



t^-'vuTv WESTERN ELlCTl^IC AUTOIWATIC STEPPING 

^V7>; SirtrtTCH. 12V.D.C. 3 level. 10 steps and off with 

^^ ■ s^ond coil to reset. Slock £RL9038 , . . . $1Z50 










dia. Stock i*TD7507 



S8.95 XA 



f9feS 



20 amp hours, 1,2 volts 2 1/Slb. size -3 1/8" « {'^ M^^.r^Mc-r^o ..... -f^^-^* -^^ ■ ...x. 

VI 6" K 8 1/4" military surplus-used good condi- ^^^?1 MAIVOMETtR, WELL TYPE, Made by Trtmount 

tion. Price $5,95 V-^^ Jn't* Co. p2236 to 30 inch. 1/10 subdivisions. 

^&s^ Cari be used wnti oil mertury or water. Dimen- 

' ^.^^■c-^S^i<^dJ:^^>r^^--^^-Kl^^^ tVi^^^kJ ^^*"' "" '''*" '^ ^ ^ 1/2^ Stock 
^^^iX^iS*^^'^^*^^^^ -- ^ $47.50 

iSf NOT PLATE, 1 15 Volts. 2000 watts, Dimenston$: .^^^^^^i?%:^' " " ^'A>*^:S<^;\-r:\^^-r^'5^^^ . 

g? S 1/2" diameter by 1 3/4" thickness. Stock ^^^^V S^Wm^"^ ^-^^^^^if^t-Jl^-^^^^^^^ 



w^^ 



g^fifTsaoi2 



S4SB 








V^^;l^^^^^^X^^:%N^i^>rw*s^r^j^^ 



QUARTZ REFLECTfVE HEATER. 400 watts. A"^ 
1 10 voHs. The unit is mounted m a large heat sink. '^?^: 
Dimensions: 2" height, 3" width, length 14 T/2". Z'^i 
Stock «TS8015 ....... „ S4.95 ,<^i^ 



§ 










.>0'i, I 




OPTICAL PROVING ftJNG, capacity 6000 fbs. :j> 
Mfg. by SteeJ City Testing Machine Inc. ModeJ *^ 



PV 123. Stock STD7509 



'■■ A ■■ A M 



,.SidS.oo 



H-* 



.^:^.S:^^r 



wrjw 



^^^ AIRCRAFT CAMERAS, TYPE K.17. with 9" x 9^ 



^-JX forrtwt. COMPLETE WITH ASA MAGAZINE 6 
^, f±. WIDE ANGLE 






:;>! t/6 metragon. Stock *0L3321 

^i 24" F.L., m. Stock SOL3322 . . . . 

^L 63B intervalometer, Siock «OL3323 



S115.D0 
S12S.O0 
. 520.00 














OPTICAL PROVIAJG RING, capwirv IJO.OOOlbs. 
MIg. Steel City Testing Machine Inc. Model PV123 
Stock =TD 75 10 S275.00 




^-'^'^^?^<^55r3^S^f?^S^i?^ 



1% 






OPTICALLV PERFECT GLASS DOME, Built to ^o^^ 
strmgent Government specs, for 3irt:raft optical "^^ 
applications. Glass 3/16"" thick, opbcaOy polished 
both surfaces. Metal rim has t8 mouminq holes. 

Stock =rOL333i S4aoo^f>^^;^ 

Si f^OLAROlD FILTER, 6" diamet^. laminated in glass, red in cdor ^vC 
^- Stock ffOL334! 






^v: 








-t n ■*■"• • 



1.^.-t 



T30 MICROPHONE. Carbon type. 75 ohm 50 db^^^ 
below ! mv, fim response with PL 291 2 contact "4 
male plug. It" cord. Unused, Stock =MI7778 S1.S0 % 



. . $4.95 f:^ HS 30 HEADSET, 250 ohm impedance ~ Hearing 
i-^w-v^i'-"'- ^'^ ^^^' ''^' weight headband 9*^ cord w/spade 

^ ■^ ^'SJ IlltfK that uire inty^ m CfSJI i.^»r#j t^- Annrt ^i 



>^;DICHROlC BEAM SPLITTING MIRROR 80% trans miss!ofy 4*' h^ fi ^*^^ ^ 

^; 1/2- by US" t^H:kness. Brand New Surpl^, ^k^SS^ sS'J '^^ '"^edance. Unused. Stock =M17779 . 



-$4.95 



^t 
^v^ 




118 



73 MAGAZINE 










.<^v-»*^isC^,>^^;^. 




Jim. ' •^•- "Si 













feel- Manufactured by the Aerosonie Corp. Condi T-Vvy J 
lion: used oood. Stock =MI7781 ', : . S49.50 r:-?i>v frf 



HIGH PRESSURE TANK. Type A. Rated at 1800 






?SK ir* by 6 172' 
Stock =ACT2I06 < 



?Mf4 




^^'}t^ OXYGEN COfyVERTER. Aircraft Type rattd at 70 
,^*'-^ PS I, 7 liter appfo^. capacity. Slainfesi siecl body. 



1 ' pipe port at lop of lank. «s5 











-—LENS, Mfg. by Pacific Optical Corp. 24" focal 
A>;- rengih, f/4.0, 9*9 forrnai, codted lervs mounted 
;^^ completely with Ins and Shutter, Stock -Ml 778? ^^^^^^^ 

^^^L^^j^. ^ * — - ^ - - ^ - ^ .-..»..*-,..,,*»»», , S1S0.00 ^^^^^^H^ - ^St ii Has 4 ports for inlet, outlet and gauges. Mfr. Aro 
l^">2^iL^<^i%-i<*^^^ ^^F^ ^^.;^.^.r» ^"^^ C°- Measures 9 1/2" H by 13 1/2" dia. Stock 

"m^M^m '^^^^tJK^^ ;,.»^:s^.^K'l<^^^%|^^^cT2107 , saaso 

100 RPM, Mfg. Delco. 27 VDC PM revefsible. -^'^^^^^vl'v^A^^V^ " ^I^- 
governor controJEed. o^erali dinwnsions; 4 !72" ^5^''^ " " " " '"^^ '''^^^^-c:v?>i' 

Jong. 1 3/8" dia., 1/4" shaft. Stock ^DCGM5012 

$15,00 - --- im^^m%i OXVeiN COMVERTER. converts licruid to gas-^ 

sous ox V gen. Aircrafi type wit*i sraif^leis steel ^ 
body. Dim; 8^' H by 11" dia. 75 PSJ, 6 liter 5 
^j^t ^s?--'^ ^coZ\^ir^'~^ ^ ■^■'i^^^'i^'t^'^ T^tL^^A^ ^^ capacity, Corrpletejw«(h regulator smh/^r Mfg. by ^§ 

X^>1 10 RPM; Mfg. G.E., 27 VDC a7 amps, 1 oi.fT. - -- • ^ _ . . . . 

\^^ torque. Dimensions 3 7/8" long. 1 3/8" dia.. 1/4" 
*^n' shaft. Stock stDCGM5013 ..,..*....... SIO.OO 



T 1- -i » 



9 » T -■■ ■! 






^ 120 RPM 



Mfg. Delco. 27 VDC govemor con 
^f troHed, dimensions; 4 1/2" long, 1 3/8" diameter. 

$15.00 



J^^ Stock SDCGM5014 



^ + I V ■■ -% 



c^. ^ '-■ 

















Bendiii. Stock =ACT2103 



S4950S55 






.-k -^. 



C^JW; VICKERS HVDRAULJC MOTOR, displaces .095 
^^^^ cu-in. per revolution, dejivers 2.5 GPM at 6060 
RPM, Power is 4,5 HP output at 300D PS 
Produces 45.5 in. Ibis, of torque. Ports are 5/16" 






'>•-. 



■~^^>!>iSi^fi--^ AN, internal spline is 3/8 inch 

125 RPM, Mfg. D.teo. 27 VDC PM gov.m^^"?^^- ^"' ' ^"- ^">^ "'"^^ " ■ " 
controlEed, reversible. Dimensions; 4 1/2" long, 1 
3/8" dianfwter. Stock -DCGM501 5 S15.00 ^ 



6. Oimen: 2 



tt 



S99.50 









^^^-^ 130 RPM. Mfg. Oster. 28,5 VOC. shunt. S.OOO rpm - '^ --v>-^- 

4 




^T 



v^ ,09 o2.in,right angled gear head^ Dimensions: 
Jv 1/4" long, 2" wide, shaft 1/4" threaded, by 1/2" 
Zi\ log- Stock ^DCGMSOie ....,._, $6.50 



V 



-*" -*..*"5'-* 





v.*,' 



VICKERS HYDRAULIC MOTOR, diiplac^ ^^^ ^' 
cu.in. per revolution, delivers 1.7 GPM at 6060 *pj 
RPM, Power is 3 HP output at 3000 PSI. Produces r^ 
31,1 inJbs. of torque. Ports are 3/8" AN external, \> 
Spline is 13 tooth 7/16", Otmen: 2'\ x 2'\ x 4'\ ^'^i 
Stock ffPC450e '"^ '^*^ 



'Do ,> * 1 • * ■ • « ■ » 4 ■■ ■ • ■ ■ ■«:> ■ « * 41^9?. UU m^ 



1©?- 

.^s 



iC*^ 



FR 5/U FREQ. METER IQ to 100 MC 



*X FR-6/U FREO. METER 100 to 500 MC 



^ 



. . S99.50 -^ ^ 

. , $99.50 ^^ 



M TS323 FREQ. METER 90 to 450 MC 

5S GERTSCH FM'3 FREO. METER 20-640 MC ,001% 



l-Bq|.H>-IP 



LM-10 FREQ. METER 125 Kc to 20 MC S25.00 

$75.00 

.. .$150.00 
^^qT H.P. 21 1A Square Wave Gen. ..............,,,,......,, $99,50 

Je^ H,P, 4106 V.T.V.M ,. .., , , . , , $95,00 

^ TEK 105 Square Wave Gen. . _ ,.. ,..,.,,,,. $49.50 

T^ TEK 110 Pulse Gen. .., « , S75.00 

. . . $35.00 
. . . $50.00 
. . .S99,50 
. . . $50,00 
.,$150.00 
T^rsrSHURE BROS, CM-16C (similar to Shure 488 J har^d held Dynamic 

J^: Mfke 200n New „ , , , , . . S14,95 

:^'^^ AMERICAN ELECTRONICS LABS SNB 243A crystal switch V4.0 



^ TEK 121 Wide Band Pre-Amp S CPS - 12 MHi . 

^ JUST ARRIVED OS 8E/U Scopes 

^# LSiN Deflection Pol Model 8 , . , 

j'i!* SIERRA 121 A Wave Analyser 20 Kc to 500 Kc 
:^ SANBORN 670A XY Recorder i* , 



•?%y 






Inventory close-out 

Variable, voltage-regulated 

DC Power 



->i^ 



G.C. New 



•* ■ -t 



v.^TV'7D/U Mutual Conductance tube checker 
l5? R'77/ARC3 Receiver Hess xtabj 



$14.95 
$19.95 
.59,95 

JjC^RT-17a/ARC 27 225,0 to 339J MC Trammitter may be loi>e 
*^^ modulated at 1020 cycles per secoftd for emergency or direction finder 

'V%«^PUrpOSeS ^ w i k»f*im***m^*mm*rmm---rm*~ ...... *■-■.*. 4***1 ^Ow.tHJ 






whfle stock lasts 



fvlodel 1910 



Brand r^ew made by Wamer-Chilcott Labaratories Instrument 
Division Deltvers a dependable 60-400 VDC at 100 mA or 600 
VDC at 30 mA. with output deviation ol less than T% for line van- 
ations from 105 to 125 V Swilch-seJectable ranges of 0-600 VDC 
or 0-120 mA. Operates on 117 VAC -10*^^. 50/60 Nz, 1 10 W. Size: 
16' wide. 11* deep. 9V4" high Designed tor electro phoresis, bol 



I* 

i 



5^ 







--,'■.*'. 



^^l^' 




^r^2r^.u**^^:?r^, 



^^%/S> 











SALES CO. 



1^3® 



Vt 






^iSKS^ 







■r^V' 




2176 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, California 91107 <:S^li?M 



JULY 1973 



119 



The GAM Line 

Famous for POWER . . . powerful performance, 
VHF/Antennas • BASE/MOBILE 

144 to 160 MHz 





TG-2 



4 



MP-34 




TG-2-R 3.7 db List 

TG-2 3.7 db List 

TG-4-MS 6.7 db List 

IVIP-34 6.7 db List 



$33.00 
$22.05 
$55.00 
$34.65 




TG-4-MS 



TG-3S 

6.7 db 

$72.60 



14.9 db Omni-Directional Gain 

In System Performance 

(Usrng the TG-5S and the TG-4-MS) 
GAIN OVER ISOTROPIC RADIATOR 




TG-5S 

8.2 db 

$10450 




Electronics 



191 VARNEY STREET 
MANCHESTER NH 03102 
TEL. (603) 627-1010 



y 



120 



73 MAGAZINE 



r 



ctxa 




2 H^ffi fM Titftiernref 

ril G Ibc J lAirh huiit ^n at PS} tnd 94 34 S249 9^ 
i?l AcVoWf H SUPPLY S49 95 

(3} 1 1 KlN crv^Tjti vour chniCf (siock liiO St2 DO 

REGULAnsan 90 



iO«rim output GTI tS 





100% AMERICAN MADE 




GTX 



100 channcF camhinatiam, leatufti mclependenl 
sBlecnon 0f traniiTiii and cecerv? lipqueiriciBs. ind 
iiwitch lor prpseltcied pajnnq 

IUGTK?OOrbu»Tf m 0CPSUm}S4 94 S?^ 9S 
m AC POW E n SUPPLY " S49 f S 

1 3J ^ E 4 1 1 4 4 taH V out ctkom I iicck Nfi J SU&t) 

REGULAR S32 190 
OUR SPECIAL MCKAGE PRICE $7S5 9S 



2-Un\ I HF'FM Mttruw Hmlta Tflfplumt'* 



• Suit pi* Ctinvef^ion Tu 
10 Wutt OtilpiJl 

H I GTK 10 I ttttiU m DC PSt inti 34 94 SI99 9S 
fl^ACPOmRSt/PPLV &3fl.9S 

ll) 2 Ei(l4 itiH VDtH Lhflice UTOCk liSl) SlZ-OO 

«1EGULAnS24G9a 

mn sntiM packagi price sraajs 

PUui^^ mU\ SIO 00 SiibsthiiiTing 

HAMPAK foi AC on GT)< lU 

PjCl*9l Wilh HAMPAK and 

AC S73?G0 





^ 



HtmPii 

BdHBry pick Im CTX 10 paildbltopitrAlidfi \J-im 10 
ceUs (nai mciucled} 

S39.9S 
t includes pon^bit iHtt^ftn^. r,mving ft^ifiiffp ^ ffv^e 



INSTALL JT voirsi-:lf: 

(Weather montior and ch^nmfs B + 60} 



<?i> 



% 



* FLASH * FLASH * FLASH * 

Lotjk dt whdt vou gel for FVO REPEAT NO EXTRA 
CHARGE The GTX ? apid GTX 200 have ct %u\}vt 
wn^ihve Oueii Giile Wo?^ Fet pre dmjilifitf BUfLT IN the 
Fi^teiyef Iroflt end tor lutjerti. iea than 2b miuovoU 
^t*f^\-ti!vti:v '''HC SESt receiver now even ti**Tmr' 



30 WATTS OUTPUT. ALL SOLID STATE {no tubes). 
TRUE FM (not Phase modulatton) for superb audio 
qualityvlOchannel^ith 146.94/146.94 mcluded. Three 
pole low pass filler on both transmit and receive. 1 watt 
low power position. Provision for tone encoder. Simple 
internal strapping provision allows multi-channe! use of 
any crvstal. {GTX-2 and GTX^IO) Microphone and 
mobile nrTOunting bracket supplied, Q 10 glas s boards. 

Professional level construction by 
distinguished Avionics Mfg. - General Aviation Elec- 
tronics Inc. The finest amateur FM transceiver available 
at any price. Sf?e: 9x6 1/2 x 2 1/2. Weight 5 lbs. 
Current Drain: Receive: ,09 amps. Transmit: High 5.0 
amps. Low 1.7 amps.* (GTX'2 and GTX 10) 



Full 25 waits power, ALL SOLID STATE I no tubes} 
reliability, 10 channel^ with "2 t/2 pairs of crvsials 
installed for calfmg and dtstress, weather, ship to ship, 
ship lo coast and public and port ope^rations. Self 
eontamed, compact. Pre luned. Vmyf covered umi is 
splash proof — ifnciact, humidity and fungus resistant 
Can be mounted m panet* on bulkhead, on or below 
table top wtih universal mounting bracket included, 
JUST CONNECT TWO WIRES and YOU'RE ready ro 
OFF RATE f 

Optionai Accessories: 

• 3 dB, 6 dB, or 9 dB gam lay down 
gleaming white fiberglass antenna 

• 3 dB sailboat antenna, mounting hard- 
ware and 60' of marine white cable 

• c flannels 6B. 26, 28, 12 

PLEASE WRJTE FOR OUR SPECIAL PACKAGE 
PRICES' 



COMING SOON!!!* Genave Touch-Tone Pad, 

and MUCH MORE. 




r//. 



S(?rvice Manua] 
CX7-C'X7A 
$29.01) ppd. 



REGENCY, CLEGG, MIDLAND. SBE. INDUE, GLADDING. MIIDA, CUSH CRAFT, DATA ENG., BIRO. OLIVER SWAN 
(KLM), TEEC SSTV, HYGAIN, SAVOY. SIGNAL/ONE, B&K, LEADER, MITS KENWOOD. TEMPO, TEN TEC, OX ENG., 
MINI-PRODUCTS. SWAN. ETC.. IN STOCK - PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTE. 



ALPKA 

Atphji-70F>A 70V vapot coo^ccriinMr, 

bfdnd new cond- 
AM£CO 

Tk 62 6 A 2fTvlPf irriim in/€3t VfO^ 
Don ^tUTf 

43 MiaTrnwTVfi tncvtrl Umired quaHtitv 
COL LI MS 

6JS 1 VHF cany. 

*tWiyi-l itvf W/&16F-1 AC and a T7 8-3 

imttUt nt-m asnfi 
gtECG 

TfiQf € aCvt mvA£ mod 
F M 27 A FM Kcwr, iiM r«w 

3B rcvr, 2B0 "0" mult.'ipk 

3 A rcvi ?AQ "O' ' muli/ipk andctL 

M M -2000 nutcNnff rwfwor It 

tmtt conft, in e«rton 

5 WH A 9(p,i. ^^v, fcnrt . tivm Ci*ttd 
GALAXV 

F w 2 r'i^^AC 210 xne. 6 «iai*, wwt 
CL AQDIfSlC 

GlflddmLt"?S w/stafi 24ns, BAf^. 

QAi^A, 27(82^ 2aiS6. and t6T 



n«4 ChirPriC* 
1,??&,00 396 .00 

U9.00 95 00 
B9.00 e& 00 

Sge.OD 435.00 
4 9&00 335 00 



59 OO 39 00 

339 00 2m 00 

! 10.00 179 00 

18900 14d.{K] 

tB9 00 139.00 

4 8900 3^.00 

229 00 199 QO 
199 00 12S00 
199 00 159 00 



6 m Gumm IV 
HALLICRAFTERS 

5FI-1S0 *cw* mtAC/mk 

SX I4««:%f. Ft'SOig^ii, NA I9c«l. 

SR^ ?A 2m tier. ti#M cotid, w^? a £^ 
SR-46 A ti#n xevr rwvy cand. ik^/A « iji& 
HA 266 « 2 VFO 

HEATH 

N X 10 M^rwdci 100 wall SSfl AM mmmtm 

h W 16 Ci^Kvi 30. 4& 1& 

H{^ - lO VFO a&2 nv irti 

SB 1iaA6ffi SSB pcvr Hr5B SOOZm rr^t 

vt4^« fr HF 23A/AC ith«nn^ ch«cMd 

by HMtfi 
SB 500 7rri TrBnlwi.^ lirr 
HD-1 "Q" miiU w/tjuin in ACpi 

se A aoo-^emCuou 

KMICHT/ALLIED 

TH 106 1^ vun 2m nmj w^AC. DC.mc^ 

AX tgoHvn rcvi.ao 10 ^ i^vwv, i icc 

MAG MUM 

T B93, brd'id fi«w, watnifirv 



Aif, Out P^ti^ 




fl:*a Qvf price 




69 00 


NATIONAL 


429.00 




11900 


^X'Scoritf ioMKlwmCXA AC/ipk, 


325.00 






lOOl^ccol 






129 00 


99 00 


NC-IB^iewr 


iiaoo 


^.OD 


3SaO0 249 00 


NCX &MK 11 wwNCX A AC'sfH. lOOKcc* 


45000 


379tJ0 


195 00 


iGd.PO 


SWAN 


229C»0 






SMf 240 */ 1 1 7B AC/m tw*rHl nnM c«ld. 


17900 


U9.00 


11900 


250C em hcvf w/1 1 7XC A^riQk. VOX. 


43000 3eS OD 


109 00 


asoo 


NS-1 niflriepCiHiaii, fffmrCDnd 






39 00 


29 00 


1 17X h.njc AC 
TI»UTEWO 


6S.00 


39,00 






502 S-'l &f35-5S- wait uuipwi 2^ ^mp, tiew 


1 05. OU 


fS .00 


189.00 


11 9 00 


&02B 1 3i'4S 50 HMii miittut tm ♦imp. fiew 


130 00 


99 00 


BdOO 


79iiO 


LW 15*91* Dwr??rTv lo^d tv'Tin^**.^ ■!»•%> 


ITU on 


^00 


t90Q 


29 00 








439 00 329 00 


TC1Q224h^ D-9t3Jftcieii^«iH» 


0900 


5900 






TEST EQUIPMENT 










E)CO 37S L Jb dudiO 9*^' v I'ke ii««» 


s9oa 


39 DO 


129 00 


€9 00 


Cicrnmom SB-839 t»Q ^ri i«lttnw« 


295.0Q 2 25 00 




10.00 


RCA WV9eCS#nior VTVW.fi#wi 


99 00 


53.00 




8 00 


Hirath lOW 1Q2^qHc1 Mnifi scope, nuw 


16900 


I29.O0 






Wi n 5. 1 Dw MU-go hm mpli' i \ meggn r 1 


15 0.00 


69,00 


9900 


79.00 


Lt ADEiR wvrU4> lai t}fM;<0* 






19900 


1«9(» 


MIIDA. =%SV« 4:-^ d^e^l d^-a) ««H>^ 


se9.oa $79.00 






tiffing Ilk him«Nit, ncMt 










MIIDA ^108 iOHi i*>S&aiiMi itea 


a^aoo 


?25.0l 


13995 


99.00 


C<M^ilri. n^n 










MilPA pns^iii'Dri, cai^cuMior^ 


&9 00 


- UP 



AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS 



master charge 



nan s.h. 129 ivna*!— MSjini. n. .ni.V) 

Telephone davs 13051 233 3631 mghrs and weekt'nds (30&I 666 1347 

NO ONE ANYWHERE BEATS OUR DEAL! 



BankAmericard 



^^^^^mifA^jt* 




JULY 1973 



121 




£!m. 



f*)Y*^ 






FM27B 
$430.00 



FIVI-21 220 MC %'^^ 
$280.00 with BBL-220 



I 



We stock Hy-Gain 
Antenna Specialists, Hustler 
and Cush Craft. 

All 2 meter xtals 

in stock . . . Bomar 3.95 

We also stock VHP 
and UHF amplifiers 
TPL, Dy-Comm, Standard 



<> 



HR-2B NEW 

1 2 ch xmt-rcv 
15W min 

$229,00 



HR-220 NEW 

1 2 ch 20W 220 MC 

^0 $219.00 



Standard 

Communications 

146A 

2 meter walkie 

$2^»:^ $255.00 

SR815TH 

25W 1 2 ch 

10 $499.95 



I 



AR-2 

BOW 2 meter amp. 

$l):9<^ $107.95 

EC175 

175 MC counter 

$4^0<^ $400.00 



HR-6 

6 meter 25W 

IP $215.95 

HR-212 

12 ch 20 watt 

$^^e;tf6 $230.00 



SB-450 
12 ch low 

450 MC 

^9C^ $350.00 



826MA 

12 ch 10 watts 

$350.00 



SCARPT-1A 
2 meter RPT 



B^e:^ 



SB-144 

12 ch 10 W 

10 
$239.00 



SRC14 

24 ch 10 watti 
base unit 

$529.00 



491 Riverside, Medford, Mass. 02155 

(617-396-5550) 



(§mjiT 





The NEW Excello Six Meter 
Transmitter is the FINEST 
TRANSMITTER in the VHF 
field today! 

All circuits are stressed to the fullest output 
to give Full Driwe to the next stage and final 
output. 

Modulation is pure and full using the Finest 
American Parts and American Labor. Shielding 
is used between each stage. 

Net Price to Amateurs 

Complete with Tubes 
Less Power Supply 
$9.95 Solid State 

• Base Station 

• Mobile 

• Aircraft 

• Boats 



$ 



499s 



Tube Complimenf 

sua OSC 

2£26 Final 

12AX7 Speech Amp. 

88Q5 Moduldtar 




EXCELLO EX20S 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



HOW 




80-40 METER 

The NEW Excello CW Novice 
Transmitter is THE ANSWER 
to the New Amateur getting 
on the air and enjoying the 
GREATEST OF ALL hobbies! 

The New Excello Novice CW Transmitter 
puts out a Fine CW Signal on the air. The unit 
is Small and Compact and Complete with 
Built-in Power Supply, Tubes, less crystals and 

Net Price to Amateurs ^ 

Complete F,0,B, N,Y. 

See Your Dealer 




Tube Compliment 

5763 OSC 
616 Final Amp. 
1 40 Meter Coil 
1 80 Meter Coil 




IMHEf 





Now you can QSO all over 
your local community with 
the NEW Excello Two Meter 
AM Phone Transmitter! 



Either Fixed Mobile or Portable, enough 
power to QSO yet No TVL Unit Smalt and 
Compact, enclosed in a perforated steel case to 
prevent TV I and feedback. 



Net Price to Amateurs 

Complete with Tubes 

Less Power Supply 
$9.95 Solid State 

• Base Station 

• Mobile 

• Aircraft 

• Boats 

Tube Compliment 
6BA8 Osc Mult. 
6CX8 Final Amp. 
6AQ5 Modulator 
12AX7 Speech Amp. 





to 



<0 



o 



o 
H 



OQ 



Ui 

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03 



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XT 

S 

1=1 



^ 



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tt ^ OQ 



w 



m 



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I- 



CO 



03 
+-• 

CO 

06 

■M 

o 



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JULY 1973 



123 



m 



• • « 





iammer Cruises. 



Post Office Box 120. Dept.934C ftAiamlBeachf lorida 33139. 

Cap'n Mike, send me your color brochure on 10 day ^barefoot' vacations from S250, 



Name 



AJJrcss^ 



Ciiy 



Siiife 



■- /.ip ^ 



Meet us In Martinique, at the dock 'barefoot' and well 
take you on a vacation of a lifetime, 10 Windjammin' 
days of swimming, snorkel ing and prowling uninhabited 
beaches. Well take you funny little places with funny little 
names •.•Mustique, Bequia, Saba. Carriacou. Or to 
Guadaloupe^ St. Lucia. Grenada and Martinique. And, the 
only thing better than a Windjammer day is a Windjammer 
night. Soak up a golden moon, limbo to a steel band and fall 
asleep under a star-spangled Caribbean sky. No stuffed shirts, 
no plush resorts, just a bunch of congenial shipmates 
heading for adventure. Your share from $250. Send this 
coupon to Gap'n Mike today for your color adventure brochure. 

This coupon can put 
on on a schooner to 
aba, Grenada, Martinique 
To volcanoes, pinli,white 
and blacli sand beadies. 





TERI4S 1% to DAYS 

TO RATEP ACCOtlWTS 

ALL OTHEftS ADVANCE 

CA&H, FOB PHtLA 



HANIFIN Electronics 

1666 Kinsey St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19124 



Co. 



TELEPHOME 
AREA CODE 2M 



CAPACITORS - MICA 



S 



MFD 

,000051 
,00018 

,0002 
* 00039 
.0005 
.00075 
• 0039 
,00051 
p 00015 



VOLTS 

6kv 
6ICV 

6KV 

6kv 

6iCV 

6KV 

6kv 

lOKV 

SOKV 



SIZE 

Gl 

Gl 

01 

01 

Gl 

Gl 

Gl 

02 

G3 



PRICE 

$a,95 
3.95 

3.95 
5,50 

ij.50 

9.50 

8.50 

19.95 



.001 mfd 25K? l3 Amp @ 1 mc. 
1 Ceramic terminal 
6i"3C 6''x il" footed $2^*95 



CAPACITORS - OIL FILLED 

,2 mfd 50 KVDC 
OE 14F126 

1 Porcelian terminal 

13" X 13 J'' X 5i" 1^9.95 




,25 mfd 20 KVDC 
AEBOVOX 

2 Porcelian terminal a 
8^' X IV X l|" 




$19.50 



1 mfd 10 KVDC Westinghouse 

2 Porcelian terminals 

8*' X 9" X 4" :.*•.** $19.50 

h mfd 2000 VDC CP70E1EJ405K 

2 Porcelian terminals 

3 3/i|" X 5'^ ^ Si" $3.50 

^5 mfd 1500 7DC CP7OBlEH50^K 
2 Rut)ber terminals 

1 3/^" 3C 2 3/4" X 1*' ..-■ $-75 

1 mfd 1000 VDC Aerovox 1009D 

2 Porcelian terminals 

1 3/^" X 2 1/8" X 1 1/8" . f.90 

8 mfd 600 VDC OE 23^101^1 

2 Rubber terminals 

3 5/6" 3c 3i'* X It" $1.55 



7.5 mfd 236 VAC Sprague Clor^nol 
2 Bakelite terminals 
2" X S 3/^" X H" - $-95 



METALLIZED BATHTUB 
CAPACITORS 

AEROVOX P30ZK 

^ mfd 150 VDC 
2 Side terminals 
1" X 1 3/4" X 3/^" 

10 mfd 130 7SC 

2 Side terminals 
2" X 1 3/J^" X 3/4" 




* * 



$1-25 



$2.45 



MINIATUBE CERAMIC 



mSC TRIMMER 




ERIE #538-011A-5. 5-10 

5,5 to l6mmf. Printed circuit 

mount *m****** mmlb^ ^A. 

10 for $7,00 100 for $50.00 



TRIMMER CAPACITOR 



6 to 50 mmf N750 y, 
ERIK #557 -000 B-8-50 t-SS 




Sub 



Type 
18 9 -2 

189"^ 
I89-6 



Type 
193-4 
193-6 
193-8 



E. F. JOHNSON 

Air Variable 
Capacitors 

Minature P C Mount 
Single Section 

TYPE U 

M in Ma k 

-5 1.3 5*4 

-5 1.5 9*1 

-5 1*8 13*0 

TIFE V 

Min Max 

-5 1.4 13.0 

-5 1.7 20.0 

-5 2.0 27.0 




Plates 
6 
10 
14 



Plates 
8 
12 
16 



Price 

-35 

Price 

.40 



FEED- THRU 
CAPACITOR 

1000 mfd 500 VDC 

ERIE #327-O05-X5iro-i02M. 



. $.69 



EI4ECTROLYTIC TUBULAR CONDENSERS 

MFD VDC TYPE PRICE 

10 150 TVA 1406 .25 

2 150 TVA 1410 .33 

50 50 TVA 13 06 ,27 

100 12 TVA 1130 ,27 

200 450 CD -BR 1.21 

500 25 NicKlc&n .33 

1000 15 Gallins .35 

4OO0 15 CD-BE .75 




OHMS 
5000 
lOK 
3 OK 
5 OK 
lOOK 



10 TURN PRECISION POTS 
REMOVED FROM EQUIPMENT 
WIRES ATTACHED 
CHECKED & GUARANTEED 

MFR & TYPE LIN 

HELIPOT MODEL A .5^ 

HELIPOT MODEL A . 5?£ 

HELIPOT MODEL A .5^ 

HELIPOT MODEL A aS'^ 

HELIPOT MODEL A ,2 

YOUR CHOICE $4,00 ea . 
4 for $15-00 



HELIPOT DUODIAL 
10 turn counting dial 
aluminum finish, black 
knob J with brake 
.--•...$3.95 ea. 



■ * 




Miniature 10 Turn Pot 

lOK .5?^ lin. Epectrol 570 

Bushing mount. 3/8" shaft 1/8 ^'dia. 

Removed from equip- #,....., .$2 .95 

General Radio Type 2 14 A 

Pctentiometer 

10 ohms 10 watts lA 3"dia, 

i" shaft. . $1,50 

General Radio Type 973-F 

Potentiometer 

50 ohmB 8 watts 1 3/4" dia. 

3/8" shaft 1*' long ..$1.50 

1000 ohm 25 watt Rheostat 
2 terminal metal enclosed 
3/6 bushing i" shaft. 3 for $1.00 



METAL CABINET RACK 
Dimi 21" X 13" X 8 y4" 
Accepts 19" X 7" panel. 
Has hinged top for easy 
servicing* Similar to 
Bud CR-1726. New ..$6.95 




COMPUTER GRADE ELECTROLYTIC 
CAPACITORS 



(211} PI 3-3643 



HANIFIN ELECTRONICS CO. 

1 666 Kinsey St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19124 




500 
1500 
2400 
2500 
5000 
19.000 



VOLTS 

200 

40 

25 
200 

40 
25 



MFR 



GEN. INSra. 

sprague^36d 

G.E,-43F 
MALLORY 
SPRAGUE-36D 
G.E.-43F 



PRICE EA 
$1*00 

.75 
.75 

1*50 

1.25 
2-00 




INTERGRATED CIRCUIT 
SOCKET 



AUGAT 314-AQU 14 PIN DIfAL Ilf LINE 
high profile .575 h* diallyl 
phthalatt hodj m««ts nil lC-14 

35*»# 100 for|27*50 



• « 4 « 



60 



SEMICONDUCTORS 

IN3209 Silicon Rectifier 

100 PHV 15A**.* 
1N3210 Silicon Rectifier 

200 PRV 15A*,, $.90 

2N2082 High Power Transistor 

15A TD-36 case... $1,20 
Two 2N2082 Tranalstori mounted 

on heat sink «,«•.. $2,25 



SINGLE PHASE FULL WAVE 
BRIDGE RECTIFIER 
Mototola MDA 962-4 
10 amp 30OV 




.,..$3-95 ea, 
10 for $35-00 



POWER TRANSFORMER WITH COMBINATION 
FILAMENT WINDING 

STANCOR P-6011 115 VAC 60ey input 
Secondary: 350-0-350VAC TOma 
5,0 VAC 3*0AmpB C*T» 
6.3 VAC S,5 AMpa C.T. 
Mtg centers 2 7/8" x 3 3/8" 
SPECIAL $1 . 95 ^a - 



STEP UP TRANSFORMER 292-5653P1 
PRIJ 110/115/120 VAC 
SEC: 240/270 VAC « 65O MA 

Sealed 4 5/6" x 4" x 5" $2.95 




■ * V 



COAX COriNECTORS 

ce3-isp) *, 

(83^LR) 

(83-lAP}, 

(83-lT) .,... 

(for RG58/U),,..*.. 
(for RG59/U), ...... 

Single hole mount. - 

SO-239 . .. 

Single hole mount.* 
SO-239 with i" 

demounting 

UHF Double male . , . . 



PL259 

SO239 

K359 

M358 

PL258 

UGl75/tJ 
UGI76/U 

GH2 39 
5S04 



DM 



ADAPTERS 

BNC "Female to UHF male 

BNC Male to UHF female 

BNC Female to N male.. 

BNC Male to N female* 

BNC female to BNC female* 

BNC "T" 3 females. ,.*..•* 

BNC "T" 2 females 1 male. 

BNC Ht- angle male-female 




• 75 



1,15 
1.10 





» , * A , 



, • 



1.50 
2.50 

1*85 
3.20 
1*40 
4.. 60 
2.60 
2.00 



SEND FOR FREE CATALOG 
GET ON OUR MAILING LIST 



JULY 1973 



125 



'HAM' UHF 400 MC 
HIGH POWER 
TRANSISTORS 



Low«»t ^rl^va 




Brmn^ Maw 



y J»%IS 



By RCA or equal 2N3 632. 
NTN\ 23 watts, 3 ampri, 
TO' 60 case, with slud nitj^, 
VCEV max 65. 



Sala 
$0,30 

.30 

>35 



3 for (Id. 



T-SEGMCMT 
RCA DO UTS 



LtD RCA DO UTS D 

MAN-4 EQUAL 3.95 



0-9 



Simpit in 14 -Clio DIP 

5^ 10 ma, with drrlmal 
ipajnt Likp MAN- I 
Q Sock*t for ■&«¥■, SOc 



LOGIC 

TRANSFORMERS 

lli5/i/60 to 5 volts iff 
|l20 tnu. Strap ititg. Siikncur 



Type 

D 5N7400 

n 5ii740l 

n SN7402 

O SN7403 
, D SN7404 

a SN7405 
I G SN7406 
' D SM7407 

□ SH7408 

D Si«74dS 

D SN7410 

a SN7411 

D SH7413 

n SN741S 

D SN7416 

aSNT4l7 ,! 

D SN7420 ,3 

n SN742JI 4 

a SH742Z J 

D SN7426 .: 

D SN7430 ,5 

D SH7432 ,3 

D SM7437 A 

Factory Markvdl 



Sotodion TTL IO> 

DIP** Pacli«||.i Ordtr bv t>jii. number E S|l*f nheets rm renutst ^ 0^fLY'■ 



.55 
<55 
.35 



«30 

.35 



i 



n SM7439 
G SN7440 
a SN7441 
Q SN7442 
D SN7443 

□ SII7444 

□ SN7445 
a 5H744e 
D SN7447 
n SN7448 
Q SN7450 
aSN74St 
G SN7453 
Q SN7454 
D SN7455 
D SN74GO 
G SN7464 
a 5K74SS 
G SK7470 
a Si*7472 
D SW747 3 
G SM7474 
G SN7475 
D Sr47476 
G Sl«747« 
a SN74B0 




SN74ei 
] SN74S2 
] SM7483 
] 5N74A5 
] 5N74e6 
] SH74e9 
i SN74dO 
) SM7491 
1 5N7492 
i 5N7493 
I 5M7454 
I 5N749S 
I 5147496 
[ SN74IOO 
I SI«74104 
I SM74105 
I SI474106 
Sf«74107 
SN74lOa 
SN74112 
SN741L3 
SN74I14 
SN74i2l 
SM74122 
SN74123 
SM74t40 




INTEGRATED CIRCUIT SOCKETfi 

Bay ikmf 3 - T»it« 10*. OI»coBBtl 
U 14-P|ii, dual in Hnm 5.4S 
G t^-Pin, ^ual in lin« .SO 
Q TO-5« a or 10 pins .29 

NATiONAL'OP' AMPS 



M 



G 



I 5Pr74i45 
I 5N74151 
[ 5N74153 
SPI74154 
Si474lS5 
5N74JLS6 
5N74157 
SN74L58 
SN74IB0 
Sit74l6l 

51174162 

SN74L€3 
SN74154 
51474165 
SN74ieo 
SN741BS 
5N74182 
Sff74l84 
SN74185 
SH74192 
SN74193 
5N74194 
SN74195 
5N74198 
Slf74l99 
Sff742|lO 




LINEAR 



op Amps 



• f ACTMIT 



D$1.98 

13 tor $4^50 

1 AfWP 

STRAP 

MOUNTED 

FILAMENT 

TRANSFORMERS 

|Dll5/l/eO in to L2VCT 
P 115/1/60 Into 24VCT 



SILICON TUBES 



U5y4 

□ 3114 
□ 



.SS.49 

. 3.95 
. 7.95 



Typ* 

□ 1.M-300 

D Lin-sol 

Q LAi*302 

□ LM-304 
LM-30S 
GLM^SO? 
aLM-308 

O Llli-309K 
ai.M-311 
D I.M-320 

aLni-3ao 

a LM^320 
G LII4-35D 
G LM>370 
QLM'371 
D LM-373 
G LM-380 



BUY ANY 3 _ JAM 10% 
Descrfption 



Sup«r723 V. r.g 

rli-iaerformanc* «mp , . 
Voltage follower . 

t X:^"?** ' 

Sui>er 741 , , . . 

5V 200 mil V. r.g 

5V l**mp V. r»8.* . ,. . 
Comiiarator ,...,,,, 
Minu» 5V l-«fnp V.H.*' ] 
IMJny* 12V l-amp V.(f.» 
Mlnw* 15V 1-amci V.R.* 
Dual p«riph«ra| driv^or , , 

£ i^ •^■'*^*' **»* *"*'» ■ ^ ^ 
Ail* 111' Z^ ■"•*' ....*, 
AM, FM, S5B. l-r fttrJo 
2-wan «itdio 




*TQ-3 ca^, — othVrVf O-S**^*'*^' 



3 'TANS 
ON A RACK" 

D Onl, $12.00 %IV 



4iC 



-*\ 



-*rt 



e£l 



j£L 






ewAjiAiiTrv0 

Q 531 Hi ftlaw rat* op^amp (TO-5| .. 
n 532 Mltr? CPowar 741 (TO-5 K . . . . . 

D 533 Micro powar 709 (TO-S) ..... 

G 538 FCr Input op affip tTO'5> . . . _ 
Q 537 Pnctilon 741 (T0-5» ........ 

G 540 70W pwr driver amp tTO-5) . . 

G 550 Procltlon 723 vol tar* r«s. [CltP> 

D 555 Timer 2 uS*c&Pidi to l*hT (A| . , 

D 558 5 Tim** faster than 741C ... 

O 558 Dual 741 (mini DIP| . , 

D 580 Phai* Icick Ick>P» (DIP) 

D 561 Ptias* lock Joops (DIP) 

G 5^2 PMeo lock loops (0|P1 

Q 585 Ptiase loek loops (A)^ 

D 588 Fuitctiori generator fA) 

Q 587 Ton* r*rt*rator (A) ....,_,,,*, 

B595 Four quadrant mulKpllor ..... ^ * 
702C Hi-crain, DC amp (TO-S| . _ . . 
G 703C Rr*lF, amp, 14 ckti (TO-5) . . . 

G 709C OporatlcHut amp |A) , 

Q T09€V Op amp (mini DIP) 

D 7 IOC Differential amp (A) ..*«.... 

G 7liC Dual d|ff« cpmp (A) 

G 723C Voltace ra^ulst^r (A) 

G 74 IC Freiiuency compenUitor 7 OS (A) 
n 74iev Freq. comp 709 (Mini DiP> . 

n 747C Dual 7410 (A| 

G 7*iC Freq. adj. 741C (A) 

G 748CV Freq. ad), 741C (minT DIP^ . . 

G 7O9-709 Dual 709C (DIP) 

Q 739*739 Dual atereo preamp 

□ 741-741 Dual 741C (A) , . 

D 75410 Dual parlpharal drfv«r (DIP) . 
CA) Ti)-ri or DIP dual Ln iine pak 



Tri "^prop"* /nn^ un u i*Uv&r-ffray relay rack panel 
ny"). ISjtcelU'nt lor your '*tls'\ diirkroam or any type 
of pli?(!lrnnic work. Even ideal for hobby projects. 200 
Ci'M per 4" fan. Each fan haa 5" close mesh guard 
mi each aide of fan. Easily reversible. 3000 rpm 
molur^ ha« hp of 1/60. Operates an 115/1/60 cycles. 
Wt. 7 lbs. By Il^jward Iniluzsitrif^.s, 




^=- HOT MOS FETS ^ 

G 2-MOS FETS* N ehaaneJ lOk umos riM2a.TU-lB, RCA 51 
D 2- M05 fETS. DUAL «1ATE. N cham. 3Nia7-l, TU-18, $1 
G 2*M05 FET5. DUAt CATC, N chan., :iN140'l. TU-I8, $1 




$1.98 

HIGH POWER 
TRANSISTOR 
WITH HEAT SmK 




3 f«r 
S4.50 



Removed from new equip- 
ment! Includes popular 
2N174 "doorknob' Lran^is- 
tor TO*36, g:ermanium. 
PNP, 150 watts. VCBO 
sOV, 15 amps, 4 hfe. For 
ignition, high power trans- 
mitters* etc. Mounted on 
heM sink 5 x 2^2 ^ IV4"* 



NATIONAL EQUALS ON 
„^ tDIGITAL CLOCK on a CHIP' 

l^felS^ * Money Back Guarantee ' ^"1"*^""'" 
1 1 ^V>- * With Spec Sheet ! $ 1 2.88 



LITRONIX FOL^T LED 
7-SEGNieNT READOUT 

Fin-fot-psn subMimte 
'for famuus MAN-l, 
Blectricatly the Aome* 
Snaps into 14 -pin DIP 
socket. HeQiiireu sume 
drivers, i,e.. SN74 4 6 
or SN7447 
BV @ 20 milfl per 
iegmeot* 0.30 size 
character with left 
dircimtU. Si£«: 
7/16 X 3/16'' 



X 




S2.95 

n 

TaIi* tQ% 

This display is eiKCellent for 
smaJl portabte electronics^ 
Requires) ^11 ^h as DVM's. calculators, 
etc. Equivalent to Monsanto 
MAN 3 A, Operates from 5V, 
20 mJlliaJtipieres, With 47 
ohm dropping resistor. 



♦ With Spec Sheet ! 

*lfr» f IHfcrtpti^fi £^|, 

ai-pin c»r.mlc. mny r*aifout, S12.at 
0-dttttst A-B-O 

?*Jf*.'i* etr»fi»i5, any r**daMt, $12,88 

28-p|fi* esrifnFc, any raadout^ $12.88 

»*«JgJU: A-C 

24*p|it, pNftUe, LED and Sl2.6« 

i(lcai«d*tc«nt r«adoata« 
_ . * •■<t*8it»: A-B 

Code J A HoJd Cuunt. C 1 PPS OulDut 

B Output Strobe. D — BCD 




■T 1 



1«' 



Buy 3 ^^ Take 10 % 




MITY DIGITS 
"DCM'S'' 

C«urltmg 
Modultik 



9.99 



INCLUOCS P.C, CDGC 
CONNECTOlt — FREE! 



& Brwftfield 

KAP RELAYS 






^£mjftt 



£;jtcelleiit tQt "BAM" u#e am imi^imit ^witcliinf. latchingf 
traasEAitp receive, etc., and lf>0*a of commercial or in- 
duairiaJ itiae», [nclude« plaatic dintt'Cov^r with diAsram 
and hookup jnlo, IJ-pIci plii^-in base. Coiitacts movable 
gold flashed aitver» atation.BLry overlay, with silver cad- 
mium omida movHbleft. AH contacia 10 &cnp 3PDT. Coil 
dalaai5VAC 225 ohma, X7.S ma, 12 VDC 21 mib 
l§a ohma. Siic^ 2 V*^ x 1 6/16". Wt. 4 oia. Center pin J^OT 
mlAAinff, Comar Mis. type e^uAl too. Q %M.m VAC O 12 ¥DC 




Will outperforni aoy otner 
DCM on the mark«i tod&)% 
not gS-SeauSp not iitrAndrll'* 
cent^ but a device that will 
READ aimoat for life. MAK- 
4, MoDAanto e^ual. 

KU iacludea: 3 it Z" priateJ 

ckt boajndf with fin. 

ffers too? Sidc-tnounUnff 
socket^ MAX-4 reaifitcj-ra^ 

T4-l§. 7 4 75, T4^0, booklet. 



Terittftt add po»taice Rated: n^t 30 

PliofM Orders: Wakefield, Mass. (IJlTl 24S-:ixaTi 
R«tail? IG*1H [>e| Cartnine St.. Wakefield. Mass, 
inrt Water Street* C.O.D.S MAY BE PHOSEO 




L 



U 13« CAULOe on fiber Optics. 'ICs'. S«mi's. Parts 

POLY PAKS 



BOX •42*. LVMNFIELD.MASS. 01V44 



T26 



73 MAGAZINE 



know this sign 




To most people this is a symbol from 
Greek mythology. But to hundreds of 
thousands of active amateurs, Pegasus is 
the symbol of the Radio Amateur CALL* 
BOOK the single most useful operating 
reference for active amateur stations. 
The U.S, Edition lists over 285,000 Calls, 
Names and Addresses in the 50 States 
and U.S* possessions while nearly 200,000 
amateur stations in the rest of the World 
are listed in the DX edition. 

Both editions contain much other invalu- 
able data such as World Maps, Great 
Circle Maps, QSL Managers around the 
World, ARRL Countries list and Amateur 
Prefixes around the Worfd, Time informa- 
tion. Postal Information and much, much 
more. You can't contest efficiently, you 
can't DX efficiently, you can't even oper- 
ate efficiently without an up to date 
CALLBOOK. 

To make the CALLBOOK even more val- 
uable, three supplements are issued each 
year which bring your copy completely up 
to date every three months* These are 
available at a modest extra cost. Full de^ 
tails in every CALLBOOK. 

Get your copies of the big new 1973 
CALLBOOKS today. 



US CALLBOOK 

(less service edttions) 

Just $8.95 
US CALLBOOK 

(with service edftions) 

$14.95 

Man orders add SO^ 
and handling. 



DX CALLBOOK 

(less service editions) 

Just $6.95 
DX CALLBOOK 

(with service editions) 

$11.45 

per CALLBOOK postage 



handling. 
See your favorite dealer or send today to: 



RADIO AMATEUR 






lit. 



oo 



k 



INC. 



Dept B 925 Sherwood Drive 
Lake Bluff, 111. 60044 




Digipet-60 

n^equency 

Counter 

I KHZ-60 MHz 

(130-160 MHi wtlh opiionar CQnvert«r> 

" © 9 ■ ^ 5J 5J See /Vol., 72 CO & Aprlt '73 QST Reviews] 

I A frequency counter wrth a ranfle of 1 kHz fo 60 MHr (or 130-150 MHr w^en 
uMd with our Digipel-160 converterl. With a resolution of 1 kHz or 1 Hz {at 1 ms. 
Of 1 s. gate times). It can be operated on either AC or DC, with dompletfl overload 

I protection. P4ut a stabinty aging rate of 1 part in iQ^/wetk. Ancf the whoi^« unit Is a{ 

Imere 7" deep by 2Vj' high! Superb precision qua Fity at LESS THAN KIT PRICES. 
Call or write toi literature and trade \n on our J ^QW INTRQDUCTOR^RHICE. 1 

fyoaf wsrrsnty. 

Aiso MUDA PR^aSfON AUTOftANGmG DfGfTAL VOL TMETER 
(reg. $3f9} LESS THAN KIT PRICES. Compare beforB you Uty! 
1 y£AB WARRANTY NO ONE ANYWHERE BEATS OUR DEAL f ! 

AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS 

$817 SM 729 Terrace, Mrami, Ff33J5e 

^ Days f305) 233^383! 



'^^ff^m^^ 



master charge 



YAESU 

Newly appointed dealer for th§ 
East Coast is now taking orders 
on Yaesu equipment Send for 
Ut'^.rature and free list of used 
equipment available* 

FRECK RADIO & SUPPLY CO. 

40 Biltmore Avenue 

P.O. Box 7287 

Asheville, North Carofina, 28807 
Telephone: 704-254-9551, W4WL 




In this issue, do you think there is a need for 
more 

Simple construction projects 
Complex construction projects 
General interest articles 
Humor articles 
Specialized columns 
Operating news 

Comments 



Yes 


No 


D 


D 


□ 


a 


D 


D 


n 


D 


n 


D 


n 


□ 



JULY 1973 



127 



wt 



READER SERVICE 

Please either tear out this fist of advertisers and send it 
in to 73 with as many boxes checked off as you would 
like to see brochures, data sheets or catalogs . , , or 
else make a copy and send that in. Include your zip 
code, please. 



ADVERTISER INDEX 



□ Amat. Whol. Elec. 121, 

127 
* ATV Research 61 

D A&W 122 

Q 8omar 84 

D Call book 127 

D CFP 93 

n C&H Safes 118, 1 19 

D Clegg 36 

D ComSpec 61 

n Cornell 92 

n Data Engineering 105 

D Datak 88 

n DuPage FM 106 

n Electronic, Distr. 18 



n Jeff-Tronics 84 

D Jensen 93 

n Juge 98 

D KLM Electronics 17,20 

n Meshna 112, 113, 114, 

1 15 
n Midland 107 

D MilHwatt 92 

D IWorgain 61 

Q Newtronics 64 

n Palomar 88 

D Pemco 103 

D Poly Paks 126 

□ Regency Cover II 

n Rohn 90 



PROPAGATION CHART 
J,H. Nelson 
Good (Open) Fair ( D ) Poor (O) 

July 1973 

SUN MON TUES WED THUR 

® 

8 



FRI 



SAT 





n EL Instruments Cover IV * RP Electronics 18 



□ Erickson 82 
n Estes 58 

□ Exceftronics 123 
D Freck 127 

n Gam Electronics 120 

n Gateway 73 

D Genave 52 

n GLB Electronics 92 

n Gregory 74 

Q Hamtronics 42,43 

n Hanifin 125 

D Heath 55 

n Henry 35. 89 



□ Savoy Cover III 
n Sentry 11 

n Signal Systems 66 
D Solid State 117 
D Space Electronics 73 
Q Standard Comm. 5 
D Tucker 93 

□ Tel rex 31 

D Unidyne 104 

□ Van,W2DLT 93 

n VHF Engineering 110 
n Vibroplex 61 
D Waller 111 



□ Hy-Gain 96, 97, 108, 109 D Webster 116 

n ICOM 19 a Windjammer 124 

D Jan 58 D World QSL 92 

n Janet 82 Q Yaesu 22 

73 Stuff 

Digital Control Book 67 
FM Atlas 68 
Certificates 100 
Books 99, 101 
Subscriptions 102 



Coupon expires in 60 days 



JUI-Y 1973 



•Reader service inquiries not solicited. Correspond 

directly to company. 
Mail to: 

R eader's Service 
73 Inc., Peterborough NH 03458 

Please Prin t or Type 



Name 



Cad 



Address 
Ctiy 



15 16 



22 



M 




25 26 



Possible aurora 28, 30. 




EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 




GMT: «> 07 04 Oil m »o t2 \a \% vfi 


20 22 




AUA&KA 


14 


14 


7 


7 I 






7 


7 7 


>A 


7A 


14 




ARCEhJTIMA 


14 


14 


t4 


7A 






14 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


14A 




AUSTRALIA 


14 


14 


7A 


7B 






7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 




CANAL ZONE 


14 


t4 


>A 


7 






7A 


14 


14 


14 


14 


t4A 




iNGLAAID 


7A 


7A 


1 


7 




7A 


14 


14A 


T4A 


14 


14 


14 




HA WAN 


U 


1« 


7A 


7 






7 


7 


7A 


14 


14 


14 




IWDtA 


7A 


7 


m 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7A 


14 


T4 


14 


14 


14 




JAPAN 


14 


14 


7A 


T 






7 


7 


» ' ! 


7 


14 




MEXICO 


1* 


14 


-7 


7 






7 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 




PHtLIPffNES 


14 


t4 


TS 


7B 


ra 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7A 


7A 




f'UERTOfllCQ 


14 


7A 


7 


7 






7 


7 


H 


14 


14 


14 




SOUTH Affile A 


7B 


7 


3A 


7 


78 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 


7B 


78 




u, s.s. n« 


7 


? 


7 


7 






7A 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 




WEST COAST 


T4 


14 


7 


7 






7 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


14 




CENTRAL UNITED STATES 


TO: 




ALASKA 






7A 


7 










7 


7A 


14 






ARGENTINA 






tA 


7A 






7A 


14 


M 


14 


MA 






AuisinALrA 






14 


7 ' 










7 


7 


14 






t:ANAL zont 


14A 




7A 


7 






7A 


2S 


» 


2S 


2S 


2SA 




ENGLAND 


7A 




7 


7 








14 


14 


14 


14 






HAWAII 






14 


7A 










7A 


14 


14 ^ 






INDIA 






7B 


7B 


7B 


70 






t4 


14 


14 






iAPAM 






14 


7 










7 


7 


7A 






MEXICO 






7 


7 










7 


7A 


14 






PHILIPPINES 






14 


7B 


7B 


7Q 






7 


7 


7A 


7A 




PUERTO RICO 




_ J 


T 


7 








H 


14 


14 


14 


14 




SOUTH AFRICA 


7Q 




SA 


7 


TB 


7a 


14 


t4 


14 


14 


78 


?e 




U.S.S. H. 


7 




7 


? 




7 






14 


T4 


14 










3 STATES 


TO: 




WESTERN Ur 


JITEC 




ALASKA 


14 




14 


7 


' 


7 


7 


7 


1 






7A 




ARGENTINA 


14A 




14 


7A 




T 


IT 


14 


14 


t4 




14A 




AUSTRALIA 




14A 


?1 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 










QAHAi. ZONC 






7A 


7 




7 


7 


14 


14 










ENGLAND 


7A 




7 


7 




7 


7 


7A 


14 










HAWAII 






14A 


14 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


7A 










INDIA 






14 


7a 


7B 


7a 


7B 


14 


14 










JAPAN 






14 


14 




7 


7 


7 


7 










MEXICO 






7A 


7- 




7 


7 


7A 


14 










f>H»LIPPINES 






14 


14 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 










PUEHTO ftiCO 






7A 


7 




7 


7 


7A 


14 










SOUTH Af RICA 


m 


?• 


XA 


T 


78 


7B 


7B 


14 


14 




7« 


7t 




U s s n. 






7 


7 




7 


7 


1 


14 




78 


78 




EAST COAST 


14 


14 


7 


7 




7 


7 


7A 


14 




I" 


14 


: 



1 



3 4 


5 6 1 


20 11 


12 13 14 


11 18 


19 20 21 



State 



Zip 



A - Next higher frequency may be useful also, 
B = Difficult circuit this period. 



128 



73 MAGAZINE 





SAVOY 



BASSETT 

"high efficiency mobile 
indj portable antennas 
for all amateur bands, 
CAP, MARS, CB. 
SECURITY, 
PUBLIC SERVICE, 
MARINE, AND 
6QVERNMENT USE. 

• 2-6-10-15-20-40-75 

• Identical size, cost, 
and appearance 

FULLY ADJUSTABLE 
TO FREQUENCY 
IN FIELD 

Low weight, low drag, 
high strength 
fiberglass 

Polished 
chrome brass 
standard ^8-24 thread 

High gain Gollinear 
on 2 meters 






MODEL DGA-2M 

$29.50 postpaid 

in U.S.A. 



Postpaid in U.S.A. 



TYPE 900 A 



TYPE 901 




HIGH ACCURACY CRYSTALS 

FOR OVER 30 YEARS 

Either type for amateur VHF in Regency, Swan, Standard, Drake, Vari- 
tfonlcs, Tempo, Yaesu, Galaxy, Trio, Sonar, Clegg, SBE, Genave. 

Quotes on request for amateur or commercial crystals for use In all 
other equipments. 

Specify crystal type, frequency, make of equipment and whether transmit 
or receive when ordering. 



BASSEH VACUUM BALUN 



"^jf 







BASSETT VACUUM TRAP ANTENNA SYSTEM 

Complete packaged mylti-ttand artteima sys* 
terns employing the famous Bassett Sealed 
Rasonatars and Bafun from which air has 
been removed and replaced with pure 
helium at one atmosphere. Operating bands 
are indicited by model designation. 

MODEL DGA-4075 $59,50 

MODEL DGA-204075 . . $79.50 

MODEL DGA-2040 $59.50 

MODEL DGA- 152040 .. $79.50 



The famous sealed helium filled Balun . . . 
employed with the DGA Series Antenna 
Systems. Solderfess center insulator and 
easily handles more than full legal power 
while reducing unwanted coax radiation. 
Equipped with a special 80-239 type coax 
connector and available either 1:1 or 4^1. 

MODEL DGA-2000-B . . . $12.95 
l^osfpaid In U^S.A. 



CONTACT YOUR DISTRIBUTOR OR WRITE FOR DATA 



V^i '^ 



f t 



P.O. Box "7137 - Fort Lauderdale, Florida - 33304 

Tel: 305-566-8416 or 305-947-11Si 



i 



I 



1 



HVy^4 K3WLN tjilJpPLy 



Now ... a universal AC 
power supply for your FM 
transceiver and your ampti- 
fier! 

At last, you can get the 
power you want at the price 
you want, with the new PW-4 
from E&L. Plug it into any 
110-120 volt AC source and 
you get a rated output of 13 
volts DC @ 72 amps, LC. 
regulated to ±Z% I The PW-4 
features a circuit breaker re- 
set, modern cabinet design, 
and heavy duty components 
for reliability. Use it with 
most 12-13 volt DC trans- 
ceivers, together with your 
50-60 watt amplifier. The 
PW-4 sells for $84.95, direct 
from the factory, or your lo- 
cal distributor. 



»f 



l<» 






i»c 



Get your mobile rig into the 
house ... get a PW-41 

Write to: 



E&L INSTRUMENTS, INC. 
61 First Street 
Derby, Connecticut 06418 
attn: Dick Vuillequez — W1FBS 



»* 



J